79

The piece of cardboard is a microwave browning element. Ordinarily, most of the heating energy in a microwave is absorbed by water in the food. The result is similar to steaming. The material on the cardboard is designed to absorb microwave radiation and convert it into heat, attaining a higher temperature than boiling water would reach, to allow the bottom ...


32

Oh lordy. You're lucky you didn't get hurt. Ann Reordan did a good video about these microwave egg hacks. The segment with her many experiments starts around 6:00. (other hacks/myths are at the beginning and end of the video.) https://youtu.be/vdaKrT9x1Zc Short version: it's speculated that the microwave super-heats the interior of the egg and the internal ...


31

With all electromagnetic radiation, including visible light and microwaves, absorption depends on the molecules doing the absorption. Air is mainly oxygen and nitrogen, and these don't absorb very well at the 2.4GHz frequency used in microwaves, while foods do. A lot of this is down to the very efficient absorption by water, and almost all foodstuffs ...


22

Popcorn should be considered one of "nature's little miracles" - & a way to make a huge profit out of air. Yes, you can pop other dried grains/seeds, but don't expect anything quite so bag-filling as maize. Quinoa, chia, sorghum & amaranth will all pop [in a dry pan, not sure about microwave] See https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/...


21

In 2017 researchers from Charles M. Salter Associates in San Francisco looked into the exploding microwaved eggs. They'd been hired to offer testimony in litigation of a case where a consumer claimed an exploding egg had damaged his hearing, so their focus was on how loud the eggs were, but they also offered a possible explanation as for the reason of the ...


8

The problem with sprinking herbs on the top, would be that the container of water can be superheated at the bottom and not superheated at the top. (In fact, the top tends to be much cooler than the bottom, because of evaporation.)


5

Popcorn doesn't pop particularly well in the microwave oven. The bag the popcorn is in has a little metal patch to make it work better. You can't just throw popcorn in the microwave and pop it. Hot air poppers and popping corn in hot oil work better. Popcorn pops because it has a tough shell and a little spot of moisture in the center of the kernel. If ...


4

I think this is what you are looking for. It's called a "micro-go-round", as you can see from the picture. Simply search for "spring loaded microwave turntable."


4

Yes, you can cook potatoes in a microwave. If you have not cut them up, poke a few holes in the side with a fork or knife point to allow steam to escape.


4

A major factor to note is that to get the corn syrup to 394K you don't just have to heat it, you have to concentrate it by boiling off some of the water. You need to take into account the latent heat of vaporisation of water, about 2,260 kJ/kg in the temperature range of interest. It's easy to see that this can be a major factor. Hard ball candy is 90% ...


4

I recommend looking at studies conducted in a scientific manner, instead of relying on anecdotal evidence. The link below covers a pretty good effort by graduate students, concludes microwaving is good. However, if you are having fun doing the blanching, then do it. Being happy and sharing your cooking with appreciative guests is a great way to spend a ...


4

Three reasons: The microwave oven itself is lighter than the conventional oven, and putting the lighter item at the top makes good construction sense, especially for freestanding oven/range/microwave units. Such freestanding combo units were a lot more common in the early days of home microwaves, so folks got used to that configuration. The space over the ...


3

Microwaves are actually lower energy photons than even visible light. So they don't cook because they carry high amounts of energy per photon, to impart to whatever they touch. They cook for one reason only: they might be lower energy, but water and some other food molecules are electric dipoles (meaning their structure puts distinct positive and negative ...


2

Years passed since the question was asked, but finally mainstream chefs do recommend microwaving food. David Chang in particular - he even came up with a cookware line for microwave. In this interview, he says I’d suggest cooking vegetables in your microwave. You’ll be amazed at how perfectly and fast they cook, all while staying crisp and delicious. ...


2

Every material (air, water, metal, plastic...) are more or less conductive and proportionally more or less absorbent of radiowave. The more it absorbs the less material it needs to absorb a significant amount (let say 90%) of the wave energy. For a given frequency and a given material you can calculate the amount of material you need to catch a given ...


2

In the past I made such a mistake multiple times with the same microwave... the one I still use to this day. So if the sparks from the golden part of your mug was the only incident, I believe your microwave is just fine.


2

Well, technically speaking the microwave frequency range is actually from 300MHz (or 0.3GHz) to 300GHz, so considering the examples provided and the frequencies in question I'm going to assume a Heating/Drying Industry context; because in reality, higher frequencies are used in other industries like space or communications. (source 1, source 2) That being ...


2

In general, microwave meals are designed to be cooked to a safe temperature throughout, even when a microwave barely puts out the rated power, and that unevenly. This means the meals are designed to handle overcooking. Anyway power ratings are fairly inaccurate as they depend on how well the microwave radiation couples into the food - ratings are based ...


2

Honestly, I'd go the trial-and-error route with that if you are going to do this for practical applications (e.g. guesstimating how long you need to put your syrup in the microwave) If you want to actually build an accurate mathematical model, some things you should be taking into account: 1000W is the nominal potency of the microwave, not exactly the amount ...


1

Simple answer The same equation, because the power or wattage between both your microwave and the reference/recipe microwave are close enough that your formula would be a decent estimate of time with some "tolerable" error (and will work for any case this happens). Technically speaking this means you just estimated cooking time by thinking it would ...


1

The problem here is the way that microwaves work. Instead of heating your food evenly, they heat small pockets of your food to very high temperatures, while leaving the rest of the food cold. If the superheated food touches the cover, it will melt the plastic. So, there are a few things you can do to avoid that. Don't let the cover touch the food. Heat your ...


1

I'm no plastics expert but a general rule of thumb is the softer the plastic initially, the more likely it is to melt (I know that sound too obvious, but hey;) Something to do with thermoset vs thermoplastic. The trouble with plastics being advertised as microwave-safe is it is a limited claim. If you microwave a bowl of water covered by the lid, then you're ...


1

"Oven" is probably the wrong word to use. Industrial microwave heating systems are used in many manufacturing processes that may not have anything to do with food preparation. Industrial heating systems may be much larger than a residential oven, or may not resemble a residential oven at all. They may be part of a continuous manufacturing process ...


1

While I can't talk directly to the idea of adding air to a starch, I can mention some experiments I have done. Perhaps you could try whipping your starch mix before dehydrating to capture and trap some air. Note that many puffed cereals are puffed due to the expanding action of steam due to small amounts of water (puffed rice, prawn crackers, popcorn). I ...


1

If you stir it vigorously with a whisk for about three minutes while hot it will recover


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