28

Tilt the lid. It will stay where you put it… approximately. See pan top left & pyrex bottom right; they will stay like that all day if needed If it really refuses to stay, then wedge a spatula [or any other bit of wood or plastic (& of course, not metal if it's going in the microwave) of any appropriate size]* in it, either from the edge, down the ...


16

Funny enough, I saw a little silicone gadget the other day when I was out shopping - those stick men called Lid Sid are designed to do exactly what you want. Granted, they are real unitaskers, but also kind of fun. Other manufacturers make similar items in other shapes - I have seen sheep, witches and others.


12

You've partially answered your own question: When wrapped in foil, the water contained naturally in the ingredients will re-moisturise the banana bread. a. To reduce: don't wrap it leave it in the oven to cool down with the oven slightly open so that most of the moisture can escape b. to enhance: make a dome of tin foil above it before putting it in the ...


10

Brown sugar is just white granulated sugar with molasses added. Dark brown sugar just has more molasses than light brown sugar. Coffee shops often have turbinado sugar, a common brand is Sugar in the Raw. Turbinado sugar is brown because it is less refined than white sugar. The turbinado sugar is less "wet" than brown sugar, so it will dissolve somewhat ...


8

A different option is to use a silicon lid. You don't have to leave it open, you just cover the pot fully and it bleeds off steam on its own just like a tilted solid lid.


7

That 1/4th cup margarine and the 2 eggs are not enough to give those brownies the moisture they need. I suspect you want something low in sugar and fat. Evelyn Tribole, MS, RD created two books that talk about substitutions for fat and sugar in recipes. One technique to replace fat (like butter) in a recipe is to use baby food prunes or applesauce. ...


6

Desiccants eventually saturate with moisture, making them ineffective. This can be reversed, usually by heating the packs - various "recipes" for reheating are quoted, depending on the kind of desiccant pack; for those filled with silica gel temperatures of around 130-140 degrees celsius in a well ventilated (eg slightly opened) oven (moist atmosphere does ...


6

Short answer: It Depends. Long Answer: You are correct that the decision on precooking mushrooms before putting them on pizza is about controlling moisture. For some hefty mushrooms like portabellos, it's also about making sure that they cook fully. Here's what to factor in: What's the density of mushrooms per pizza area? That is, how much space ...


5

There are two common categories of Japanese korokke, one made with potato or another starchy vegetable (kabocha, a Japanese squash, is also common), and the other made with a roux, typically with corn and/or crab, called a cream korokke. In a vegetable-based one, which may have additions like ground beef, sesame seeds, certain pickled vegetables, or other ...


5

I used to disbelieve the idea, as it has all the qualities of a nice myth. Turns out that I was wrong. And also, that the story behind it is more complicated than the myth makes us believe. A nice example can be found on scientific papers published in the area of commercial food technology, like this one. An important quote from the abstract: ...


4

Imagine cooking one steak at 140F for 1 hour and another for 5 hours. Will the 5 hour steak be drier and weigh less? Briefly: Yes, it will be drier, and yes, it will weigh less. And no, 140F isn't the tipping point, though higher temperatures definitely will dry things out faster. Moisture loss will increase with increased sous vide time even at 131F (the ...


4

Fat comes out due to melting The primary way that fat will leave a grilled meat is through melting. Animal fat isn't a pure or refined substance, so it doesn't have a set and exact melting point, the way that water does. In my experience, fat melting occurs in the 55 - 70 C range (130 - 160 F). You will see little fat gone at an internal temp of 55 C, but ...


3

First, I agree with Tarak'ha's suggestions because it looks like you're trying to keep things somewhat healthy. Since it looks like you're trying to make healthier brownies, I just wanted to mention yet another less heard of healthy fat replacement in baking: Finely shredded / pureed beetroot. I learned this trick from a show called "Cook Yourself Thin" for ...


3

One technique for removing water from a vegetable, which works very well for onions, is to salt them liberally. Then give them some time to sit, preferably in a shallow layer. The salt will extract water from the vegetable, due to the osmotic gradient between the salt outside and the vegetable inside. Some of the salt will go into the vegetable, but much ...


3

Wet a dishtowel.Make sure that it is really wet almost dripping. Microwave it for 2min. Be carefull it is really hot and steaming. cover top of bowl( Do not touch brown sugar)Microwave another 30 sec. Let set for 1 to 2 min. take out. Break up with for and hands.


3

Increasing the amount of yogurt and/or banana mash should work best, the former having a more noticeable difference. You might have to experiment to get the amount right, but I'd suggest starting with an additional 1/4 cup of yogurt or banana mash. You could try more date puree as well but that might make the muffins too thick.


3

Many factors influence how juicy prepared meat ends up being. Just on the ingredient side, the type of animal, when and how it is butchered, how fatty the meat is, and any other pre-processing that might take place (e.g. dried, smoked, salted) prior to it landing on a store shelf may vary considerably, and affect juicyness as well as every other parameter ...


3

You want to use oil as just any fat. More to the point, you want something that is liquid at refrigerator temperature. Butter becomes solid at that temperature and makes for a terrible texture. Beyond that, err on the side of using an overly flavorful broth, as flavor is far more subdued at colder temperatures. Beyond that, to ensure tenderness cook it ...


3

A Practical Guide to Sous Vide Cooking, Effects of Heat on Meat describes what causes moisture loss: The water-holding capacity of whole muscle meat is governed by the shrinking and swelling of myofibrils. Around 80% of the water in muscle meat is held within the myofibrils between the thick (myosin) and thin (actin) filaments. Between 105°F and 140°F (40°C ...


3

I have a rice cooker where the lid's vent hole is slightly too small, so I've done this by propping the lid open with a chopstick on one end of the lid. If you want it to be evenly vented, you could put one chopstick on both sides of the lid.


2

Your cake did not rise properly because of the substitution you made. Oil and apple mousse are only an acceptable substitution for butter under some circumstances. When a recipe directs you to cream the butter with the sugar, you cannot use a non-solid fat substitute. The creaming creates a bubbly, airy structure, and these mini-bubbles get expanded by the ...


2

Make your rice a big batch at a time, let it cool until handleable, then pack individual servings in snack sized zipper-top bags. Throw them in the freezer. Rice freezes beautifully, I take the frozen packs and throw them straight into the microwave (it would work just the same way in a steamer basket, even simmering water, just don't open the bag), the hot ...


2

From personal experience, rice doesn't refrigerate well; I tend to buy quick-cook rice that I can just microwave so it's fresh when I need it, but I hear that it freezes better, with less moisture loss. Perhaps the vegetables can be frozen as well? If you spread them out on a baking sheet when you freeze them, they should be easily portionable later, but I ...


2

I know its not quick, but I store a slice of bread with my brown sugar. Softens up hard sugar and never let's it get hard if a new bag.


2

It is not inherently either, but most often it performs similarly to moist heat. Microwaves work by directly exciting polar molecules within the food, usually water or fats. If the food contains significant quantities of water (like most fruits, vegetables, meats and so on) then microwaving usually acts very much akin to steaming, which is a moist heat ...


2

Talking about the role of each single ingredient and how they interact is way too much for an answer here, and parts of it have been discussed in other questions anyway. So I will give a quick info on the recipe you linked: It has way too much flour. For a standard pound cake, you want equal weights of flour, sugar, fat and egg, and most muffins follow a ...


2

You can't regain the original texture in the rice paper once it's changed. Spring rolls need to be eaten pretty much the same day they are made.


2

You need to start (and maybe stay) from low temperature. This way the moisture will leave the cookie. If you start with high temperature you making a firm skin that won't let the moisture leave.


2

Unless you are salting (or sugaring) your cabbage first then draining and patting dry, baking will release more liquid than the egg whites can bind. Recipe could use something absorbent


2

Or you could try saute em before hand then just drop em on few minutes before your pizza is done?


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