29

I suspect that these will be pickled almonds. Almonds are a favorite ingredient in many middle-Eastern dishes. The green color and fuzz give it away, most other fruits like apricots and plums lack enough fuzz to be noticeable at the unripe stage and are very hard when unripe. I found a recipe with this photo: Are these are what you are after?


12

It's probably green almonds like bob1 suggested. We eat them raw as a fruit or they can be pickled. They are called Oja in the Syrian region عوجا.


6

The recipe calls for simmering 30 mins, baking 30 mins, resting 10 mins. This isn't quite an accurate representation of the recipe. The recipe calls for baking cauliflower and eggplant for 20 minutes each prior to assembly. Once assembled, the rice gets simmered for 30 minutes. Then the completed dish rests for 10 minutes. The cook times will likely not ...


4

It's really better to work in weight especially when cooking with different types of sugar. Trying to change the fineness of sugar, and the sugar chemistry, and then make up for it with adjusting volumes is prone to failure. Halva is easy to make but hard to get the right consistency. My last lot ended up too soft/sticky. But it's ill-defined: different ...


4

The question seems to confuse some terminology. Let's first clear some things up. Bulgur is NOT a grind size. It is a process. "Bulgur wheat" (in English anyway) refers to whole or cracked or crushed wheat berries that are parboiled and then dried. There are various sizes of bulgur sometimes available (e.g., coarse, medium, fine, etc., or sometimes ...


3

I speak European languages only, and have shopped in several European countries (although, I admit, in some of my vacation destinations, I didn't make it to the grains aisle). In these languages and countries, wheat ground to the size you are asking for is used for one thing only: to cook couscous. It is never encountered in any other context. Also, the ...


3

Well I am Lebanese, and there is few small steps to make a good authentic Lebanese bread that looks like that: There is another type of bread called Saj Bread: Here is a video about it. Another type of bread is the tanour bread, where an indian tandour is used to make the bread. Well Lebanese and most of levant countries think that the tandour is their ...


2

Try it & see ;) Aleppo isn't particularly hot; I haven't checked it on the Scoville scale, but just from experience, though it's got a little kick to it, & that kick can be quite variable depending on your source of the pepper, to me, aleppo is used for its flavour rather than its kick. Cayenne, on the other hand, I always consider to be "free heat"...


1

In Jordan, we have a universally used spice mix that is consumed throughout the country. I don’t know of “allspice” being part of this mix, so I theorize that it’s somewhat of a misnomer. What I mean is that, in the Levant, our spice mix may sometimes be referred to as “allspice” but it’s not necessarily a reference to this particular plant.


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