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51

This also happens with common unsweetened instant coffee (without chicory) if you allow it to cake and then try to heat in a pan or any other kind of heat that is concentrated on a specific spot or surface. Instant coffee (a.k.a. soluble coffee) is made by spray-drying brewed coffee, and not by finely grinding coffee grains. You are not dealing with a moist ...


31

Butter may look totally amorphous, but there's actually a fair amount of structure in the fat, in particular fat crystals that make it firmer. Melting it disrupts all that structure, and it can't regain it just by resolidifying, so the structure of previously melted butter really is different. You might notice that this is similar to chocolate: if you take ...


29

Part of making butter is churning... the churning process introduces a ton of air into the butter. When you melt it, all of the air is released so you should never expect melted butter to return to the same state it was before it was melted. The air trapped in butter is what causes the lighter color you see... if you take softened butter and whip it (as ...


20

There is indeed a physical change that occurs. If you think back to grade school science you probably remember learning about solutions and suspensions, and how the former is a mixture that stays mixed when left alone (like saltwater) and the latter is a insoluble particles dispersed in a liquid, which separate if left alone (like water and sand if you ...


18

Three factors influence how well cheese melts: The amount of moisture, The amount of fat, How it was set. The meltiest cheeses have a lot of moisture and fat and were set with rennet and not acid. Both moisture and fat leave space between the casein proteins that allows them to move. Otherwise they are packed together and don't flow as well. Aged cheeses ...


15

One simple option is to shred the cheese. The heat moves from the surface of the pancake into the cheese - so a thick slice has to melt all at once, and from the bottom up, and it may not melt in time. Grated or shredded cheese has a lot more surface area, and warms quicker, and traps heat in the air between the shreds, and so will melt much quicker than ...


13

If you can, just get better marshmallow skewers/forks. If there are two prongs on the end, the marshmallow can't rotate. (And as long as you're not holding it at a really steep angle, they'll have a hard time sliding off the end too.) You can get fancy ones with nice handles, but just plain metal is fine. And it doesn't have to be super strong, so you can ...


10

Are you using a metal skewer? Metal will carry heat much more than other materials such as wood, and will cause the inside of the marshmallow where it is skewered to soften and slide under the weight of the rest of the marshmallow. If you're aiming for a golden brown crust, then the key is to cook it quickly at just the right distance away so that the ...


8

If all you're trying to do is melt it, then there's no structure you can mess up. The only harm you can cause is by scorching or burning spots, which might happen if your microwave is uneven and you heat too fast without stirring. But otherwise, the microwave is a great way to melt chocolate. Open it up and give it a stir now and then, be careful not to ...


8

The method that you describe says you put all the cheese in a row, if you make that row thick it's going to have a hard time melting. Instead of a thick line spread the cheese out evenly across the whole pancake, maybe keeping about 1cm of edge free of cheese to help reduce oozing after rolling.


8

However adding more cheese means making the row thicker and sometimes not all the cheese melts. I am looking for a way to add more cheese while still getting it all to melt One thing you can do is to cover the pancake after adding the cheese. I often cook hamburgers on a flat griddle, and if I want to make a cheeseburger I'll add cheese after flipping the ...


8

That's a processed cheese product. It may be allowed to be called cheese in some places, but that's a matter of product labelling regulations where you happen to be. The melting is a different issue. I'd expect that product to melt, though possibly not if it has the texture of parmesan - parmesan doesn't really melt on its own though it melts into sauces. ...


7

The magic is from Sodium Citrate Most mass produced cheese it based on "cheddar blends". Basically large (50 Kg to 1 Mg) blocks of cheese are made in a milk factory. When a consumer product is to be made from it, the cheddar is shredded, flavour and/or culture is added, and then using heat and pressure it is re-packed into consumer sized packages In some ...


6

This is tricky because you don't really want the cheese to melt, you want it to become pliable enough to roll. When making fresh mozzarella, the curds are heated in 90 - 100 degree F water to make them pliable, then heated further (maybe 120 F) for stretching and folding. This is for fresh. I would assume factory produced mozzarella will behave slightly ...


6

It very well might destroy the structure of the chocolate. Since cocoa butter has a crystalline structure, when it cools it will set differently based on how how it was. If melt chocolate over water, you're guaranteed (more or less) that none of it will reach a temperature over 212 Fahrenheit. If you melt it in the microwave, due to the nature of the ...


5

In the past I have had a similar issue with making a butterscotch drink recipe. What I have found is that adding a bit of water to the melted butter (1-2 tsp/1/2 c, 5-10mL/120mL) helps dissolve the brown sugar and prevents graininess and seizing. Sugar is not readily soluble in fat, so it needs water in order to dissolve. I suspect one of three things ...


5

I usually add vegetable shortening to my frosting recipe so that it doesn't melt easily. I live in India and it's hot in here for crying out loud. Another helpful tip is to add 2 tsp Meringue powder to your each icing batch, that tends to avoid the weepy icing. Hope this helps. (Source: Years of commercial bakery experience and my fair lot of sad weepy ...


5

Many frostings incorporate more than butter as the fat in the icing. I recently made ones using shortening, coconut butter, and coconut milk solids. These three are all fats that have higher melting points and are more reliable at higher temperatures in comparison to butter. If you wish to retain as much of the butter mouthfeel as possible, you might ...


5

There's nothing about melting butter that's difficult if you simply pay attention to what you're doing. It only takes a minute or two to melt even a pound of butter no matter whether you use a stove or a microwave. Use a sauce pan, not a frying pan on, on the stove. Use a glass measuring cup or microwave-safe bowl in the microwave. Don't walk away -- stay ...


5

There's two methods for this, which can also be combined. The first, as several people have mentioned, is to make sure that the eggs and water are slightly above room temperature. At 27C/80F ghee (and, for that matter, butter) is liquid, so if you can ensure that the rest of the batter is that temperature, it will stay liquid when mixed. The easiest way ...


4

Without taking away anything from the previous answers, I want to add one more reference: Kenji Alt's article on making a perfectly smooth cheese sauce. He describes the science in great detail, as well as providing lots of documentation of his various experiments. His final recipe comes down to a simple methodology: Toss the real cheese, shredded, with ...


4

I recently had a similar problem, and I would guess that your solution will be similar as well. As in my case your recipe fails to be specific regarding too what temperature to elevate your mixture. To solve this you will need a candy thermometer. (In the US these are available at most stores that carry kitchen implements (Wal-xxx, Tarxx, etc.) The peek ...


4

I'm going to take something from Megha's answer and go a bit further. I think what you want is a quesadilla. A crêpe (which is the kind of pancake I think you're referring to) is very similar to a tortilla, except that it made from a runny batter and is somewhat more at risk to overcooking and burning. It's also a lot floppier, which means that it is not ...


4

Use a microwave to pre-heat the cheese. You'll need to experiment with timings for your cheese/quantities/microwave, but it's easy enough to microwave cheese until it's almost melting but not quite. Then chuck the hot cheese on the pancake. One drawback to this becoming a "hefty snack" is that unless your cheese holds together when cooked (like halloumi), ...


3

Not all the fat in beef (and generally, in any kind of meat) is the same. Any piece of meat will have a certain amount of marbling fat, which is intramuscular and is hard to remove, intermuscular fat and subcutaneous fat, which can be trimmed off. From your picture, it seems to me that the fat covering the outer layer of the beef chunks is gristle, which ...


3

You can prevent prevent cheese from separating as it heats by adding sodium citrate to the recipe. Sodium citrate is the same ingredient used as the binder in processed cheese and wine-based cheese recipes. I bought a bag from Amazon that will last me a lifetime: http://www.amazon.com/Sodium-Citrate-Non-GMO-Molecular-Gastronomy/dp/B00BLPNM62/ref=sr_1_2?ie=...


3

Working with chocolate is so tricky! Introducing even a tiny amount of water to melted chocolate will cause it to seize. The water could come from unexpected places: steam from a double boiler, condensation on the interior of a lid, the use of a wet utensil. Seized chocolate can be returned to a smooth, melty texture, but it will no longer be suitable for ...


3

No. Cottage cheese is a type of acid coagulated cheese, much like ricotta, feta and farmers cheese. It will continue to have lumps when heated, which will never be smooth. The other type of cheese to avoid for melting is long aged hard cheeses like Parmesan or sharp cheddars. These tend to "break" and separate into an oily mess. Adding butter or cream ...


3

If the ghee was too hot, the eggs would cook on contact with it, so you can simply increase the temperature. Melting it in a heavy bowl (ceramic or Pyrex) would hold a bit more heat, even at sensibly low temperature, so that might help. You may have let it cool too much - it will drop to just above it's melting point, then the addition of cold stuff will ...


3

If you can get them out of the jar, I would suggest a hammer. Put them in a plastic bag and whack them with the hammer. You might be able to use a knife (carefully) to pry them apart depending on much they are stuck together.


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