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57

As a straight answer to "why" it's the quantity of mustard oil in any given mustard type. There are many types of mustard, but the two you may find the most confusing visually are English & American. Though both are a fairly bright yellow in colour, that's about as far as the similarity goes. Mustard seeds themselves come in many different 'heats' - ...


21

The difference in Mayonnaise is varied. For example, in the USA Hellman's and Best Foods Mayonnaise (Same company by the way and same product) add sugar to reduce the acidity. Regional tastes are also taken into account by the manufacturers. Hellman's mayo in Europe has different ingredient percentages than the same mayo uses for the American market. Many ...


16

"English mustard" is also yellow and very very different from typical American yellow mustard as I've encountered it with hot dogs or burgers (French's, for example). A smear of something like Colman's (a typical hot English mustard) has about as much flavour as a spoonful of hot dog yellow mustard. What you describe is typical for when you think you ...


11

The German „Mittelscharfer Senf“ ist pretty wimpy compared to the average English mustard that looks deceptively similar. You need something that packs more punch, if you can’t get proper English mustard (the Coleman’s in the other answer is occasionally available in German stores), a Dijon mustard (Maille is a commonly seen brand) will do, or a „Scharfer ...


6

Mustard often separates, it doesn't mean it's going bad. It's likely perfectly fine, mustard stays good for years in the refrigerator. Just stir it up before using it to recombine. As for why it doesn't separate unopened, sometimes it does. Often you are buying a product that's been manufactured recently, so it hasn't had time to separate yet.


6

The mustard is used as a flavouring - either you like whatever flavour the alternative mustard yields, or you don't - and as an added emulsifier. The emulsifier effect can be achieved with pretty much any mustard, be it english, french, or in powder form (mind flavor interaction with vinegar in that case...). The mayonnaise might even work without any ...


6

I’m guessing that English mustard would refer to a mustard with more heat and stronger flavour than American (yellow) mustard. The Brits in my family usually mean Colman’s brand when they ask for mustard, and a little goes a long way. And the jar says original English mustard, for whatever that’s worth. I am unfamiliar with the German mustard you linked, ...


5

If want to sell mustard, make mustard, not a stretched fake mustard. You would be cheating your customers and depending on your location the authorities might be after you, too. The "sharpness" of a mustard is balanced by the ratios of different mustard seeds, white/yellow, brown or black and the temperatures used during preperation. Typically, vinager is ...


5

Mustard seeds and other spices are there for flavor only; it's perfectly safe to leave them out. But don't mess with amounts of salt or vinegar given in your recipe--those are important for preventing bacterial growth. If your recipe also contains bay leaf or grape leaf, those too can be omitted, but you pickles won't be as crisp. Likewise if you omit the ...


4

Horseradish has distinctive tones which you can't replicate from other ingredients, neither is there a single substitution you can make. The closest I think you would get is a mixture of ginger and mustard. I would try blitzing together some fresh ginger root and crushed mustard seed, maybe with a dash of vinegar. A good, strong prepared mustard might work, ...


4

Plastic usually does not pop, it bends slowly under the pressure differential. Metal usually bends quickly and pops when the vacuum in a jar is relieved. Some jars use thicker metal that wont bend, so you have to listen for the rushing intake of air. Sometimes now they replace air with nitrogen before sealing. You won't get a pop or any other sound from a ...


4

There is not flour in mustard. Typical ingredients include sugars (usually brown), turmeric, paprika, garlic, and other flavoring spices. The mustard seed powder and the sugar compose most of the "structure" of the sauce. You would moderate the hotness by adding more sugar or mustard seed.


4

Just omit the mustard. In just about every recipe I have seen for beans, it is proportionally a very small component. And while we tend to think of mustard as being bold in flavor, it's really the vinegar that makes it seem that way. You should also stray from any recipes that call for store bought barbecue sauces, as many will contain mustard. Finally, ...


4

Mustard can be used, but it might have a lot of vinegar in it and can clash with whatever you are doing. Maybe try doing something with mustard powder instead of prepared mustared. You could try, if you are luck to get some real fresh Wasabi roots; that would be close to the perfect substitution.


4

Mustard is mostly vinegar, so instead of diluting mustard with water, try vinegar, or vinegar and water.


4

The "easiest solution" would be to go with Gordons recipe that doesn't use mustard Ingredients 2 x 400g beef fillets Olive oil, for frying 500g mixture of wild mushrooms, cleaned 1 thyme sprig, leaves only 500g puff pastry 8 slices of Parma ham 2 egg yolks, beaten with 1 tbsp water and a pinch of salt Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper ...


3

I don't think any kind of dilution will work. The water in your mustard jar is a lot more like mustard with the solids filtered out than mustard with extra liquid added. It's roughly in equilibrium with the mustard itself, so it's nice and full of all the mustard aromatics. If you add water, you reduce that concentration, and get something much less ...


3

Fermented vegetables can often provide the pungent, salty kick that is often desired from mustard. If he is not allergic to cabbage (which is a member of the same family, brassica), sauerkraut may be a good option. Similarly, other members of the brassica family, such as broccoli and collard greens, retain a similar bite, particularly when raw. You might try ...


3

What you are doing is not sterilizing the mustard. You just pasteurize it. If you just want to pasteurize the mustard: Yes, you can put the jars into the oven instead of water-bathing them. Jars, lids and the content are heated up to 100°C, so it's quite equivalent to water-bathing the jars - if not even better. Friends of mine put the jars with the lid ...


3

I'm no chemist or anything, but the sugar is probably at fault. Honey is a saturated sugar solution. So saturated, in fact, that it tends to crystalize over time. Mustard is a mix of solids (mustard seeds) with liquids (water, vinegar and others). Its consistency is determined by how much liquid the solids can absorb. By mixing both together, you add lots ...


3

Here in Germany, mustard is sold in a variety of "grades". The mildest variety is called "sweet mustard" or "Bavarian sweet mustard" (süß/Bayrisch süß), it is usually dark/brown in color and only roughly ground. Then come mild - medium hot (mittelscharf) - hot (scharf) - extra hot (extra scharf). These are usually (but not always) also finer ground. There ...


3

From experience, mayo across Europe differs widely from country to country. Even within a country, the differences brand to brand are huge. Just compare the colours (hey, that tells you I'm in the UK) of various brands. In the UK Hellmans is not mustarded (Rapeseed Oil (78%), Water, Pasteurised Free Range Egg & Egg Yolk (7.9%), Spirit Vinegar, Salt, ...


2

It can depend on the manufacturer, and on the lid. You may be associating the pop with metal lids, where you'll often see is a small circle in the middle of the lid, which is part of tamper-proofing. When the jar is sealed at the factory, it is sealed under pressure so that the circle is depressed. When you open the jar at home, the pressure equalizes, and ...


2

When you make an acidic mustard paste it can take a long time before you get the pungency of mustard, but the benefit is it will last longer in the fridge. If you used just cold water and not wine or vinegar, it will get mustardy more quickly, but the product will also have a shorter shelf life.


2

Prepared whole grain or course ground mustards usually have less of a vinegar taste and more spice/kick, similar to what you get with raw horseradish. If you go with mustard, I'd choose one of this variety rather than standard yellow mustard.


2

This is because all the Indian brands I know use the cold press method. In that process, some moisture is left in the oil that makes foam while heating. It's absolutely normal, and it's good that it has no chemicals. Hope this will help.


2

Palatable is a very vague term. I think that some seed and vinegar preparations would have promise (sesame seeds and rice vinegar, perhaps lightly sweetened?), but others would be horrible (I can't imagine a caraway & vinegar paste being good for most things). Even a condiment that would normally be gross (the caraway one mentioned) could be good in the ...


2

If the rose is dry this should work. The combination of flavours you've listed should go well with a dry wine


2

Checking out recipes for brown beer mustard online, it looks like there's a pretty even split between cooked and uncooked. Be advised that cooking will not remove all the alcohol - this question Cooking away alcohol and answers may help you should you decide to cook the mustard. I can not answer as to how much beer would be safe for a child to consume (...


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