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268

The electric kettle is (clearly) not designed for this. The main issue is that milk doesn't evaporate, whereas water (obviously) does. The secondary reason is that milk will burn. Milk is a complex mixture of water, fats, and proteins. The fats and proteins will separate out from the water when heated, and form a layer on top. Unfortunately, this layer ...


104

One reason is simple appearance, I think - opaque white liquids or saps have long been called "milky", including nut milks, coconut milk, dandelion or milk thistle saps, and several other white substances. Nut milks get called milk because they look like milk to the eye. Another reason is that nut milks behave like milks in recipes - they are emulsions ...


63

The cleaning is one thing (there are flasks without hidden crevices that can be easily cleaned), but there’s also another point to consider: A thermos flask that is doing its job will keep food warm, or rather, slow down the cooling process. Even if you fill it with fairly hot liquid, it will slowly cool. If you do that with a perishable food like milk, you ...


48

There is no safety issue with adding cold milk foam to hot coffee. Coffee aficionados recommend against adding cold milk to hot coffee, because they suggest it compromises the flavor of freshly brewed coffee. Their recommendation is that any milk, foam or not, should be warmed, but it is not a food safety issue.


41

I would invest in a small thermos bottle, about the size of what you need for one day. They are not only designed to keep hot food hot, they can also keep cold food cold. Choose a size that will be as full as possible when you start, it will keep better. This is what the small B&B we‘re currently staying at supplies to their guests. If it’s good for an ...


38

Milk goes bad because it gets colonized by bacteria. There are two sources for this bacteria; ones already present in the milk because pasteurization didn't kill them, and from the environment (that is, bacteria in your fridge). The "expiration date" for milk is therefore a conservative estimate of the time when the milk might start turning bad. ...


37

Dry powders are easier to mix if you make a slurry first with a small amount of liquid and then mix the slurry in. If you skip this step you will have clumps of dry powder floating on top of the milk and it will take a lot more effort to mix in. When you are using yoghurt as a starter for a new batch this step is not necessary and the starter can just be ...


35

I consider "Milk" to be the substance secreted from living being to sustain their young, whether they be human, cow, dog, etc... Other people consider "milk" to have a wider definition than this. The Oxford English Dictionary (subscription required) gives a number of definitions of "milk" that are relevant to cooking: 1a. A ...


35

Your best bet for longevity is UHT milk - in individual portions. It's the same stuff you get in hotel rooms. Pic from Amazon, anonymised. Though it doesn't taste the same as 'real' milk it's virtually indestructible, almost inert, & will survive unopened & unrefrigerated for 6 - 9 months. As soon as it's opened, you have to treat it just like real ...


33

You don't need raw milk (or more precisely, raw cream). I've made butter from cream many times, but never from unpasteurized cream -- I prefer locally sourced organic cream for reasons, but the actual butter-making process is exactly the same with a pint of store-bought. If you are starting from milk rather than from cream, you will need to get non-...


28

There's no plausible mechanism that would make it unsafe. It's usually impractical though, since milk foams better when heated. Steaming it automatically heats the milk, and most mechanical ways of doing it work best if you heat the milk first. It's not quite cold foam on hot coffee, but one popular dessert in Italy is affogato. At its most basic, it is a ...


27

It's normal whole milk. 'sweet' was used to distinguish it from buttermilk in older cookbooks.


26

Fundamentally the answer is just 'it is added for flavour; you can skip it if you want'. A few suggestions as to why it might be a good decision to add it: Vanilla flavour can be stronger or weaker, and it might be that the recipe writer prefers their milkshake to have a stronger vanilla flavour than the ice cream they buy. Depending on how much milk is ...


25

It has been established in other answers that the kettle will likely burn the milk around the heating element. The reason why this might break the kettle is because it would lead to rapid overheating: the maximum temperature of water before it starts turning into steam is 100 C. The maximum temperature of char before it starts to sublimate is in the ...


23

Milk does create gluten1 when combined with flour. The water in the milk does create a gluten structure. If it didn't, any bread made with milk would be dense and flat. But the dinner rolls I made yesterday (with no water, only milk) were light and airy. Milk clearly creates gluten. Note that gluten isn't only about elasticity. Beginning bread makers ...


22

Double boiler. You can buy a purpose built double boiler and if you are going to do this often you should. But for now you can fake it the way I do. Here is my setup. The little saucepan is floating in the water that is in the larger pan. Because of the water, the temperature never gets higher than 100°C unless you boil all the water off. Milk at 100°C ...


18

I didn't notice an exact duplicate of this question anywhere, but it's quite common for canned coconut milk to separate leaving an opaque white solid layer of fat and solids, and a thin watery/syrup layer of cloudy coconut water. Coconut water is naturally a little tart, so I don't find that concerning. If the can is in date and showed no signs of swelling ...


16

I'm a bit of a coffee nut, having bought my own espresso machine & grinder and have been pulling my own shots and learning how to create different coffee drinks for some years now. I am by no means an expert, however: What you're seeing when the barista is swirling/tapping the milk jug is called "polishing". It's the step after they've steamed it and ...


16

It depends on the design. Some can't be washed properly, and milky liquids are much harder to clean off by rinsing than water or most water-based drinks My genuine Thermos brand flask wouldn't be a problem because all the surfaces that come into contact with the food are accessible. My previous small cheap flask had a pouring system in the lid that meant ...


16

In a similar situation in a previous job we successfully used an old camping trick: Wrap the bottle containing the day's milk in a damp cloth, and stand it in a bowl of water, in the draught from an open window. The evaporative cooling produced that way is really quite effective. Either buy a small bottle in the way in or transport it insulated. Another ...


16

I suppose it's unsafe in a way similar to drinking microwaved liquids: Customer may feel the cold foam and take a big sip, not immediately noticing that the coffee itself is boiling hot?


14

Yes, you can. I use the King Arthur Flour Small Pain de Mie recipe all the time http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/a-smaller-pain-de-mie-recipe, which calls for non-fat powdered milk. An answer to another question here Why is milk powder used in bread machine recipes? says to scald the milk, a concept reiterated by the folks at King Arthur. So as an ...


14

Something to be aware of is where the milk is from and how it's pasteurized. My store brand milk is local and pasteurized only, but some other brands are ultra pasteurized and expected to last much longer. I've experienced similar flukes in the past, generally with ultra-pasteurized milk.


13

When making lactose free milk, the lactose isn't actually removed. Instead, lactase is added to the milk. This breaks down the lactose into its component sugars, glucose and galactose. Lactose is one of the least sweet sugars, relative to sucrose (table sugar). Both glucose and galactose are significantly sweeter than the original lactose, hence why lactose ...


13

First off I want to point out the term "fresh". While some containers might keep milk from spoiling for longer, it may not taste as nice. Several things might be why: 1.) Plastics leach flavor and odor into the milk. Cardboard cartons are also lined with plastic, not wax since about the 1940s. I would say this is likely the biggest impact-- I've always ...


13

As an alternative to the (very good) vacuum bottle suggestions, Insulated lunchboxes with an ice-pack are great. My kids use them for school and the ice-pack is often still partially frozen at the end of the day, even when kept outside in hot weather. As a bonus, you can put your other snacks/lunch in there to keep cool as well.


12

It all depends on taste [of course]. Lower fat milk & yoghurt are sharper, more tangy, almost 'lemony'. High fat are rich, smooth & creamy. So, start with 'How tart do you like your lassi?' & work from there. Personally, I like lassi to have some 'bite' to it, so I'd go for zero-fat yoghurt & probably what in the UK would be called semi-...


12

There are a number of ways to cook milk without burning it. My personal favorite is to bake it. When baked according to my instructions, it does not overflow, and the bottom of the pan does not burn at all (the edge where the milk surface touches does get some milk protein cooked onto it, though). You do not have to do anything with it while it's baking. It ...


11

There is nothing you can add or do to your sauce to remove or mask the burnt taste. Really. Don't even try. Throw it out and start over, being careful not to burn it this time. For some foods, there are various tricks you can try for removing the burnt taste, but they all start with removing the burnt bits. With a sauce where you've already thoroughly ...


11

You're comparing different quantities. A serving of cream (per your label) is a tablespoon. You're comparing that to 1 cup (or 16 tablespoons) of milk. The percentage that you're seeing is not what percentage of your dairy product is fat, but the percentage of the recommended daily amount of that nutrient found in a single serving. % Daily Value is figured ...


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