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11

I'm sorry to say that your three packages are no longer safe for consumption. Expiry dates are usually pretty conservative and food may still be good several days past them, but the concerning factor in your case is the ballooning of your packaging. As various bacteria live their lives, they produce gas. A small amount of bacteria over a short amount a time ...


5

In the referenced mousse recipes (there is more than one in that dessert), the vast majority of the foaminess will come from the whipped cream. You need to ensure that your cream is beaten properly to maximize foaminess, that is air volume: Chill your working equipment, including the bowl, whisk, and of course the cream itself If whipping by hand, use a ...


5

There are several major types of mousse, made from different bases, and with different flavor elements. Depending on which one you are using, they may have varying requirements. As MandoMando mentions in the comments, assuming you are using a mousse based on whipped cream or whipped egg whites or a freezer-stable thickener (neither gelatin, agar agar, nor ...


5

There are two things you can do to make the mousse stiffer: Reduce the water from the fruit. So use some kind of concentrate instead of the pure fruit. For example, you could cook down a syrup or jam and add it to the mousse. Or see if dehydrating juice gets you somewhere. Use more fat. Instead of whipping cream at 30 to 35% fat, you could use double-...


4

Brownies are thicker than a standard cake sponge, but either can absorb moisture, if you want to prevent that then a thin layer of chocolate frosting would work fine, or as you suggest a thin layer of chocolate. It is opinion based whether I think a brownie or a sponge would be better with mousse, what I will say is that the consideration is the difference ...


3

One alternative is to use pasteurized eggs.


3

However much you are making, use this ratio: 4 parts heavy cream/whipping cream to 2 parts sweetened condensed milk to 2 parts passionfruit pulp. Make sure that before you start, you whip the heavy cream until it holds in stiff peaks. This results in a mousse that has an almost custard-like consistency, but with a lighter feel. I don't know how to make a ...


3

There are several recipies on the internet for this though most have the lemon curd on top of the cheesecake. Mary Berry has a version where she includes the curd directly into the marscapone mixture, so it doesn't seem likely it will curdle. Putting it onto the biscuit, then adding the cheesecake mixture might cause other problems, either the curd could ...


3

The goal is to melt the outermost little bit and let the ring mold slide off. Make sure they have had plenty of time to set up before unmolding. The torch will work, although I would use a towel soaked in very very hot water, then squeezed dryish—just wrap it around the mold for ten or twenty seconds. This maybe gentler than the torch, and less ...


3

I've never tried the iSi gourmet whip+. It sounds very novel and like a bit of a gimmicky way to cook which is never a bad thing, especially if you can make your friends say, "wow!" But the real trick to making mousse is beating air into the egg whites. So you gotta be confident the gourmet whip works, otherwise don't stick with it. I would just use a ...


2

About two years ago I read about the "ultimate chocolate mousse" from Heston Blumenthal. Interestingly, the recipe only calls for two ingredients: bittersweet chocolate and water. Sugar can be added, but it is optional. It is all in the technique. You use an approach that is similar to tempering chocolate and then whip. Place a mixing bowl over a bowl ...


2

If you are able to get hold of it, I have used vegetarian gelatin substitute in the past, and found it to be fine. I'm in the UK, and most supermarkets stock something like Dr. Oetker Vege-Gel or their own brand (often called vetetarian gel, rather than gelatin(e), to avoid confusion). If you are looking for an agar conversion, Joy of Baking suggests that a ...


2

Gelatine has nothing to do with a mousse. That means it's no problem to find a recipe without ;) . I'm doing Mousse au Chocolat like that: melt 200-250gr (more is better for stability) of chocolate (70%+ cacao) in a baine-marie whip 400gr of cream whip one egg yolk in a baine-marie until fluffy * mix the chocolate into the egg yolk carefully fold the cream ...


2

It could just be that it wasn't mixed thoroughly - little droplets of dissolved gelatin intermingled with the cool whip would certainly give you a grainy texture. Whisking thoroughly, or even using a hand mixer, could avoid some of this. But failing that, it's possible that it's simply prone to separation. Cool whip is a sort of fake cream, emulsified fats ...


2

One of the most important details in this recipe is that the mixture needs plenty of time - overnight is ideal, but at least 2 to 3 hours - to really chill completely before serving, so that the fruit acid in the passion fruit pulp (or concentrate) has time to thicken the protein in the heavy cream and condensed milk. (It works sort of like the way the lime ...


2

You might take a strategy from a orange olive oil cake that I make. Cut about 1/2 inch off the ends of oranges. Then quarter the oranges. Place them in a pot of water, then bring to the boil. Drain and repeat 3 to 4 times. This reduces the bitterness of the pith. Now, add 4 cups of water and 1 cup of sugar to the pot. Add the oranges and bring to a ...


2

There is no strict delineation between these two terms. Either can be savory or sweet. Some common differences are: Mousses may get their foaminess from from plain whipped egg whites, a meringue, whole eggs, whipped cream, or something else; a souffle is always leavened by whipped egg whites. Mousses (except for some seafood mousses, which are gently ...


2

I always make my chocolate mousse with eggs, but two possible causes are that your ratios could be off or your chocolate mixture is hot and the whipped cream is cold, causing the mixture to seize-up and deflate. If you decide to make a more traditional mousse, the ratio is very simple: 1 oz baking chocolate per egg. Here is a basic recipe: Yields 4 ...


2

I'm not sure it's possible to overbeat the meringue (not without falling asleep while doing it), so I don't think that could would be the main cause of a failed mousse. On the other hand, it's definitely possible to overbeat the cream for the purpose of being an aerator, and it's a very common issue. For mousses you don't want cream to get to stiff peaks: ...


2

If you make the mousse properly, there should be no moisture leaking out of it into or onto the brownie underneath. The thin melted chocolate layer will help keep the layers seperate.


2

Guittard replied to my query after the fact, so I learned firsthand that one should use less liquid because cocoa solids in dark chocolate are absent from white chocolate. I substituted 1/4 cup milk for the same amount of strong coffee in the original recipe, and the Baker's Premium White Chocolate liquefied. Melted semisweet doesn't pour like it did, and ...


1

I trained in pastry in Canada and France, and very rarely saw/made a product that had raw eggs, in any form. Sugar acts to blanche eggs, but usually if you are to blanche yolks with sugar, they're whipped over a bain marie until they reach ~65C. You definitely pasteurize them. Even French meringue is only used if it is going to be baked, the preference is ...


1

Ballooned package = trashcan. 'nough said.


1

No, you cannot turn this mixture into a mousse. You have to eat it as it is - which is probably simply a tasty creamy pudding without the expected mousselike consistency. Even if it is grainy, there is no reason not to eat it that way. Unless you find it utterly impalatable, in which case you have to throw it away. It is normal to expect some failures with ...


1

White chocolate makes me think of neither chocolate nor vanilla--- it definately has its own flavor. I don't recall what edition of Mastering the Art of French Cooking I copied the recipe from. It includes the same ingredients posted here, though I typed 1 cup semisweet chocolate chips or 6 squares semisweet baking chocolate, and 1/4 cup orange juice, ...


1

Cheryl, to me (as I can't speak for others), white chocolate doesn't taste at all 'chocolaty' but just has the mellow rich flavour of the bean's fat and the cream used in making it. Even if someone added a very small amount of expresso or coffee liquor to it, it would only taste like coffee, although fairly faint. Not at all like mocha. White rum has ...


1

A very easy variant is simply melted chocolate chips and tofu, which can be adjusted in firmness by using silken to extra firm, drained -blended/processed/whipped and left to set. Amount of each can be varied to suit as well. Done right, you'd never guess there was tofu in there (so better warn the soy-allergic folks not to touch it.) The firmer types ...


1

In my opinion A soufflé is something that requires heat and will "rise" when cooked A mousse does not "rise" and is general served uncooked


1

The grainy texture you tasted could be one of two things: The Gelatin pack wasn't stirred thoroughly enough. The Gelatin pack was old and didn't have all of it's dissolving properties. Either way it's easy to fix.


1

If you are insistent upon substituting something for the cream, you are probably going to need to experiment with adding some soy lecithin (to make sure that the substitute fats don't separate), maybe some cold-soluble gelatin too for added stabilization (regular gelatin that has been bloomed and added when the mixture is hot might also work), and possibly a ...


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