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79

There is considerable overlap between cupcakes and muffins. Method From a technical point of view, muffins are made by the muffin method, making them small quickbreads. In the muffin method, the wet ingredients are combined in one bowl; and the dry ingredients are combined in another bowl. Then the two are quickly incorporated together with minimal ...


15

If you cut it with a knife, you'll tend to get a very smooth surface. If you tear it open, whether by hand or with the aid of a fork, it'll tend to break on more natural places in the crumb, giving a bit rougher surface. When toasted, that tends to result in more contrast of texture - the bits sticking up will brown more and get crunchier.


11

As Adele suggested in the comments, this is a common instruction to guard against overmixing. You mix everything in, and mix it until it's just barely combined. You just want to make sure there aren't any big pockets of dry ingredients; once all the wet and dry is combined, you're done. If you're curious why you don't want to overmix, see a previous ...


11

They are easier to mash (so that they incorporate more smoothly into the batter), sweeter (more starch has converted to sugar), and more aromatic when overripe. Still, you can get quite a good muffin or banana bread from fully ripe, but not overripe, bananas.


9

At the risk of heresy, I say when over-ripe is called for it is by the mistaken impression that the flavor is improved when it is only that it is sweeter, less starchy. Muffins will brown faster. I believe this myth grew out of the fact that recipes were created to use up what would otherwise go to waste: it then was inferred that over-ripe is ideal. My ...


9

The story is more complicated than SAJ tells it. Blueberries, like many other purple foods, are colored by a pigment called anthocyanin. It changes its color from red at very low pH to real blue at very high pH. At the blueberry's natural pH, the color is a purple with more red than blue in it. What you can do is to juice some blueberries separately, then ...


9

What Jefromi wrote. Illustrated: Knife Sliced Fork Split For a muffin with spreads like butter and/or a jelly: the texture of the fork split muffin has nooks and crannys that many people prefer. They provide an uneven spread delivery that can be enjoyable. The higher more toasted peaks also offer texture variance. For sandwiches (think Egg McMuffin): The ...


7

And cupcakes always have frosting. For me, that's actually the real defining feature: frosting. A drizzle of glaze is one thing, but once you put frosting on a muffin, it's no longer a muffin in our mind. Hey, you have to draw the line somewhere!


7

What makes pacman muffins different from any other muffins is only their decoration, not their content. So of course there are no special recipes for them. You should pick any recipe for iced muffins, or even pick two separate recipes, one for plain muffins and one for icing. Buttercream would be a good choice, as well as other soft types of icing. Then ...


7

What makes muffins soft is starch and fat. You have no fat at all in these "muffins", and very little flour when compared to the vegetables and proteins. Normal muffin proportions are 2:2:1:1 flour:liquid:egg:fat (per Ruhlmann). I guess you can add up to 2 parts filler (so as much vegetable as flour) before you get the result too terrible. In your mixture, ...


7

Honey versus sugar has nothing to do with your berries bursting or not. Assuming you are in the northern hemisphere you are getting out of season fruit as it is winter. Your blueberries are either greenhouse grown or have travelled halfway around the world from somewhere warm enough to grown them. Out of season blueberries tend to have less flavor and have ...


6

Blueberries are mostly water (~74%) and your recipe calls for a pint of them. Blueberries are roughly spherical, so they will pack into a container with a density of around 64%. The recipe comes from a site in the US, so a pint is, presumably, ~473ml. One thing I don't know is how much liquid blueberries transfer to the batter while they are cooking. If ...


6

First, you must assume a spherical muffin. This is a silly but fun question, so lets think about the limiting factors. What if you could scale down everything (the pan, the size of the ingredients, the size of the gas cells, everything else) uniformly. If that could be done, muffin tops would be a uniform phenomenon at any size. So, what can we not scale ...


6

It is absolutely safe to do so... For most foods, I would say that there is no reason not to. If they are savory muffins like corn muffins to be served with the roast, I would not hesitate at all. For sweet goods, with a high amount of butter or oil, there is some small risk of absorbing aromas. I would generally segregating strongly aromatic foods for ...


6

Your recipe has no gluten in it. Baked goods without gluten tend to have a crumbly texture; muffin batter usually contains at least some wheat flour, which contributes gluten toward the muffin's structure. The Kitchn has a good blog post about using vital wheat gluten, which can be added to a recipe that is in need of a more bread-like structure (assuming no ...


5

I took some time to compare cupcakes and muffins with each other and I listed all the differences in a convenient chart on my blog: https://backdirndl4you.wordpress.com/2015/01/19/muffin-vs-cupcake/ Have a baketastic baking day,


5

Most people want that distinct banana flavour. Which you get with over-ripe bananas. If you use bananas that are still suitable for eating, it won't be banana-y enough.


5

Due to thekitchn website the difference between muffins and cupcakes is the following: A muffin is something that's relatively healthy. It's not too sweet, perhaps made with whole wheat flour, and is more likely to be loaded with fruit than candy (ex: Blueberries). A muffin can also be savory instead of sweet. The texture is usually dryer and slightly ...


5

In the given recipe, assuming generously that the bananas came out to 1 3/4 c, the total water is: Approximately 12 oz from banana Approximately 3 oz from eggs With three cups of flour, assuming a 4.5 oz cup of flour, this is a ratio of 0.9 : 1 flour to water by weight. Compare to a similar banana muffin recipe (this one from the Food Network): 2 1/2 ...


5

You don't, it will not work. You want to substitute liquid milk for dried milk. What you don't realise is that the dried milk in such a recipe is acting as a bulking agent, ie. the dried milk is already substituting for some flour. If you don't have dried milk, you should look for another recipe that doesn't use it, if you want to be certain of reliable ...


5

After a discussion in chat with @FuzzyChef I decided that I was trying too hard to keep the dough dry. I wasn't using all of the milk (just a bit left over) and struggled a bit to get all the flour incorporated into the dough. Using all the milk made the dough more sticky, so it required more careful handling, but the result came out just fine. (I also ...


5

Eggs are about 10% fat by weight, a large egg is about 50g, so you would lose 5g of fat in the recipe per egg, which is just over a teaspoon of oil. Whether or not you add it depends on what you want out of the recipe. If you are taking eggs out to reduce fat then you don't need to add anything, if you want to keep the richness and consistency then a splash ...


4

Did you preheat the Oven? At our facility we preheat to 400F then lower to 360F just as soon as we close the door. Why? Muffins do not rise enough (we feel) in a warm oven. The time the oven door is open also cools the oven itself 30-40 degrees. So we preheat, then it's at the right temp as soon as the door is closed. We try to cook fast in a hot oven ...


4

BREAD BATTER CONVERSION CHART FOR DIFFERENT SIZE PANS One recipe of quick bread batter can be baked in pans of many different sizes. If you want to bake smaller loaves or muffins instead of a single larger loaf, use this chart to figure the baking time. Do remember that no matter which pan(s) you use, fill each only two-thirds full. If you have ...


4

Blueberries, despite the name, are purple, not blue. The appearance of being bluish in color is due to iridescence, not pigment. While you certainly could color the batter purple by pureeing some of the blueberries into it, it won't be blue. Think about the color or stain near the berries blueberry muffins you have eaten—it is a rich purple, not ...


4

Raspberries are going to leak a little and stain the batter of any muffin they are put into. Muffins with whole berries are going to have reduced shelf life due to this. Frozen raspberries would be even more leaky, as the freezing and thawing will soften them. To make a raspberry muffin, you have to accept that raspberry is very moist, so you cannot ...


4

I’ve made muffins with fresh raspberries. Increase the amount of flour you’re using, to help absorb the extra moisture. (I add somewhere in the range of 20-30g for 12 normal-size muffins.) Cut the berries up into smaller pieces, put the pieces on paper towels, and cover with more paper towels. This soaks up some of the juice, and distributes it better ...


4

In general, when making muffin recipes, you can replace around 1/2 of the oil (sometimes up to 2/3) with applesauce or mashed banana without significant problems. I don't know if you could get away with it in this particular case, as avocado would be a solid fat, so it might adversely affect the texture. I'd personally try replacing the avocado with either ...


4

Quick answer: No adjustments mandatory. To explain: You will need to adjust baking times when you change the "lump" of batter to be baked. Examples: Mini or Jumbo muffins instead of regular ones. Coffe cake in a loaf or round pan, bread or rolls. Rule of thumb: thicker cake, more time. That's why you use a wooden skewer to test for doneness. As far as the ...


4

You can actually steam a lot of cakes. The basic idea is seal the cake pan tightly with foil (or even plastic wrap if your can handle the temperature) and then place it in your steamer insert/basket. I find it takes about 40 min for it to cook all the way through. Makes for a super moist and fluffy cake. Here’s a random example I found online. Paper in ...


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