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28

There's a great experiment on Cooking Issues that deals with this very problem. The general advice is to not crowd the pan because of the concomitant release of water; however, the guys found that doing this is actually beneficial because, although a lot of water is initially released, by the time the liquid has eventually evaporated the mushrooms have ...


20

I would .. hydrate the dried mushrooms in enough near-boiling water to cover, plus a bit, for as long as you like. Lift the mushrooms out and reserve the soaking liquor. Sauté the soaked mushrooms along with the fresh If your recipe involves a reduction stage, of wine, stock, or some other ingredient, add the liquor, and reduce alongside.. Or, if there is ...


17

My advice: ditch the soaking liquid. Here's what I just tried. I divided my dried mushrooms up into 10 bowls: 5 with dried chanterelles and 5 with dried porcini. I added equal amounts of water to each at the following temperatures 10°C (directly from the tap), 40°C, 60°C, 80°C and 100°C (or as close as I could get). After soaking for 15 minutes I sampled ...


13

Alton Brown examined this question in the episode called Myth Busters. Good Eats: Myth Smashers See scenes 10 and 11. The conclusion is that you should wash the mushrooms in water. They do not soak water from a quick rinsing. SCENE 10 Home Office Know what this is? This is an instrument of torture. It's called a mushroom brush. Now when you'...


11

I have read a couple of experiments (in Dutch so I will not link them here) where people cooked the same dish from the same shrooms, with one batch brushed and the other washed. The washed batch did need higher temparature to actually fry, instead of just boiling in their own moisture and the texture in the finished dish remained different. There does seem ...


10

I don't think you can make a Beef Wellington without the obligatory mushrooms, it essentially becomes something else. The whole concept behind beef wellington is to keep the meat juices in by being surrounded by pastry but there's no reason why you shouldn't omit the mushrooms for something else. I really can't think of any other food substance that would ...


9

Agaricus bisporus is commonly found in two varieties a brown and a white variety both of them have a variety of aliases as you have already found out ... and the name portobella is used for mature fruiting bodies of both varieties. So you can find the brown variety in all sizes from tiny "button" mushrooms over closed and open small and big non-mature ...


9

Alton Brown, Harold McGee, Robert Wolke, and Kenji Lopez Alt have all tested washing mushrooms by weighing them pre and post wash, and found they absorb an insignificant amount of water that does not significantly affect cooking time. Both McGee and Wolke tested by soaking the mushroom for five minutes rather than simply rinsing. They all encourage washing ...


8

It's important to note that wash or no wash, mushrooms themselves already have a high water content so their ability to absorb more water is limited. Estimates I've found put the range between 75-90% water, depending on the type of mushroom. Cooks Illustrated, for example, puts it at 80%. Sources such as Cooks Illustrated, Alton Brown, Harold McGee, Robert ...


8

The basic technique that I've found effective is to "dry fry" them in a pan to allow water to cook off before adding any other wet or fat ingredients, including oil or butter. If you skip this step, you'll often end up with a bit of a rubbery texture. I recommend cooking them in a small cast-iron pan, but a nonstick pan will do. I usually season with little ...


8

Rehydrating dried fruits and vegetables in warm water is fast - mushrooms might take 15-20 minutes, though some varieties take longer, and it of course depends on how hot your water is. It would take a lot longer with cold water. You can still do it, and possibly more of the flavor will remain in the mushrooms (since you're not effectively cooking them ...


8

There are a handful of distinctive mushrooms that are usually safe to pick, even for a layman. This ain't one of them. This looks quite a lot like a member of the Amanitaceae family (shaped like an umbrella, with white "gills"), and people tend to avoid those because they all look similar, and some of them can kill you. If you don't know for certain what ...


7

I've looked through a number of recipes, and the vast majority of them indicate that you should cook the morels thoroughly (preferably in butter) first, before using them as a pizza topping or in an omelet. I did find at least one recipe for a morel omelet that did not call for pre-cooking the mushrooms, however. I must admit that I did my research a bit ...


7

Mushrooms contain a lot of water, so you'll never be able to avoid it completely. However, you can reduce it by: Frying in smaller batches, which prevents too much water being released at once, which prevents efficient evaporation. Not stirring the mushrooms too vigorously, especially early on in the process. The tendency is to add the mushrooms to the pan ...


7

Based on my experience with dried and fresh shiitake mushrooms, and the guidance from Gaku Homma in his book Japanese Country Cooking, I'd say that you will simply get different results with fresh shiitake. There's actually a fair amount of flavor concentration that happens as a side effect of dehydrating mushrooms, and this is particularly pronounced with ...


7

I don't like mushrooms much either, I've made wellingtons with pate mostly, although I've experimented with chopped up brussel sprouts with some success as well. One thing I would like to try is yellow lentils but haven't had the opportunity. You could still try mushrooms though if it's the texture your roommate doesn't like rather than the flavor. If it ...


7

Your fridge is infact below freezing temperature, perhaps just slightly. Water (the main liquid in mushrooms) never freezes at temperatures above freezing (0C/32F). Mushrooms have a lot of surface area and are very light so their temperature can match the fridge easier. Try placing dry lettuce there and you'll notice the same thing. If it's a small and ...


7

Caramelising is a chemical process in which sugars decompose under the influence of heat (pyrolisis). It happens to any heated sugars, no matter if they are free (as in heating refined sugar for making candy) or bound in something else (such as the sugars naturally occurring in an onion). The outcome of the process are compounds which have a dark color and ...


7

The only motivation I'm aware of for peeling button mushrooms other than wanting a very clean, white appearance is to remove dirt, dust, grit, compost, etc. from the surface without the trouble of brushing or washing. It's arguably quicker to peel mushrooms than to brush them (though not in my experience) and many people don't like washing them because they ...


7

This part of the mushroom is perfectly edible. It's a structure called a partial veil which protects the spore-producing gills on the underside of the mushroom cap, usually while the mushroom is still immature. They open as the cap grows larger, exposing the gills and releasing the spores which produce new mushrooms. It's pretty common to see these on white ...


6

Anything will spoil more quickly if cut than if whole. It's all a matter of surface area. The bacteria/fungi/mold/whatever can only attack the surface that is open to the air. When you cut the mushrooms, you open more surface up to attack, and hence they will be affected more quickly. This is equally true for dehydration and loss of flavour (by evaporation)...


6

Use the widest pan you can to maximize evaporation while you fry them, also, you can put them in a very low oven for an hour to draw some of the moisture out. Don't crowd the pan, make sure each one has some space. Also, don't wash them in water before cooking! Mushrooms are sponges, they absorb liquids. Wipe them with a dry cloth or paper towel instead to ...


6

I hate mushrooms too. The only time I ever made wellington, I simply put a mixture of onions and bacon and cheese in place of the mushroom layer. I first sprinkled parmesan cheese. Then I put a layer of finely chopped sauteed onions and then crumpled cooked bacon. It was fantastic and everyone there said it was the 'best thing they ever ate'. I realize this ...


6

Based on comments, the likely culprit is moisture cooking out of the mushrooms and into your other ingredients. Mushrooms contain a surprising amount of liquid, and when cooking them you'll see that they shrink down significantly due to moisture loss. If you're adding them to other ingredients, some of the resulting liquid is hanging around in the pan long ...


6

I just made mushroom/truffle risotto for lunch! No joke!! Here's what to do with the dried. First, rinse thoroughly, they're infamous for grit. Now soak them for one half an hour in a little bowl of the broth (hot) you intend to use for the risotto. No need to remove stems, just chop them up with the rest. After one half an hour, wring them out, using your ...


6

Short answer: It Depends. Long Answer: You are correct that the decision on precooking mushrooms before putting them on pizza is about controlling moisture. For some hefty mushrooms like portabellos, it's also about making sure that they cook fully. Here's what to factor in: What's the density of mushrooms per pizza area? That is, how much space ...


6

Every experienced forager knows that the first steps of preparation happen already at the place where you found the mushrooms. Most of what’s listed below is general advice for mushroom foraging, as it’s valid for your ash-tree boletes and hopefully helpful for other readers with similar questions. In the wild: Pick only what you consider fit to eat and ...


6

In Norway lots of people still pick their own mushrooms and the Norwegian safety rules for mushrooms picked in the wild do not apply to Champignons you buy in a supermarket in 99.99999% of all cases. ¹ Note ¹: Unless something went horribly wrong in the food supply chain.


6

Realize that the flavor of dried mushroom is different from fresh. You will probably use less, depending on the mushroom. However, to answer your question specifically, rehydrate first.


5

I answered a question like this previously. How to work with Dried Mushrooms? Cold water - the best way to keep the original flavour. It will take at least couple of hours. I would soak them in cold water for about 15 mins Pour all the water out. Put in fresh water and keep soaking it. I will do this step couple of times. Remember you may retain the ...


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