16

You could, of course, create gel layers, and the determining factor in stability would be the firmness of those gels. However - and I suppose this is just a hunch - I seriously doubt that a gel firm enough to hold the weight of all the heavier layers above it (and you are asking for at least 3) would really be drinkable, unless you're aiming for the ...


14

You can get better cooling with less dry ice by using a cooling bath. Chunks of dry ice mixed with isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol, isopropanol) will give you a liquid with a temperature of -77°C (-106.6 °F). The liquid will transfer heat to the botton of a metal dish far more efficiently than solid or granulated dry ice.


13

The Hong Kong Centre for Food Safety offers the following information and advice: Use of Hydrogen Peroxide in Food Processing Because of its strong oxidising property, hydrogen peroxide is used as a bleaching agent in some foods such as wheat flour, edible oil, egg white etc. in countries like the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. It ...


10

I have used dry ice trying to recreate Heston Blumenthal's Dry Ice Ice cream, where you leave the ice cream mixture in a stand mixer that's still mixing, and bit by bit pour powdered dry ice into the mixer, which should sublime evenly and neatly, leaving you with ice cream in five minutes. I also used leftover dry ice to do what I imagined to be something ...


8

As a matter of fact, here is a link to a PDF of a technical article that talks all about using microbial transglutaminase on vegetable proteins. This article is not for the scientifically faint-of-heart, and it does not contain recipes, but it does review ways industry has found to use transglutaminase in making vegetable-based food products, using things ...


8

I would suggest finding a heat-resistant balloon of some sort, or a relatively spherical plastic bag, or even a round bag made from linen muslin. You steam the yolks in a small balloon, then cut it away once they're set. Then you immerse this yolk in the whites, in a bigger balloon, and once again steam/boil this until set, and cut away the outer balloon. ...


7

First of all, the term "molecular gastronomy" is almost universally derided by those who practice it and "Modernist cuisine" seems to have become the accepted nomenclature. The book Modernist Cuisine has what I regard as an excellent introduction to the movement and drawing the analogy with other Modernist movements in other artforms. The Modernist movement ...


7

Lemons are quite sour, while Meyer lemons are much sweeter and less acidic. If you substitute directly, it'll have a dramatic effect. For example, suppose you start out with a dessert made with lemons that has enough sugar added (or little enough lemon juice) to make it the right sweet/sour balance for you. If you replace the lemon with Meyer lemon, it'll ...


7

Yes, I wrote a post about this a few years ago - the first to describe the method in a home pressure cooker. The theory goes that the pressure difference inside and outside the egg PLUS the shock of the cold facilitates the detachment of membrane from the shell. The Kitchn tried and confirmed my method and many of my readers will no longer hard boil an egg ...


6

You can thank gingerol for the kick in fresh ginger, and shogaol and zingerone for the heat of dried ginger. Gingerol is chemically similar to capsaicin in chilis and piperine in black pepper, but undergoes changes when heated or dried converting it to the other compounds. You can see where gingerol and shogaol fall on the Scoville scale here.


6

Just a few additional possibly-obvious practical considerations for #2 and #3 that I didn't see in previous discussion, with the caveat that I've not actually tried to anti-griddle before: Dry ice is carbon dioxide after all, so be sure to have sufficient ventilation; Wikipedia tells me breathing too much results in "hypercapnia"; Make the best use of the ...


6

When I've used Meyer lemons I haven't noticed Mandarin orange flavors. Meyer lemons are much sweeter and less sour than normal lemons. I use them in recipes that strongly feature lemon fruit, not just juice. For example, shaker lemon pies are made with thin slices of whole lemons, including the peel. Regular lemons are overwhelming so I use Meyers. On the ...


6

I used to use a cream and condensed milk recipe to make LN ice cream. It sounds like you're not using enough LN - while you should end up with something scoopable it takes quite a bit of beating to get there. We tended to work as a team, with one (often me) beating as someone else slowly poured in the LN. This minimised solid lumps (which then needed to be ...


5

I would try the cold oil spherefication method. Using agar agar as your gelling agent. The cold oil spherefication involves a solution which is in this case coffee that contains 1% to 2% agar (depending on desired consistency). The solution, which is warm is then inserted into a cold oil bath. Which will set the agar. Why agar? Because agar melt at 85C. ...


5

Gingerol, named for the ginger in which it is found, are the main hot and spicy compound in ginger. It is similar in structure to capscaicin or piperine, but is transformed in cooking into the milder zingerone.


5

Does the term deconstructed food really mean separated constituents or does it mean improved or simplified by inspecting the constituents and recombining them differently? Yes. (As in either can be correct) It's about taking the various components of a dish and perhaps just separating them, or it may mean putting them back together in an unusual or novel ...


4

I would say that hallmark techniques of molecular gastronomy include sous-vide, foams, spherification and various uses of things like carbon dioxide, liquid nitrogen and natural gums and enzymes typically used in mass-market consumables. The goal of Molecular Gastronomy is to not only truly explore and understand the science of cooking, but to leverage that ...


4

HOLD ON! NOOOO! Not over the counter HP. It's the additive/stabilizers in the HP that can ALSO harm you. NOT MEANT FOR CONSUMPTION. Like the other answer says, There is food grade HP you can obtain through the proper channels that can be used, but again needs to be washed off. Once in a while I would say, mouth rinsing... and so on. Most importantly ...


4

The simple answer is YES! There are a number of chefs currently experimenting with the implementation of robots in their kitchens. There are various technologies and the research is on several fronts, including what I think is most interesting which is controlling nutritional values for specialized diets. Food printing is where I am seeing most chefs ...


4

I believe the most common term, especially for foods that just visually look like another food, is Trompe-l'œil. While the Wikipedia article linked focuses on other forms of art, the word is still applied to foods. If you google "Trompe l'œil food", you will find many examples of the term in use. Note that Google seems smart enough to handle either "œ" or ...


4

Many manufacturers and manuals say that you shouldn't grease them. However, for parts of the process you may be able to use Taylor ice cream machine lubrication or Vaseline (see below). Dave Arnold who also runs the Cooking Issues blog, is the king of RotoVap in the kitchen. There is a full article over here on Dispensery Grade where he discusses RotoVap ...


4

Deconstruction is often seen being done by chefs, where lavish attention has been paid on each element, so when deconstructed food is seen it is often "improved" as you say. That doesn't mean it has to be though, deconstructed simply means that ingredients are cooked separately and then assembled when they would usually be cooked as a whole. You could make ...


4

Coat them in bee's wax or cocoa butter. You can actually buy them from MSK with the coating on. You likely won't be able to make them yourself without a huge amount of equipment. As far as I'm aware, they require carbon-dioxide to be pumped in, as the sugar mixture cools. This is what makes them crackle, as the gas is released when the small pockets of air ...


4

Potassium hydroxide is not something you'd want to eat. It's caustic (the base form of corrosive), and you ABSOLUTELY should not mix an anhydrous (pellet or powdered) form of it directly into food, whether or not you mix it with another powder first. Also, if you get the proportions off and the acid and base do not fully react, you could end up with a ...


4

They are harder to juice than regular lemons, at least with reamers or unaided, because the skin breaks apart much more easily (like a plump mandarin orange).


4

Matzah meal has already been cooked and so therefore is no longer flour and cannot possibly "rise" or become leavened. That is why any passover cakes you will make need to have egg whites separated - that is what created the leavened texture. Think of matzah meal like bread crumbs, whatever you could use breadcrumbs for, you can use matzah meal for and ...


4

The reason your scoopable LN2 cooled ice cream melts fast is mostly because un-aerated ice cream needs to be warmer to be scoopable. It is basically at or close to the melting temperature when you are scooping it. Normally produced Ice cream is usually highly aerated making it softer than expected and easily scoopable at a lower temperature. The aeration ...


4

As long as you know the lecithin content (in the liquid) you can substitute sunflower lecithin with soy lecithin. It’s more or less similar molecules. I use them interchangeably. (Even make mine at home from sunflower seeds ;))


3

If you are talking about the Bolthouse Farms Vanilla Chai Tea, the problem you are running into is that its actually a blend of a plain chai tea and a lightly vanilla flavored soy protein blend. I have tried a few times myself to duplicate it and i came up with this... I would make a good hot chai and mix it with vanilla soy protein powder and whisk it ...


3

Plants are green due to the presence of chlorophyll. When chlorophyll is exposed to acids, alkalis, heat or enzymes, it first loses its long hydrocarbon tail, becoming water-soluble instead of fat-soluble. Then, hydrogen ions replace the magnesium atom in the center of the chlorophyll molecule, turning it to pheophythin, which has a dull green-yellow-grey ...


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