56

It was timing. If you want to make chocolate meringues, add the cocoa powder to the liquid egg whites, and then whisk it all together at once. Beaten egg whites are bubbles. Don't add things to an already-formed meringue, as they will just cause the bubble structure to collapse. Ever sprinkled sugar or cinnamon powder on a cappuccino? Notice how the ...


17

Ingredient substitution lists say you can use an equal volume of lemon juice or vinegar if you don't have cream of tartar. Most likely, the assumption has been that a baker will be more likely to have cream of tartar on hand than other acid sources due to the fact that it has multiple uses in the kitchen: Leavening Stabilization of egg whites Prevent ...


12

The sad fact is: you usually know it when, half an hour after you are done whipping it, it floats in a puddle of liquid. The problem is that it actually continues changing after you have stopped whipping. So, you really have to learn what the previous stage looks like, and stop whipping when that is reached. That's why I don't whip to really stiff peaks ...


10

Technically, the minimum ratio of sugar is zero. You can definitely create a stable meringue without any sugar at all, although you'll have to mind your conditions and preparation - use a spotlessly-clean bowl, room-temperature egg whites (separated when chilled), initially foamed up on low speed with an acid such as vinegar or cream of tartar, superfine ...


8

Acids allow more air to be beaten into a meringue. In order to make meringue, the proteins in egg white must be denatured. In their natural state, the proteins are curled up into tightly packed balls. When the egg is beaten, they uncoil into long strands. These strands then begin to coagulate, or join together, with the help of the sugar you add. The air ...


7

Yes you can - if you make the right kind of meringue. There are three types that vary in the preparation process: French (or classic) meringue Where egg whites are simply beaten with fine sugar. Swiss meringue Where the egg & sugar is beaten over a water bath. Italian meringue Where the whites are beaten first and a steady stream of hot sugar syrup is ...


6

First of all, I suggest reading through our other questions on meringues and general egg-beating, to rule out any issues with your technique regardless of sugar content: Beating Egg Whites with Granulated Sugar Added for Tapioca Pudding How to minimise sugar in meringue Why do my egg whites separate after whipping? Making my meringues form peaks How can I ...


6

That's often referred to as weeping. A few things might help. Is your pie filling hot when you spread the meringue? If the filling is cool, the meringue will cook unevenly (the top before the bottom), causing weeping. If your filling is cool, put the pie in the oven for a few minutes before applying the meringue. Another thing that might help is equal ...


6

The problem here is partially timing but mostly the second whipping; it's better to fold-in dry ingredients rather than whip into an already formed meringue. The cocoa added to the whipped egg white doesn't help stabilize it, so whipping it again once it's added will cause the bubble-structure to collapse rapidly. Delicately folding-in the cocoa until it ...


5

As there are multiple types of meringues, I imagine the core of this question is really the effect of acid on egg white foaming. According to KATERYNA LOMAKINA and KAMILA MÍKOVÁ writing in the Czeck Journal of Food Science, there is a moderately complex relationship between pH of the egg whites, and its foaming capacity (overrun) and the stability of the ...


5

Joy of Baking actually recommends using parchment or foil: ... it is a good idea to use parchment paper or aluminum foil to line your baking sheets, not wax paper, as the meringue will sometimes stick to wax paper. According to Living Strong: Next in line for substitutions similar to parchment paper comes aluminum foil. The flexibility of the ...


5

As you have not posted a recipe I can't tell you how to fix it for next time. I can't tell you what is wrong with them though. Brown, because the oven was too hot. I do mine by blasting in oven at 135c for 15min then turning it off and going home. Then when I get back to work in the morning they are perfect. Flat, because... Many possibilities Over/undrr ...


5

In short, if they are safe to eat cooked still they are likely safe to eat in a meringue. There is a higher chance of salmonella on the outside of shell than the inside. 2 Weeks for eggs in the fridge is not very long. To find out a bit about the bacteria actions within the egg, submerge the whole egg fully in 2 cup a measuring cup of water. Make sure there ...


4

If the meringues are coming out of the oven sticky, you might lower the temperature slightly and extend the drying time (to avoid browning)--they should feel quite dry and very light coming out of the oven. Sugar is hydrophilic--if the air is humid, any condensation--even when you cannot see it--on the meringues will dissolve the sugar, and then they will ...


4

In my experience, storing pavlova in an airtight container makes it weep and go soft. My mother's tip is to keep it in the oven (a cool, turned off oven), as it's not air tight but it is 'out of the air'. It's always worked for me.


4

The crusting is important so that any flowers or other intricate decorations will fix their shape and not slump when left out in warmer temperatures. (you don't want to refrigerate iced cakes, as when you remove them from the fridge, you'll get condensation). An icing that crusts quickly means that you can use an icing that's not quite as stiff for your ...


4

You want to be sure that the egg whites are fully whipped before you add pieces of anything (it's also best to incorporate sugar as either a syrup or very finely ground sugar once the eggs are already whipped as sugar can make the whipping take longer). When you incorporate pieces of anything into your meringue, be it nuts, candy, etc, fold it in gently ...


4

They're just called meringues... Make sure to use a recipe for French meringue, not Italian meringue. http://hipparis.com/2011/03/14/au-merveilleux-de-fred-a-meringue-bakery-in-paris/#more-16159


4

Definitely egg white seepage, by the looks of the shape of it you've either over whipped the egg whites OR let them sit for too long before cooking which meant they spilt slightly before going in the oven. Another possibility is the oven wasn't hot enough to begin with OR the environment (kitchen) was too warm. When ever I've cooked meringue I've had the ...


4

First, double check that your oven temps are accurate with a thermometer that you can place in the oven. After that, two things I would try.. Rack Positioning I've baked meringues at similar temps without browning. It could be the position of the rack within the oven? If it was mainly the top that browned, move lower. If it was mainly the bottom that ...


4

Yes, that's fine - if you take a few precautions. Once you have opened your eggs, you are exposing the contents to the air. So need to protect the eggs from drying out: A matching small jar or plastic container is a good choice for the yolks. For whites, you can even put them in your mixing bowl and cover tightly, which saves on cleanup. You need not worry ...


4

Stephie's answer is great. I'd just add a couple thoughts: Swiss meringue can be safe too, but you'd have to verify the temperature the egg whites are brought to over the water bath. With good technique, it should pasteurize the eggs. An alternative is to use pasteurized egg whites. These products often got poor reviews for meringue when they showed up ...


4

What country are you in? In the UK, salmonella has now been virtually eliminated from egg production and the latest advice is that eggs produced in the UK are safe to eat uncooked, even for pregnant women and other high-risk groups. So if you’re using British eggs, undercooking your meringues wouldn’t matter from a safety point of view.


4

There could be a few things going on here: If it is the meringue that is not holding - you probably need to beat it longer (stiff peaks will hold in bowl if turned upside down for a short time) and add the sugar slowly to ensure that it dissolves before spreading. To test if the sugar is dissolved, pinch a small amount between finger and thumb and rub; if ...


4

The basic difference is consistency: meringue tends to be lighter, airier, and drier, while nougat is more chewy. This is achieved by different ratios of sugar to egg whites. Nougat has significantly more sugar in proportion to egg whites. (Compare this nougat recipe, ~4 cups sugar/honey to four egg whites, and this meringue recipe, 1/4 cup sugar to four ...


4

Generally speaking, I think experimentation is the way to go. There are a lot of recipes for Italian meringue (and Italian meringue frostings) you can try to see what effect the different sugar content has. Reducing the sugar can definitely reduce the stability, but stability is a somewhat subjective term. That's why I recommend experimentation. It's hard to ...


3

Actually, this can be done but it may not be convenient to do if you aren't in a restaurant setting where this can streamline your process. If you take equal parts egg whites and sugar, beat them together, cook at 74C for 30minutes and then transfer them to the siphon and charge with 4 cartridges, dispense to desired shape, and then bake at 150C until set (...


3

I made Pavlovas 2 weeks ago for a wedding, 2 were left over. They are sitting on parchment paper and wrapped 3 times in cling film and have been in the fridge since then. I am having guests on Sunday 7th June and am going to put cream and fresh fruit on them. I have just checked them and they are fine.


3

Both solutions will work. If you are making more mering, then make sure the thickness of the meringue layer in stays the same as for the small tin. If you scale the recipe correctly this happens automatically. I think your math is off though. The area of your 24 inch tin is only 1.77 times larger than the 18 inch pan. Assuming your pan is round: The area ...


3

I have made two separate meringue mixtures side by side: one with vinegar and one without. In my experience it makes no difference to the final outcome provided that you add the sugar really slowly (a tablespoon at a time) and not too early. If this is done correctly then there is no need to add an acid.


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