23

An enchilada is a corn tortilla wrapped around some filling (often meat and/or cheese), covered in sauce. The sauce is really defining here: the word is derived from a verb meaning "to season with chili". The sauce usually involves chili peppers, but doesn't always, especially for Tex-Mex and American Variants. Since it's covered in sauce, you eat it off a ...


17

Quesadilla comes from queso, cheese, and that is mostly what goes in there. Maybe some jalapeños or onions, but that's really it. In a burrito you'd add much more, both volume and variety, for example meat, rice, avocado, cream, cheese, chiles, and beans. As far as I know the quesadilla goes in the pan on heat, whereas a burrito does not get heated after ...


14

The origin of chili con carne is actually from the American southwest, not Mexico. It's tex-mex, not mex. There are many variations on chili con carne, however if you go back to the earliest known recipes cocoa or chocolate are not on them. It's pretty basic, flavored mostly by cumin and chili. So if you want to make the most authentic chili to the origin ...


12

By far the easiest way to make flat quesadillas is just to use two tortillas, like a sandwich. No worries about folding things up that way. If you want the folded in half or folded in thirds kind, the main things to keep in mind are that you want nice big flexible tortillas, and you don't want to overfill it. That should let you fold it fairly easily, and ...


12

Mole is often made with unsweetened chocolate or cocoa powder. No added sugars are involved. (There is a tiny amount of natural sugar in the cacao, about 1%.) Chocolate is not absolutely necessary in mole. Mole verde generally does not contain chocolate; some recipes for mole rojo also leave it out. You could simply leave out the cocoa from a mole recipe, ...


12

Part of the problem is that "salsa" doesn't mean just one thing to everyone. If you do a web search for "avocado salsa" you get images ranging from liquid to chunky: Similarly, there's no one "correct" way to make guacamole. Some people like it smooth and thick - hummus-like, if you will, other people like it partially mashed ...


11

You're correct - it's a myth, as is adding something acidic to it like lemon juice--see explanation here. As you said, what causes it to brown is the oxidation, and that's just exposure to the air. If you wrap a cut avocado (or guacamole) in plastic wrap so there's no air space between the wrap and the avocado, then it will stay green longer than areas where ...


11

I think you have three options. Mole doesn't require chocolate. Find a recipe that doesn't have any. This recipe on Epicurious doesn't have chocolate, though they address that by noting that their inclusion of ancho chiles gives the chocolate flavor (I haven't tried any of these recipes, so don't take this as endorsement of them). Ancho chiles — large, ...


10

I have read all the suggestions and have decided that there is no "One size fits all" answer...just common sense. If you are concerned about sodium/sugar -Rinse. If the liquid turns you off - Drain/Rinse. If you are putting them in a salad or dry dish - Rinse/Drain. When using canned beans in Chili, Soup, or any dish requiring liquid - Draining/Rinsing ...


10

Taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco_burrito Two key technologies that made the San Francisco burrito possible are the large flour tortilla and tortilla steamers, which together increase the flexibility, stretch, and size of the resulting tortilla. The tortilla steamer saturates the gluten-heavy tortilla with moisture and heat, ...


10

You probably want to just use already-cooked beans, from a can. (Hope there's a store nearby.) Then you just have to cook as long as it takes to let the flavors mingle; half an hour is plenty. If you happen to have a pressure cooker, you can cook dried beans much faster, something like 20-30 minutes. See for example this recipe - you can add back in ...


8

Bull-honkey on the steamers part. All you need is a comal (a.k.a. griddle) for the cooking, and later, re-heating part. The reason your toritllas get hard after day 1 is due to the baking powder. I know you're saying "but I need that to rise or get soft and chewy". Again bull-honkey. I make awesome "mission" style tortillas on an every-other-week basis ...


8

Google is correct, in that it can be a shortening of 'chile con queso' (most typically in the US to non-spanish speakers). But 'chile' is not the same as 'chili'. 'Chile' refers to peppers, so the dip is 'peppers with cheese'. 'Chili' is either an alternate spelling for the peppers, but more commonly in the US, it's a dish made from meat, tomatoes and ...


8

Use a metal wire strainer turned upside down in a larger cooking pot so that the tomatillos can bob around in the water but always be under the surface. If for some reason the strainer doesn't stay down under the water, put some weight on the top.


7

The Pico de Gallo I make (plum tomatoes, white onion, fresh jalapeno peppers, lime juice, a tiny bit of olive oil and chopped fresh cilantro, salt and pepper) will last approximately 1 week if kept in a sealed container in the refrigerator. Over that time the tomatoes will get a little mushy and the cilantro will wilt. Perhaps you can have everything else ...


7

I think what you are seeing is marketing speak. Many different manufacturers put out similar products but may call them by different names. From what I've seen, guacamole, guacamole dip, and avocado dip are pretty much synonymous. They can all be used as a dip or condiment. There will be differences, e.g. one may taste slightly different than another or ...


6

The most important and easy thing to do with any tortilla before folding it is to warm the tortilla to make it supple and not to crack. (The same is true for enchiladas and tacos.) The best warming is over a range/stove burner (open flame or electric). Just keep rotating the tortilla until it is no longer stiff. Then stuff it right away while it's still ...


6

I've lived in Austin for 15+ years, I lived a couple miles from the TX-Mexico border until I was nine years old. I have prepared many salsas at home and tasted many at restaurants and homes. My general advice on salsa is: Pick a base (Tomato or Tomatillo (or both!)) Add onion and/or garlic. Add dried or fresh chiles (e.g., guajillo, ancho, chipotle or ...


6

This might be an old question but I still stumbled on it and figured others would too, so it's still worth answering. Difference: The grind makes all the difference. Pre-made masa for tortillas doesn't have lard mixed into it. It's just finely ground and mixed with water to make the dough. Great for tortillas. Pre-made masa for tamales is very light and ...


6

If I remember correctly, flautas are made with a softer flour tortilla while taquitos are made with a harder corn tortilla. Both are filled with similar fillings and then wrapped and deep fried. However, you can oftentimes find taquitos made from flour tortillas and flautas made from corn tortillas...so what's the deal? There is another differentiation: ...


6

Some recipes might be pickier, but Mexican rice is almost certainly the kind of thing where the broth is just there to add a bit of background flavor, and it doesn't have to be specifically chicken. So you can be pretty flexible. Your primary options are: Use a different kind of pre-made broth. They'll all work for something like that, just provide slightly ...


5

Salsa in Mexico is normally what you would call a spicy hot dressing that you put on the table so people can serve themselves and spread it over their dishes or inside their tacos. As we do it in the center of Mexico it must be very (spicy) hot. There are different kinds: fresh, cooked: boiled, grilled. The most commonly used fresh salsa is the pico de ...


5

I know this is a very old thread, but I'll throw in my 2 cents as I've been trying to solve this problem with mushy enchiladas for a long time! I think it was maybe last year when I read America's Test Kitchen (they have a show on PBS) reviews of corn tortillas. One thing they mentioned was that in their testing of numerous brands, they found one that didn'...


5

I'm not sure I've ever seen chipotle paste called for in recipes; I searched around a bit and what I found was consistent with my experience. I saw chipotle en adobo, ground chipotle, and even whole dried chipotle. I also easily found recipes for chipotle en adobo. I don't think you'll have any trouble figuring out what to do with them. The most common way ...


5

If you have a pressure cooker, you can shorten the time to cook the beans by using it. You will find many recipes and articles by googling "beans pressure cooker", such as this recipe posted on Serious Eats for refried beans, or this recipe for Boston Baked Beans, again courtesy of Serious Eats. However, without a pressure cooker, you cannot increase the ...


5

Kenji Alt has devoted one of his Food Lab columns to carnitas. The key to his method is he cooks the pork in a manner akin to confit, under fat in the oven. This low and slow method makes it tender and flavorful. Then, he broils it before service to crisp up.


5

In the US, generallly: Flautas : flour tortilla Taquitos : corn tortilla In Mexico: Flautas : corn tortilla Chimichangas : flour tortilla The term taquitos isn't used in Mexico, unless we're talking about a randomly small taco.


5

Acid is your friend here. You have some lemon, and tomatoes are acidic, but apparently that isn't enough. You should get at least a good week out of fresh salsa (mine lasts longer than that). Try adding a good shot of plain, distilled vinegar. Many recipes for salsa (including my own) include vinegar; add as much as you can without negatively affecting the ...


5

Translated to English, queso means cheese. There are many kinds of Mexican cheeses and most are widely available. The popular cheese dip, chile con queso, is melted cheese with chile peppers. Some where along the way, it became a 'thing' to simply call it queso. From Bon appétit : Get your mind out of the bowl of gooey Tex-Mex dip. When we say queso, ...


4

There is no substitute here. You can use something else to give you a red/orange color, but annatto seed is the main ingredient and main flavor in achiote paste, so if you replace it, you aren't making achiote paste - you are making a different, possibly tasty paste. It would be the equivalent of saying "what can I use instead of tomatoes in tomato sauce?"


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