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22

Chocolate is a solid at room temperature, strawberry puree is not, so I strongly doubt that the strawberry would result in a foam. The reason chocolate would form a solid foam is that it is largely composed of a two substances - sugar and fat. Together with the air these can form a solid of fats (similar to whipped cream) with microscopic sugar crystals ...


16

The beating of a liquid to a foam is not unique to a chocolate-and-water mixture. Neither is it something that works with any random liquid. What you need is an emulsion or a colloid which contains something that can hold the bubbles of the foam, and has the right proportion of that "something" to the liquid part has the right particle/droplet ...


11

I'm sorry to say that your three packages are no longer safe for consumption. Expiry dates are usually pretty conservative and food may still be good several days past them, but the concerning factor in your case is the ballooning of your packaging. As various bacteria live their lives, they produce gas. A small amount of bacteria over a short amount a time ...


5

There are two things you can do to make the mousse stiffer: Reduce the water from the fruit. So use some kind of concentrate instead of the pure fruit. For example, you could cook down a syrup or jam and add it to the mousse. Or see if dehydrating juice gets you somewhere. Use more fat. Instead of whipping cream at 30 to 35% fat, you could use double-...


4

Brownies are thicker than a standard cake sponge, but either can absorb moisture, if you want to prevent that then a thin layer of chocolate frosting would work fine, or as you suggest a thin layer of chocolate. It is opinion based whether I think a brownie or a sponge would be better with mousse, what I will say is that the consideration is the difference ...


4

There are several recipies on the internet for this though most have the lemon curd on top of the cheesecake. Mary Berry has a version where she includes the curd directly into the marscapone mixture, so it doesn't seem likely it will curdle. Putting it onto the biscuit, then adding the cheesecake mixture might cause other problems, either the curd could ...


3

One alternative is to use pasteurized eggs.


3

However much you are making, use this ratio: 4 parts heavy cream/whipping cream to 2 parts sweetened condensed milk to 2 parts passionfruit pulp. Make sure that before you start, you whip the heavy cream until it holds in stiff peaks. This results in a mousse that has an almost custard-like consistency, but with a lighter feel. I don't know how to make a ...


3

We have been making mousse with aquafaba (the liquid drained off a can of chickpeas). It's whisked by the food processor into a thick foam and then the chocolate is folded in. Quite popular approach in vegan circles.


3

I've never tried the iSi gourmet whip+. It sounds very novel and like a bit of a gimmicky way to cook which is never a bad thing, especially if you can make your friends say, "wow!" But the real trick to making mousse is beating air into the egg whites. So you gotta be confident the gourmet whip works, otherwise don't stick with it. I would just use a ...


2

About two years ago I read about the "ultimate chocolate mousse" from Heston Blumenthal. Interestingly, the recipe only calls for two ingredients: bittersweet chocolate and water. Sugar can be added, but it is optional. It is all in the technique. You use an approach that is similar to tempering chocolate and then whip. Place a mixing bowl over a bowl ...


2

If you are able to get hold of it, I have used vegetarian gelatin substitute in the past, and found it to be fine. I'm in the UK, and most supermarkets stock something like Dr. Oetker Vege-Gel or their own brand (often called vetetarian gel, rather than gelatin(e), to avoid confusion). If you are looking for an agar conversion, Joy of Baking suggests that a ...


2

Gelatine has nothing to do with a mousse. That means it's no problem to find a recipe without ;) . I'm doing Mousse au Chocolat like that: melt 200-250gr (more is better for stability) of chocolate (70%+ cacao) in a baine-marie whip 400gr of cream whip one egg yolk in a baine-marie until fluffy * mix the chocolate into the egg yolk carefully fold the cream ...


2

You might take a strategy from a orange olive oil cake that I make. Cut about 1/2 inch off the ends of oranges. Then quarter the oranges. Place them in a pot of water, then bring to the boil. Drain and repeat 3 to 4 times. This reduces the bitterness of the pith. Now, add 4 cups of water and 1 cup of sugar to the pot. Add the oranges and bring to a ...


2

There is no strict delineation between these two terms. Either can be savory or sweet. Some common differences are: Mousses may get their foaminess from from plain whipped egg whites, a meringue, whole eggs, whipped cream, or something else; a souffle is always leavened by whipped egg whites. Mousses (except for some seafood mousses, which are gently ...


2

One of the most important details in this recipe is that the mixture needs plenty of time - overnight is ideal, but at least 2 to 3 hours - to really chill completely before serving, so that the fruit acid in the passion fruit pulp (or concentrate) has time to thicken the protein in the heavy cream and condensed milk. (It works sort of like the way the lime ...


2

Guittard replied to my query after the fact, so I learned firsthand that one should use less liquid because cocoa solids in dark chocolate are absent from white chocolate. I substituted 1/4 cup milk for the same amount of strong coffee in the original recipe, and the Baker's Premium White Chocolate liquefied. Melted semisweet doesn't pour like it did, and ...


2

I always make my chocolate mousse with eggs, but two possible causes are that your ratios could be off or your chocolate mixture is hot and the whipped cream is cold, causing the mixture to seize-up and deflate. If you decide to make a more traditional mousse, the ratio is very simple: 1 oz baking chocolate per egg. Here is a basic recipe: Yields 4 ...


2

I'm not sure it's possible to overbeat the meringue (not without falling asleep while doing it), so I don't think that could would be the main cause of a failed mousse. On the other hand, it's definitely possible to overbeat the cream for the purpose of being an aerator, and it's a very common issue. For mousses you don't want cream to get to stiff peaks: ...


2

If you make the mousse properly, there should be no moisture leaking out of it into or onto the brownie underneath. The thin melted chocolate layer will help keep the layers seperate.


2

This is an expected outcome. Foams made with a siphon are not especially stable over time. If you are making a siphon recipe without stabilizers, you should prepare it in time for serving, not plan to store it.


2

Looking at the way it is cut, teared and smeared by the spoon in the video my best guess would be that it is some kind of custard or pudding that gets its consistency most probably from yolk and/or starch. Please be aware that a definitive identification only from a picture will remain an impossible task as no one will be able to see if this mass contains ...


2

Caramel wouldn't be solid enough to become such a thick layer in a cake. If you try to make it thick, you will get it to the consistency of chewy caramel candy - both too sticky and too sweet to use as part of a cake. My best guess is that you are looking at a layer of gianduja, thinned with something else - or maybe even pure Nutella. The second guess is ...


2

... If I had to guess? Jello chocolate pudding made with less milk for the dark layer, and then a whippy chocolate buttercream or mousse for the lighter layer. It could really be anything, but I felt the need to answer because I 1000% think that is Jello instant pudding. My only evidence is a profound feeling of nostalgia.


1

In the UK, anything longer than 3 days from production is generally deemed risky and unsaleable for commercial purposes. For home use, if you're fridge is at the warm end of the scale /5°c 3-5 days sounds about right to me. If it's a cold fridge /2or3°c you can add a day or two onto that range. This is a slightly higher risk approach than in a commercial ...


1

Anything that you can put through a fine mesh strainer will likely not be too much of a problem in a whipper. In fact, the ISI website has a recipe for pumpkin mousse. You should find lots of advice on the web, as this technique was quite popular for a few years.


1

So there are a few things you could change here. Firstly I would use 85g of dark chocolate for every 2 egg whites. When melting your chocolate, 2 tablespoons of hot water will help smooth it out stopping that graininess and make it less stiff/easier for the egg white stage. Leave to cool and whip up your egg whites. Then fold in a third of the egg whites,...


1

I trained in pastry in Canada and France, and very rarely saw/made a product that had raw eggs, in any form. Sugar acts to blanche eggs, but usually if you are to blanche yolks with sugar, they're whipped over a bain marie until they reach ~65C. You definitely pasteurize them. Even French meringue is only used if it is going to be baked, the preference is ...


1

Ballooned package = trashcan. 'nough said.


1

No, you cannot turn this mixture into a mousse. You have to eat it as it is - which is probably simply a tasty creamy pudding without the expected mousselike consistency. Even if it is grainy, there is no reason not to eat it that way. Unless you find it utterly impalatable, in which case you have to throw it away. It is normal to expect some failures with ...


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