Hot answers tagged

35

The "Ash" is not an ingredient in the flour To be clear, the "Ash" is a measure of what you'd get left - if you burned the flour. It is not an ingredient in the bag of flour. More specifically if you had 100g of flour - the "Ash" number is literally how much the Ash would weight if you burned all of it. As starch burns readily, what you'll be left with is ...


17

The amount of salt that would stick to a dry mill is very small. Salt is also quite abrasive, cheap and water soluble. So to get pepper out I'd grind salt. For most savoury mixes a little salt won't hurt -- in fact you may well put a fair bit in the mix. If you really want to remove the salt, then wash it; just be sure to get it really dry before ...


4

There's no special trick to it, you don't want to use water to clean them as it's hard to dry them afterwards and you risk getting wet spices clogging things up. First I would empty the mill, then I would give it a few taps and shake as much as can out of it. Next I would use a brush and/or paper towel to clean the parts I can reach. Once it's as clean as I ...


4

That's a nice picture of a spinning blade type spice grinder you have there. The good ones will even do whole nutmegs. You can also use it to make limited quantities of powdered sugar, oat flour, wheat flour, buckwheat flour etc. About any non-oily seed may be turned into a powder with that grinder. Trying to make peanut butter is a mistake. It goos up the ...


3

Soak the groats in water for a few hours. Drain and dry. Use your fingers to peel off the hulls. Oatmeal typically is cut into three pieces, so try using a nut chopper device - the one with the glass container over a steel chopper that is manipulated by your hand pressing down. Using a blender creates a flour, as you posted, and that is lovely for special ...


3

Seems like you should consider investing in a grain mill. They come in a wide variety of options from manual to electric and they have different settings for how fine a grind you can get. While many of them may not grind as coarse as needed for cereals, there are many, particularly the manual mills, that do. You probably want a burr-style mill... they're ...


3

How about an old "Ringer" clothes washing machine? I was just at a sorghum making demo yesterday and the machine reminded me of a ringer washing machine - just bigger.


3

It sounds like you are doing it wrong! :) Grind spices in a spice grinder first (a rotary coffee grinder works fine for that). See How do you finely grind coriander seeds? Garlic, ginger, fresh herbs and coconut are fine in a small bowl of a food processor, but they need some time and a few restarts after cleaning the sides of the bowl with a spatula. ...


2

Thank you, Andrew for your reply and link. In the meanwhile I decided to try and see for myself. I put some buckwheat on a flat surface in the oven for about 30 min. I took the same amount of buckwheat and left it as is. Then I tried milling the two batches. The oven batch yielded flour much more quickly than the other, untreated batch. One other suggested ...


2

Using ovens as a dehydrator is pretty universal for any kind of food that can be dried. Here is just one of many sites out there - How to make sprouted grain flour


2

From what I've heard you might be able to if your oven can be set on 170 degrees Fahrenheit and left propped open with a wooden spoon or something so the air escapes better


2

Though I've never ground wheat, I've used metal and ceramic mills to grind spices, rice, and nuts. As far as I know you'll usually find either ceramic or steel burrs. Steel burrs though usually stainless steel, can still corrode depending on the type of steel used. Where as you typically want a harder steel for mills, you also want something corrosive ...


2

I was looking for something like that: http://lifehacker.com/5558040/use-rice-or-bread-to-clean-coffee-and-spice-grinders I´ll try today, if milling rice will solve my problem.. And I´ll tell you as soon as I tried, if that is valuable..


2

The advantage of a passaverdura (or passe-vite in French, also known as Foley Mill in the US) is that like you said it will, depending on the coarseness of the screen, keep back undesired matter, such as pips, skins and strings. Personally, I use it mostly for apple sauce and also mashed potatoes (they achieve a higher level of fluff and fineness than with a ...


1

Grains would typically be dried for storage so that they remain dormant and don't sprout or mold. Assuming you're storing them in a sealed container and your ambient humidity isn't ridiculously high, this is probably dry enough for your purposes. Just don't wash or soak the grains without drying them thoroughly. There's also going to be a small amount of ...


1

If the recipe can handle it (eg for spice pastes that will be sauteed with other ingredients anyway): Try adding oil instead of water.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible