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57

As a straight answer to "why" it's the quantity of mustard oil in any given mustard type. There are many types of mustard, but the two you may find the most confusing visually are English & American. Though both are a fairly bright yellow in colour, that's about as far as the similarity goes. Mustard seeds themselves come in many different 'heats' - ...


16

"English mustard" is also yellow and very very different from typical American yellow mustard as I've encountered it with hot dogs or burgers (French's, for example). A smear of something like Colman's (a typical hot English mustard) has about as much flavour as a spoonful of hot dog yellow mustard. What you describe is typical for when you think you ...


6

Mustard often separates, it doesn't mean it's going bad. It's likely perfectly fine, mustard stays good for years in the refrigerator. Just stir it up before using it to recombine. As for why it doesn't separate unopened, sometimes it does. Often you are buying a product that's been manufactured recently, so it hasn't had time to separate yet.


5

The mustard is used as a flavouring - either you like whatever flavour the alternative mustard yields, or you don't - and as an added emulsifier. The emulsifier effect can be achieved with pretty much any mustard, be it english, french, or in powder form (mind flavor interaction with vinegar in that case...). The mayonnaise might even work without any ...


5

If want to sell mustard, make mustard, not a stretched fake mustard. You would be cheating your customers and depending on your location the authorities might be after you, too. The "sharpness" of a mustard is balanced by the ratios of different mustard seeds, white/yellow, brown or black and the temperatures used during preperation. Typically, vinager is ...


5

Mustard seeds and other spices are there for flavor only; it's perfectly safe to leave them out. But don't mess with amounts of salt or vinegar given in your recipe--those are important for preventing bacterial growth. If your recipe also contains bay leaf or grape leaf, those too can be omitted, but you pickles won't be as crisp. Likewise if you omit the ...


4

Food quality isn't binary; it doesn't go from perfectly good to perfectly bad in an instant. Even if it did, the time it would take depends on the storage temperature. And for non-liquid foods, it's possible that only a part went bad (how well does it mix?). So, you don't get a precise date, but a rough interval at which time the decay starts to set in. As ...


4

Yes, there is (generally) a significant taste difference between whole grain mustard and regular yellow mustard. Texture plays a part of it, but it is secondary to the overall difference in flavor. I say generally because there's a lot of variation in each, and some extremes of one type may approach some extremes of the other type in flavor. Yellow ...


4

There is not flour in mustard. Typical ingredients include sugars (usually brown), turmeric, paprika, garlic, and other flavoring spices. The mustard seed powder and the sugar compose most of the "structure" of the sauce. You would moderate the hotness by adding more sugar or mustard seed.


4

Just omit the mustard. In just about every recipe I have seen for beans, it is proportionally a very small component. And while we tend to think of mustard as being bold in flavor, it's really the vinegar that makes it seem that way. You should also stray from any recipes that call for store bought barbecue sauces, as many will contain mustard. Finally, ...


4

Horseradish has distinctive tones which you can't replicate from other ingredients, neither is there a single substitution you can make. The closest I think you would get is a mixture of ginger and mustard. I would try blitzing together some fresh ginger root and crushed mustard seed, maybe with a dash of vinegar. A good, strong prepared mustard might work, ...


4

Mustard can be used, but it might have a lot of vinegar in it and can clash with whatever you are doing. Maybe try doing something with mustard powder instead of prepared mustared. You could try, if you are luck to get some real fresh Wasabi roots; that would be close to the perfect substitution.


4

Mustard is mostly vinegar, so instead of diluting mustard with water, try vinegar, or vinegar and water.


4

Plastic usually does not pop, it bends slowly under the pressure differential. Metal usually bends quickly and pops when the vacuum in a jar is relieved. Some jars use thicker metal that wont bend, so you have to listen for the rushing intake of air. Sometimes now they replace air with nitrogen before sealing. You won't get a pop or any other sound from a ...


3

I don't think any kind of dilution will work. The water in your mustard jar is a lot more like mustard with the solids filtered out than mustard with extra liquid added. It's roughly in equilibrium with the mustard itself, so it's nice and full of all the mustard aromatics. If you add water, you reduce that concentration, and get something much less ...


3

Fermented vegetables can often provide the pungent, salty kick that is often desired from mustard. If he is not allergic to cabbage (which is a member of the same family, brassica), sauerkraut may be a good option. Similarly, other members of the brassica family, such as broccoli and collard greens, retain a similar bite, particularly when raw. You might try ...


3

What you are doing is not sterilizing the mustard. You just pasteurize it. If you just want to pasteurize the mustard: Yes, you can put the jars into the oven instead of water-bathing them. Jars, lids and the content are heated up to 100°C, so it's quite equivalent to water-bathing the jars - if not even better. Friends of mine put the jars with the lid ...


3

I came across this article. It explains where mustard get its heat from: Mustard seeds come from the mustard plant, a member of the cabbage family. They contain two sulphur compounds, myrosin and sinigrin, as well as an enzyme, myrosinase. When the seeds are broken and water is added, the enzyme breaks down the sulphur compounds. The result is the sharp ...


3

Here in Germany, mustard is sold in a variety of "grades". The mildest variety is called "sweet mustard" or "Bavarian sweet mustard" (süß/Bayrisch süß), it is usually dark/brown in color and only roughly ground. Then come mild - medium hot (mittelscharf) - hot (scharf) - extra hot (extra scharf). These are usually (but not always) also finer ground. There ...


3

I'm no chemist or anything, but the sugar is probably at fault. Honey is a saturated sugar solution. So saturated, in fact, that it tends to crystalize over time. Mustard is a mix of solids (mustard seeds) with liquids (water, vinegar and others). Its consistency is determined by how much liquid the solids can absorb. By mixing both together, you add lots ...


2

Expiration dates for safety are not about "usually okay". Sure, if you keep mustard in good conditions, it'll probably last longer than that most of the time. But things are labeled with expiration dates that are designed to guarantee that everyone will be safe. Yes, that means that most of the time they're overly conservative. But the alternative is to let ...


2

I'm not sure what the consumer liability laws are like in Brazil, but I expect that they 'good until' dates well short of their 'actual' lifespan to protect the manufacturers from lawsuits for people who don't read the labels anyway and get sick on 3 year old mayo... A second reason they set short shelf life for such things is to encourage you to buy it ...


2

Replacing about 60 percent of the water with rice vinegar smooths it out a bit. It's still spicy heat, but not so harsh. When I started using the rice vinegar, mine started tasting a lot more like what we are served in Chinese restaurants.


2

Palatable is a very vague term. I think that some seed and vinegar preparations would have promise (sesame seeds and rice vinegar, perhaps lightly sweetened?), but others would be horrible (I can't imagine a caraway & vinegar paste being good for most things). Even a condiment that would normally be gross (the caraway one mentioned) could be good in the ...


2

Prepared whole grain or course ground mustards usually have less of a vinegar taste and more spice/kick, similar to what you get with raw horseradish. If you go with mustard, I'd choose one of this variety rather than standard yellow mustard.


2

When you make an acidic mustard paste it can take a long time before you get the pungency of mustard, but the benefit is it will last longer in the fridge. If you used just cold water and not wine or vinegar, it will get mustardy more quickly, but the product will also have a shorter shelf life.


2

If the rose is dry this should work. The combination of flavours you've listed should go well with a dry wine


2

Checking out recipes for brown beer mustard online, it looks like there's a pretty even split between cooked and uncooked. Be advised that cooking will not remove all the alcohol - this question Cooking away alcohol and answers may help you should you decide to cook the mustard. I can not answer as to how much beer would be safe for a child to consume (...


2

It is probably fine without extra cooking. The recipes for beer mustard suggest that beer would likely be a third or less of the volume of the finished mustard (the major ingredients I saw being mustard seeds, vinegar, and any other flavorings). Beer tends to be quite low in alcohol, as a rule, averaging about 5% (I've seen 3%-8%, and a few outliers with ...


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