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67

Peppermint is a hybrid breed of two plants belonging to the mint genus, spearmint and watermint. In my experience, when 'mint' is referred to by itself without any other descriptors, it usually refers to the spearmint flavour people are used to (from things like green restaurant mint candies, toothpaste, etc). Peppermint will be denoted as peppermint. ...


16

Mint is the genus of the herb, peppermint and spearmint are two subsets. Spearmint is milder and more classically European, peppermint is rather more aggressive, and much more popular in the US (where it's usually labelled as just 'mint'). Those are the two main subsets. You can substitute one for the other, but you will lose the characteristic flavor of ...


15

Why Alcohol? Alcohol is used for extracts because the flavor compounds (plant oils) you are trying to extract do not easily dissolve in water. Alcohol (typically bourbon or vodka) will do the trick. Make sure you use +80 proof because it also acts as a preservative. Making Mint Extract To make an extract, tear up or coarsely chop and bruise washed mint ...


12

While it is true that there are a variety of mints, I think your biggest challenge is that it is "late in the season." I find that here (Philly, USA), in August, all of my herbs tend to develop a bitterness that is not there in spring and early summer. While it may be the variety, I don't think it is the age of the plant, as my mint comes back each year as ...


10

As far as I'm aware, the traditional Greek tzatziki doesn't generally include mint at all. It's a cucumber dip that is made of yogurt and sometimes includes dill or mint as a flavoring: Tzatziki (Anglicized: /tsɑːtˈsiːki/ }; Greek: τζατζίκι [dzaˈdzici] or [dʒaˈdʒici]) is a Greek sauce served with grilled meats or as a dip. Tzatziki is made of strained ...


9

The classic mistake when making a Mojito or a Julep is to over muddle the mint. Pounding away at the mint will release so much flavour from it, that you won't taste any of the other ingredients. A perfect Mojito should comprise a balance of flavours. The other main constituents do not have a particularly strong flavour, so its very easy to swamp them with ...


9

I think you might get better, less-grassy results by steeping the mint in the cream (heat the cream first) but not actually including the leaves in the ice cream. You want to get the aromatic oil to provide the mintiness, but leave out the actual greens which are making it grassy and herbal. Another option, as suggested in comments, would be to make a syrup ...


7

Mint chutney is normally almost all herbs (mint and cilantro), and it's ground/blended so it's completely green: (from this mint chutney recipe) I can't really see the chutney/dip in your picture that well. You say it was mint and yogurt, and it looks like it might be pale green, so I'd guess it just had overall more yogurt than usual. But as long as it's ...


6

Yes, many oils or lipids are dissolved in alcohol, whereas they cannot dissolve in water. This is why, for example, vanilla extract is based on alcohol. That would depend on the ratio of leaves to vodka, and how long you steeped. Probably no where near what commercial extracts are. It would be unlikely to be drinkable straight, since the flavor would ...


6

Well - not exactly. The reason that this technique works with lemons is that they actually do contain quite a bit of water. It's not so much "water-free" as it is using the residual water from the rinds and un-squeezed pips. Mint contains a lot less water by weight, so if you tried it in similar portions you'd wind up not with mint syrup, but with slightly-...


4

I recently asked this question to my dietitian friend at work, and she advised fruit/herbs last about 3 to 5 days in water in the fridge before becoming soft and mushy. If your mint leaf still looks nice and pretty, you are most likely OK. She also recommended a website to me: www.infusedwaters.com/faq for recipes and advise.


4

Harms? Meh, that's silliness. You can make your own fizzy water if you're so inclined. Sodamakers. If you really don't want fizzy, then just substitute still water in any of the recipes in a search for Virgin Mojitos. Choose recipes that use soda water, club soda or seltzer water, not ginger ale. Ginger ale adds flavor, you want recipes that stand without ...


3

There are absolutely no substitutes, neither cheap nor expensive. First, the cooling effect is due to a very rare coincidence. It so happens that menthol is chemically capable of activating one of the temperature receptors in human skin (also present in the lining of the mouth). There are no other substances which do the same thing, at least not ones known ...


3

This is a fun question, but your plan is not very practical. If you indeed insist on doing it, you have three steps in the process of menthol extraction: Extract the essential oil from the leaves Separate the essential oil from the solvent you used Freeze the menthol out of the essential oil. For the essential oil extraction, the only method doable at ...


3

Recipe requests are off-topic but I can solve your problem nonetheless: After Eights are filled with soft fondant, which is sugar, often glucose syrup and water boiled to the soft ball stage, then whiped. If you google "poured fondant" you should find enough recipes online.


3

I am assuming your couverture was real chocolate, since you haven't said. While I don't know the effect of alchohol on chocolate, small quantities of water can easily seize chocolate. It becomes a nasty, pasty, stiff mess. Typical 80 proof vodka would be 40% alcohol by volume, and so approximately 60% water, so your homemade extract would have had ...


3

You want to make a "mint infusion". Googling this will give you many recipes. Basically you brew the mint like herbal tea: Remove stems, Bruise the leaves a little, Add the leaves to a cup of very hot water, Let steep for a few minutes, strain and throw away the mushy leaves and use the liquid for your flavoring. The liquid will be brown as you are ...


3

Actually the right way to make a mojito is bruising the mint. A lot of bartenders just use a couple of stalks of mint and slap it. Mint (as some other herbs) have microscopic hair, which releases the aromas as soon as they are bruised. Muddling as correctly said will release rather woody flavors (I probably would not call it dirty flavors, but well...). The ...


3

This site makes a case for not muddling the mint at all; muddled mint can give "really muddy, dirty flavors," according to their expert, Leo Robitschek of The NoMad and Eleven Madison Park in Manhattan. If you're looking to avoid bits of mint in your teeth, they have two suggestions: Make a mint simple syrup by "steeping mint leaves in hot water for about 5 ...


2

For mojitos and juleps, I like to make a mint simple syrup. Basically you add a bunch of chopped mint leaves to a 1:1 sugar/water mixture, heat it until the sugar is dissolved, take it off the heat, and let it steep for an hour or two. If it's not minty enough, just put it back on the heat for a bit and repeat. For one cup of sugar/water, I threw in ~1/2 cup ...


2

I just flew yesterday and asked what it was. They make it with sprite instead of making the stuff. So lemons, mint, and I think she said bitters.


2

One option would be to make a syrup. Heating water and sugar with the mint, and straining the mint leaves out would be enough to make a simple syrup - altering the ratio of sugar to water will control thickness and shelf life, altering the mount of mint will change intensity. Such a syrup can be used as-is on ice cream, flavored syrups often are, but if ...


2

My preferred method would be to juice the mint in one of those juicers meant for wheat grass which can get a ton of moisture even from a dryish plant, then use this juice pure or dissolved in sugar. The second thing you can try is maceration. This is usually done with fruit, and means you cut it up and mix with sugar, then leave to stay for several days. ...


2

The recipe already tells you when to add the flavoring. The menthol gives it that minty kick ("cold" feeling) and is used in more than one bubblegum flavoring, like mint, peppermint, sometimes cherry. For industrial applications it is easier to buy powder and then compound it into the flavor, but for home applications I recommend that you buy a mint flavor ...


2

Idea 1: Assuming the leaves are oxidizing: you could add an antioxidant. Vitamin C is handy and will scrounge up oxygen radicals. Crush up some pills and shake them in. It will make it a little sour too - ascorbic acid is vitamin c. Idea 2: deplete your alcohol solution of dissolved oxygen first. When you heat something to near boiling, the first wave ...


1

You don’t, unless you have extensive chemical equipment and knowledge (and in that case, you probably wouldn’t be asking here). Pure menthol is produced either synthetically or from the essential oil of peppermint in a rather complex process. Details for example in the link above. As a cook and gardener, you would have to get the essential oil before even ...


1

Every recipe I’ve seen asks for mint extract, which is mint that has had the flavors removed by steam distillation. This is not very difficult to do if you purchase some glass distillation equipment from a science supply company. There would be no need to further process it to pure menthol and crystallize. There are plenty of videos on YouTube which ...


1

When processing leaves into tea, there are three important steps: Withering: this happens in the shadow or in the sun depending on what tea you want to make. In your case, I think sun-drying is proper. The goal is to allow the leaves to dry and soften a bit. Rolling: after withering, you can roll the leaves, to squeesh the flavor from the inside to the ...


1

Freezing might work. Yes alcohol won't freeze but it doesn't have to and it may be better if it doesn't. The alcohol and mint oil are a solution so the oil is suspended in the alcohol. Depending on the freezing point of the mint oil it might separate out. Or the viscosity may change enough to allow for some separation. Think of motor oil in the winter ...


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