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34

There are thermal sensation scales, and they are applied in food research too, although their primary use tends to be focused on clothing or environment. They tend to be categorical rather than ratio scales, and don't depend on the presence of a single compound the way scoville does. Despite checking several likely sources (a book on neurogastronomy, a ...


26

You probably don't need to remove the stalks from the leaves, especially for young plants. However, the older and stronger the stalk becomes, the less appetizing it will be, in my opinion. To rip the leaves off easily, especially with thicker/sturdier stalks, just start at the top of the stalk and firmly pinch it. Then, run your fingers down the stalk, ...


12

It depends on your mint, and even the time of year. I grow mint in a pot in the garden, and the early growth of the year can be chopped (finely) stems and all for things like potato salad or falafel. At this point the leaves are small and you need quite a lot of them, and the stems are soft at least near the tips. Later on, you might get away with ...


6

While it is true that the mint flavor will fade with cooking, it is still there to some degree. I bet you would be able to identify the difference if you left it out. However, whenever you want to highlight a fresh herb, such a mint, it is good practice to chop some of that herb at the last possible moment before serving, and garnish your finished product. ...


4

Scoville's original method for determinig the Scoville level of a pepper was to dry the pepper, extract the heat components, and continunally dilute the extract until the majority of a panel of tasters could no longer detect it. It's not a great test, but could easily be adapted to any sort of sensation. In the case of menthol, the majority of menthol in ...


2

Idea 1: Assuming the leaves are oxidizing: you could add an antioxidant. Vitamin C is handy and will scrounge up oxygen radicals. Crush up some pills and shake them in. It will make it a little sour too - ascorbic acid is vitamin c. Idea 2: deplete your alcohol solution of dissolved oxygen first. When you heat something to near boiling, the first wave ...


2

The recipe already tells you when to add the flavoring. The menthol gives it that minty kick ("cold" feeling) and is used in more than one bubblegum flavoring, like mint, peppermint, sometimes cherry. For industrial applications it is easier to buy powder and then compound it into the flavor, but for home applications I recommend that you buy a mint flavor ...


1

I keep a bunch of sprigs in the water jug at my desk and discovered that if kept near sunlight they actually will continue to live and even grow to produce new mint. The existing sprigs have grown a network of roots. When a leaf gets bruised or falls off I take it out before it starts to rott, and have been drinking with the same mint for a month now. Once a ...


1

When processing leaves into tea, there are three important steps: Withering: this happens in the shadow or in the sun depending on what tea you want to make. In your case, I think sun-drying is proper. The goal is to allow the leaves to dry and soften a bit. Rolling: after withering, you can roll the leaves, to squeesh the flavor from the inside to the ...


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