46

There is one very different issue to be kept in mind - water in a microwave can overheat and "explode" once it is disturbed. Another poster had exactly this problem a short while ago: Water exploded in Microwave So follow the usual precautions, e.g. putting a wooden toothpick or a small, very clean stone (chemists have them in their labs) in your vessel. ...


41

This probably refers to whole eggs mostly... A microwave can boil water very rapidly, and a tight but fragile container like a whole egg will violently rupture if such rapid boiling happens inside it, because the overpressure inside it is already significant when the shell finally breaks. Here is a video showing an experiment with ca. 180 eggs in a ...


41

Metal has a lot of potential issues in the microwave (electric charge buildup + arcing, and microwave reflection). There are too many variables to make general statements like "such-and-such metal is safe" or "smooth objects are safe" with confidence, hence the sweeping guaranteed-safe blanket advice to not put metal in the microwave. The reason it didn't ...


35

After I found the pack of microwave popcorn again I decided to do a quick search on the English web. I found that the corn in the bag is just normal popcorn mixed with some fake butter and that there'd be no issues popping it on the stove. Then I looked for good ways of popping corn on a stove and found an excellent video with step-by-step instructions. ...


33

I think the primary considerations are convenience (how much effort is it to set up and use the system?) and time spent (how long does the system take to heat the water?). A standard electric stove can have 2500W elements, and most of this energy will go into a kettle sitting on the element and thus heat the water. Even a big built-in microwave won't be ...


33

Bear in mind that I'm using an electric kettle, rather than a stove-top one. First, the advantage of a kettle is that it is quite efficient, and turns itself off once the water is boiling. This as opposed to the microwave, which only stops after a set time, rather than relying on the condition of the water. Second, a microwave can cause water to superheat,...


31

It has nothing to do with the microwave and everything to do with the volatility of aromas and flavors in coffee. Even coffee kept warm for 4 hours won't taste very good. In my experience, stale brewed coffee results in a more pronounced acidity, if left out to cool, or a woody, muddy, bitter kind of flavor, sometimes with more pronounced acidity, if held ...


31

Spoons (most metal, in fact) are generally not a huge problem in the microwave. My microwave has metal parts...many do. Forks are sometimes a problem due to a build up of charge between the tines, which could result in sparks. As you note, shape can be a factor. The shape of spoons spreads the charge, the pointy edges of forks and narrow tines could ...


24

Well, I can tell you with absolute authority that polystyrene melts in the microwave. Here's a chunk of polystyrene cut from a foam shipping container. I double checked with the website (Propak), and the stuff is polystyrene. I placed a random chunk of chicken on the cube, and microwaved on high for 1 minute. So yeah, it melts. Is it toxic if it melts ...


23

As someone who tried this out at a young age, I thoroughly DO recommend it! The microwave makes a huge bang and jumps 2 inches off the bench. Good times! (However, you need to do some heavy duty cleaning before mum gets home.) However, by breaking another rule, you can boil an egg in a microwave. Steps: 2/3 fill a coffee cup with boiling water. Wrap ...


21

There are actually two things worth considering with metal in microwaves. The big danger is arcing and that happens with pointy things like forks and apparently grapes. It's also worth considering, being in a plastic box, there was nowhere for the spark to jump to. With a fork there's a small enough spark gap for current to jump. With a spoon, there is not. ...


20

I'll go ahead and take a stab at answering this, even though the question is a bit vague. I assume by "cook" you mean "cook with a non-microwave method", like boiling, steaming, baking, frying, sauteeing, or anything else. First of all, no, I can't think of any reason why microwaves would be worse than any other cooking method. If you fully cook something ...


18

Most likely the flatbread is not very pliable when cold. I believe that Subway forces the heating of the flatbread to keep it from splitting when they fold it.


17

The spark was a voltage jumping over a gap somewhere. This may occur again, but so long as the magnetron survives, you should be okay. The problem with sparks is they can leave a carbon trail deep inside which is conductive and may actually make the next spark occur at a slightly lower voltage. If this happens enough, you will eventually (or shortly) damage ...


16

Whenever something gets hot in a microwave, it indicates the presence of water. If something that used to stay cool suddenly heats up, you have water present where previously there was none. I assume you are using a glazed ceramic mug or jar, not one made of glass. Your glazing must have tiny cracks in it, that allow water to reach the clay underneath and ...


15

A better instruction would be "do not rely entirely on the functionality of the popcorn button on your microwave, since microwaves vary widely as do bags of popcorn." But that's longer, and kind of complicated, so they abbreviate it "do not use popcorn button". There's no problem with the power setting of the popcorn button, only with the timing. You should ...


15

It is impossible to convert Microwaves into Celsius or Fahrenheit. Temperature(Celsius): Temperature is a measure of the average translational kinetic energy of the molecules of a system. Heat is commonly expressed in either of two units: the calorie, an older metric unit, and the British thermal unit (Btu), an English unit commonly used in the United ...


14

Yes, there is a difference. You shouldn't be baking a cake (or anything else) in a microwave oven. A microwave oven excites the water within your food. When you put in dough or batter, the excited water doesn't bind with the starch the way it does under normal heat, it escapes the starch, leaving you with a stone-hard piece of dough or batter. There is ...


14

When you boil water in a cup in a microwave, it will often boil without forming bubbles, because unlike a kettle with a rough heating element or inner surface, a clean ceramic cup has few nucleation points. Nucleation points allow pockets of gas to form, which become bubbles as the water boils. When you add the teabag to the hot water, you are essentially ...


14

Joe is essentially right. Bubbles form in a liquid at what are called nucleation sites - small irregularies in the container or in the liquid itself. If you look at the bottom of some beer glasses, there are little nodules (often in the shape of the brewer's logo) that nucleate bubbles of the CO2 that's dissolved in the beer. Much the same occurs with ...


14

First off, the terminology issue. So, can someone please clear up this fog? What's the difference between Microwave and Oven and Microwave Oven? "Microwave" is just short for "microwave oven". Both terms mean the same thing: an appliance that uses microwave radiation to heat food. Cooking food in this way is called "microwaving". An oven, on the other ...


14

Your microwave isn't exactly cooking your food from the inside out. Instead, what is happening is that some parts of your food that happen to be on the interior are being heated faster than those parts of the exterior that you observe. This sort of uneven heating is intrinsic with how microwaves work. Microwave ovens cook unevenly because a pattern of ...


13

Poke them with a fork in a few places. This will let the steam out in a controlled manner and prevent bursting. or, even better, skip the microwave and boil them in a pan over the stove.


13

A simple undamaged raw egg in a microwave at full power will explode. Unless you have a deep desire to thoroughly scrub your microwave I can not recommend that approach. The problem is that the egg will be heated to more than 100C, that means the water will start to vaporize and steam has the nasty habit of needing way more room than liquid, and you get a ...


12

Consider the humble supermarket pita. The kind with the ridiculously long shelf life. Straight from the packet, it's pretty miserable. It's chewy - not in a good way. It tastes of cardboard. Toast it however, and it comes to life. The slight browning of the outside improves the flavour. The steaming of the inside softens the bread inside. I'll bet the ...


12

Microwaves specifically heat water molecules in the food. This turns them to steam, and because the air in the microwave is actually cool, the steam then condenses. There is often not proper air circulation to move the steam away from the food. Often times the outside edges of the food will not be soggy, but rather burnt, because they receive more energy and ...


12

For different food types there is no single correct answer, as it is very dependent on the specific microwave energy absorption and reflectance characteristics of each item (food and container) in the microwave oven It's possible to put one item in which has a high absorbency and one with a low absorbency, and to have one fully cooked and the other still ...


12

Microwave ovens do not cook food very evenly. This is improved by the turntable, but unless the food is stir-able and you stir it, the food will have hot and cold spots. Most people seem to overcook food and then let it rest for the heat to even out Most other cooking methods are slower than microwave cooking, so this give time for heat to conduct through ...


12

Here is a list of common plastics found in kitchen containers. You will find this information on the bottom of the container, in a triangle with a number inside. While some plastics used in microwavable applications appear to have a high melting point, PET for instance melts at 510ºF, please remember that the material will soften, weaken and otherwise ...


11

Microwaves do not kill bacteria, heat kills bacteria. The higher the temperature, the faster those bacteria will die off. "Instant death" for most bacteria (including salmonella) is about 160° F (71° C). You only need a few seconds at this temperature. The notoriously strict USDA recommends 160° F for egg dishes but is considerably more lax about whole eggs ...


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