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66

Peppermint is a hybrid breed of two plants belonging to the mint genus, spearmint and watermint. In my experience, when 'mint' is referred to by itself without any other descriptors, it usually refers to the spearmint flavour people are used to (from things like green restaurant mint candies, toothpaste, etc). Peppermint will be denoted as peppermint. ...


49

No, mint won't dissolve in water (leaves are mostly cellulose), but it does make excellent tea. Boiling water, steep 5-6 minutes. For best results, I recommending purchasing whole leaf mint intended for use as a tea. That way you can experiment and determine which kind of mint you feel makes the best tea (or make your own blend, I like spearmint tea with a ...


35

There are thermal sensation scales, and they are applied in food research too, although their primary use tends to be focused on clothing or environment. They tend to be categorical rather than ratio scales, and don't depend on the presence of a single compound the way scoville does. Despite checking several likely sources (a book on neurogastronomy, a ...


26

You probably don't need to remove the stalks from the leaves, especially for young plants. However, the older and stronger the stalk becomes, the less appetizing it will be, in my opinion. To rip the leaves off easily, especially with thicker/sturdier stalks, just start at the top of the stalk and firmly pinch it. Then, run your fingers down the stalk, ...


22

Mint leaves, and plant matter in general, won’t dissolve in water no matter how finely you grind them. They are largely made of substances which are simply not (very) soluble in water. At best you’ll achieve a “suspension”, where the particles remain suspended in the liquid for some time; but it won’t be stable, and eventually they’ll sink to the bottom or ...


17

You have several options for mint-flavored water, and none of them includes dissolving dried mint leaves in it. As others said, leaves don't dissolve in water (plants would be in a lot of trouble if they did!) You can make a mint tea. You pour hot water over the dried (or fresh) leaves, leave it for a few minutes, then strain it. Buying mint tea in bulk ...


12

It depends on your mint, and even the time of year. I grow mint in a pot in the garden, and the early growth of the year can be chopped (finely) stems and all for things like potato salad or falafel. At this point the leaves are small and you need quite a lot of them, and the stems are soft at least near the tips. Later on, you might get away with ...


12

While it is true that there are a variety of mints, I think your biggest challenge is that it is "late in the season." I find that here (Philly, USA), in August, all of my herbs tend to develop a bitterness that is not there in spring and early summer. While it may be the variety, I don't think it is the age of the plant, as my mint comes back each year as ...


10

As far as I'm aware, the traditional Greek tzatziki doesn't generally include mint at all. It's a cucumber dip that is made of yogurt and sometimes includes dill or mint as a flavoring: Tzatziki (Anglicized: /tsɑːtˈsiːki/ }; Greek: τζατζίκι [dzaˈdzici] or [dʒaˈdʒici]) is a Greek sauce served with grilled meats or as a dip. Tzatziki is made of strained ...


9

I think you might get better, less-grassy results by steeping the mint in the cream (heat the cream first) but not actually including the leaves in the ice cream. You want to get the aromatic oil to provide the mintiness, but leave out the actual greens which are making it grassy and herbal. Another option, as suggested in comments, would be to make a syrup ...


9

Separating the leaves of mint from the stem is only necessary if the stem is woody, which partly depends on the variety and age of the mint. The stems of young mint shoots on most varieties of plant are tender and full of mint flavor, so can be used in dishes. Once they get older the shoots become stiff and woody, and can't be left in dishes or pureed. You ...


9

Hold the stalk by the tip of the steam and then run your forefinger and thumb down the stalk. You can then just pinch the soft top leaves off and add them to the pile. E.g. in this youtube video Some people also will use the holes in a colander instead (the idea being you then have all the leaves in the colander ready to wash, although I never wash mint ...


7

While it is true that the mint flavor will fade with cooking, it is still there to some degree. I bet you would be able to identify the difference if you left it out. However, whenever you want to highlight a fresh herb, such a mint, it is good practice to chop some of that herb at the last possible moment before serving, and garnish your finished product. ...


7

Mint chutney is normally almost all herbs (mint and cilantro), and it's ground/blended so it's completely green: (from this mint chutney recipe) I can't really see the chutney/dip in your picture that well. You say it was mint and yogurt, and it looks like it might be pale green, so I'd guess it just had overall more yogurt than usual. But as long as it's ...


6

Well - not exactly. The reason that this technique works with lemons is that they actually do contain quite a bit of water. It's not so much "water-free" as it is using the residual water from the rinds and un-squeezed pips. Mint contains a lot less water by weight, so if you tried it in similar portions you'd wind up not with mint syrup, but with slightly-...


5

Scoville's original method for determinig the Scoville level of a pepper was to dry the pepper, extract the heat components, and continunally dilute the extract until the majority of a panel of tasters could no longer detect it. It's not a great test, but could easily be adapted to any sort of sensation. In the case of menthol, the majority of menthol in ...


5

In pure water, no plant matter will actually dissolve. You can get close by forming a suspension (this is how green tea made using matcha is made, as well as hot cocoa), but it will not actually dissolve because cellulose and lignin are very insoluble in water and account for a majority (by mass) of all plant matter. There are three other methods used ...


4

I recently asked this question to my dietitian friend at work, and she advised fruit/herbs last about 3 to 5 days in water in the fridge before becoming soft and mushy. If your mint leaf still looks nice and pretty, you are most likely OK. She also recommended a website to me: www.infusedwaters.com/faq for recipes and advise.


4

Harms? Meh, that's silliness. You can make your own fizzy water if you're so inclined. Sodamakers. If you really don't want fizzy, then just substitute still water in any of the recipes in a search for Virgin Mojitos. Choose recipes that use soda water, club soda or seltzer water, not ginger ale. Ginger ale adds flavor, you want recipes that stand without ...


4

The mints in general - spearmint and peppermint - have the cooling mouthfeel associated to ligants to CRM1 (now named TRPM8) receptors. The various nuances in flavor are given by other molecules, like limonene and carvones in spearmint; and menthol, menthone and menthyl acetate in peppermint. Wintergreens do not contain those ligants that provide a cooling ...


4

It is whatever they had on hand. There seems to be a statistically higher chance to get spearmint, but they sell other mints too. From the point of view of the supermarket, the ambiguity is not a bug, it's a feature. They just sell whatever gets delivered.


3

There are absolutely no substitutes, neither cheap nor expensive. First, the cooling effect is due to a very rare coincidence. It so happens that menthol is chemically capable of activating one of the temperature receptors in human skin (also present in the lining of the mouth). There are no other substances which do the same thing, at least not ones known ...


3

Actually the right way to make a mojito is bruising the mint. A lot of bartenders just use a couple of stalks of mint and slap it. Mint (as some other herbs) have microscopic hair, which releases the aromas as soon as they are bruised. Muddling as correctly said will release rather woody flavors (I probably would not call it dirty flavors, but well...). The ...


3

Recipe requests are off-topic but I can solve your problem nonetheless: After Eights are filled with soft fondant, which is sugar, often glucose syrup and water boiled to the soft ball stage, then whiped. If you google "poured fondant" you should find enough recipes online.


3

One option would be to make a syrup. Heating water and sugar with the mint, and straining the mint leaves out would be enough to make a simple syrup - altering the ratio of sugar to water will control thickness and shelf life, altering the mount of mint will change intensity. Such a syrup can be used as-is on ice cream, flavored syrups often are, but if ...


3

This is a fun question, but your plan is not very practical. If you indeed insist on doing it, you have three steps in the process of menthol extraction: Extract the essential oil from the leaves Separate the essential oil from the solvent you used Freeze the menthol out of the essential oil. For the essential oil extraction, the only method doable at ...


3

I'd make it into ice cubes. They'd add decorative interest too. Fridge, maybe a week, freezer, more like 6 months. There's a full list of storage times in How long can I store a food in the pantry, refrigerator, or freezer?


3

You can grind dried mint in any blender or food processor. You don't need a particularily good blender, as long as the mint is dry enough you should end up with something similar to Matcha Tea, maybe a bit more coarse. If you're not happy with the result you can use a mortar and pestle to make the powder finer, but be aware that it is a time-consuming ...


2

My preferred method would be to juice the mint in one of those juicers meant for wheat grass which can get a ton of moisture even from a dryish plant, then use this juice pure or dissolved in sugar. The second thing you can try is maceration. This is usually done with fruit, and means you cut it up and mix with sugar, then leave to stay for several days. ...


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