22

An enchilada is a corn tortilla wrapped around some filling (often meat and/or cheese), covered in sauce. The sauce is really defining here: the word is derived from a verb meaning "to season with chili". The sauce usually involves chili peppers, but doesn't always, especially for Tex-Mex and American Variants. Since it's covered in sauce, you eat it off a ...


17

You need to warm them up a bit. There are a number of ways to do this 20 or 30 seconds on a griddle (or a comal if you have one) wrap a stack in foil and place in 325 oven for until warm wrap a stack in a clean towel and steam them using a steamer slightly moisten a towel and wrap it around a stack and microwave them for a bit If you've warmed them and ...


17

Quesadilla comes from queso, cheese, and that is mostly what goes in there. Maybe some jalapeños or onions, but that's really it. In a burrito you'd add much more, both volume and variety, for example meat, rice, avocado, cream, cheese, chiles, and beans. As far as I know the quesadilla goes in the pan on heat, whereas a burrito does not get heated after ...


14

The origin of chili con carne is actually from the American southwest, not Mexico. It's tex-mex, not mex. There are many variations on chili con carne, however if you go back to the earliest known recipes cocoa or chocolate are not on them. It's pretty basic, flavored mostly by cumin and chili. So if you want to make the most authentic chili to the origin ...


12

Potatoes are very popular in some parts of Mexico. When I lived in Guadalajara, potato tacos were common, usually deep-fried. Diced (and possibly pre-cooked) potatoes with some seasoning added to a soft taco shell, then the entire thing fried together until crispy. After frying, such tacos (whether with potatoes or other filling) were cracked open to add ...


12

Enchiladas are normally shredded meat and/or cheese rolled in corn tortillas, covered in red (or green) enchilada sauce and cheese, and then baked. Fajitas are normally strips of meat either grilled or sauteed (often with onions and peppers). They can be used in tacos, burritos, or served on their own or with tortillas on the side (corn or flour depending ...


12

By far the easiest way to make flat quesadillas is just to use two tortillas, like a sandwich. No worries about folding things up that way. If you want the folded in half or folded in thirds kind, the main things to keep in mind are that you want nice big flexible tortillas, and you don't want to overfill it. That should let you fold it fairly easily, and ...


12

Mole is often made with unsweetened chocolate or cocoa powder. No added sugars are involved. (There is a tiny amount of natural sugar in the cacao, about 1%.) Chocolate is not absolutely necessary in mole. Mole verde generally does not contain chocolate; some recipes for mole rojo also leave it out. You could simply leave out the cocoa from a mole recipe, ...


12

Part of the problem is that "salsa" doesn't mean just one thing to everyone. If you do a web search for "avocado salsa" you get images ranging from liquid to chunky: Similarly, there's no one "correct" way to make guacamole. Some people like it smooth and thick - hummus-like, if you will, other people like it partially mashed and partially chunky... almost ...


11

You're correct - it's a myth, as is adding something acidic to it like lemon juice--see explanation here. As you said, what causes it to brown is the oxidation, and that's just exposure to the air. If you wrap a cut avocado (or guacamole) in plastic wrap so there's no air space between the wrap and the avocado, then it will stay green longer than areas where ...


11

I think you have three options. Mole doesn't require chocolate. Find a recipe that doesn't have any. This recipe on Epicurious doesn't have chocolate, though they address that by noting that their inclusion of ancho chiles gives the chocolate flavor (I haven't tried any of these recipes, so don't take this as endorsement of them). Ancho chiles — large, ...


10

If possible, don't buy your tortillas from a modern super market, but look for a source of homemade/fresh tortillas. These can be found in many cities in the U.S. at Mexican or Latin American stores or neighboroods. Perhaps check your yellow pages for "Tortilleria" (The spanish word for "Tortilla Store"). These tortillas will also taste much better (at ...


10

I found a link that will provide the explanation you are looking for: http://www.mymexicanrecipes.com/ingredients/masa-harina.html Here is a direct quote from the site: Masa is dried corn that has been cooked in limewater (cal), soaked overnight, and then ground up while still wet. Sold in this form, it's called fresh masa, and it makes the lightest, ...


10

You probably want to just use already-cooked beans, from a can. (Hope there's a store nearby.) Then you just have to cook as long as it takes to let the flavors mingle; half an hour is plenty. If you happen to have a pressure cooker, you can cook dried beans much faster, something like 20-30 minutes. See for example this recipe - you can add back in ...


9

I have read all the suggestions and have decided that there is no "One size fits all" answer...just common sense. If you are concerned about sodium/sugar -Rinse. If the liquid turns you off - Drain/Rinse. If you are putting them in a salad or dry dish - Rinse/Drain. When using canned beans in Chili, Soup, or any dish requiring liquid - Draining/Rinsing ...


9

The flavor is described as being very mild and unless the recipe calls for a ton of the stuff it is probably being used mostly for color. The color it gives is a yellow-orange. Substitutions used are turmeric, paprika, or a mixture of the two. It was often used itself as a substitution for saffron but of course saffron would be too expensive to make the ...


8

They're commonly called squash blossoms in English - as you might guess, this is because it doesn't matter too much what kind of squash they're from. They'll most commonly be from smaller summer squash plants (e.g. zucchini) though, since they produce many small squash instead of a few large squash (like pumpkins), so you can get more blossoms for your ...


8

Taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco_burrito Two key technologies that made the San Francisco burrito possible are the large flour tortilla and tortilla steamers, which together increase the flexibility, stretch, and size of the resulting tortilla. The tortilla steamer saturates the gluten-heavy tortilla with moisture and heat, ...


8

Google is correct, in that it can be a shortening of 'chile con queso' (most typically in the US to non-spanish speakers). But 'chile' is not the same as 'chili'. 'Chile' refers to peppers, so the dip is 'peppers with cheese'. 'Chili' is either an alternate spelling for the peppers, but more commonly in the US, it's a dish made from meat, tomatoes and ...


8

Use a metal wire strainer turned upside down in a larger cooking pot so that the tomatillos can bob around in the water but always be under the surface. If for some reason the strainer doesn't stay down under the water, put some weight on the top.


7

I wouldn't trust any store brand to omit seeds entirely; it's just not going to be a priority for them. I'd suggest making your own instead. It's fairly easy and fast to seed tomatoes using a chinois, and to seed peppers using a knife. And it'll taste better, too! BTW, many online medical authorities seem to think that seeds are not actually an issue ...


7

We call those sandwiches guajolotes [*]; they are specific to to Tulancingo. One of the typical foods of the Tulancingo region are los guajolotes: buns (similar to a white bread baguette) are halved, filled with refried beans, cheese enchiladas, onions, and salsa. Guajolotes may also sometimes include meat, such as: shredded chicken, ham, sausage, or ...


7

The Pico de Gallo I make (plum tomatoes, white onion, fresh jalapeno peppers, lime juice, a tiny bit of olive oil and chopped fresh cilantro, salt and pepper) will last approximately 1 week if kept in a sealed container in the refrigerator. Over that time the tomatoes will get a little mushy and the cilantro will wilt. Perhaps you can have everything else ...


7

I think what you are seeing is marketing speak. Many different manufacturers put out similar products but may call them by different names. From what I've seen, guacamole, guacamole dip, and avocado dip are pretty much synonymous. They can all be used as a dip or condiment. There will be differences, e.g. one may taste slightly different than another or ...


6

The most important and easy thing to do with any tortilla before folding it is to warm the tortilla to make it supple and not to crack. (The same is true for enchiladas and tacos.) The best warming is over a range/stove burner (open flame or electric). Just keep rotating the tortilla until it is no longer stiff. Then stuff it right away while it's still ...


6

I've lived in Austin for 15+ years, I lived a couple miles from the TX-Mexico border until I was nine years old. I have prepared many salsas at home and tasted many at restaurants and homes. My general advice on salsa is: Pick a base (Tomato or Tomatillo (or both!)) Add onion and/or garlic. Add dried or fresh chiles (e.g., guajillo, ancho, chipotle or ...


6

I would steam them, let them cool, then freeze them. If you buy them in large quantites from a vendor or from a fund raiser or something, they come already steamed. As for prep, I would think the microwave is the best answer, as that ought to keep them nice and moist while they are cooking. Steaming them again would probably work, but might take a while. ...


6

Tasting the peppers is absolutely the only way, short of a chromatography machine. This is especially true for jalapeños from grocery. This because, as stated on this site here and in other answers by myself and others, pepper spiciness can vary greatly even on the same plant. Accordingly, chiles mixed possibly from plants, even from different harvests or ...


6

I have made refried beans out of pinto, small red, black, and even navy beans. I almost tried using kidney beans once but it seemed wasteful. They were all different in texture but they were all good. Black beans, for example, have a much more fibrous skin so the refried beans are not as smooth- I actually prefer it to the homogeneous pinto mash. Obviously ...


6

This might be an old question but I still stumbled on it and figured others would too, so it's still worth answering. Difference: The grind makes all the difference. Pre-made masa for tortillas doesn't have lard mixed into it. It's just finely ground and mixed with water to make the dough. Great for tortillas. Pre-made masa for tamales is very light and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible