9

Well, the most obvious difference is that the two "better" restaurants you mention serve brick-oven style pizza, which is probably quite different from the cooking method in a "cheap sub-style pizza place." Brick oven pizzas are generally cooked at a much higher temperature for a much shorter time, and the surface they are cooked on causes significant ...


7

It sounds like you're doing several things differently than the recipe (different flour, different temperature, different baking surface...) though I don't actually see shaping/baking instructions on the recipe you linked. If you want to stick closer to that recipe (than the other answers...), here's a few other thoughts of potential problems and a few ...


5

Sorry to dig this up months later, but it's a great question, one that I've struggled with also. I have baked pizzas in a 700-800F wood oven, and had the same complaint: beautiful coloration, decent spring, but not moist enough. I'm using dough that's much closer to the Tartine method hydration level than typical pizza dough, so I don't think that the answer ...


5

You might have better luck with cornmeal or semolina flour on the peel, those have a "ball bearing" quality to them, even in addition to some regular flour on the dough. Be sure your pizza is sliding easily before you move to the oven. Practice the motion a bit with just some plain dough some day. There is a bit it a trick to it, a left to right motion to ...


5

The linked question in comments makes some general points about dedicated pizza ovens. However, to address the final question about temperature differences, the general answer is that it depends on the style of pizza you'd prefer to make and the dough/topping characteristics. Some doughs and pizza styles are designed to be cooked at lower temperatures for ...


4

The semolina flour has a higher temp rating and is more compatible to the pizza dough that results in a gentle sweet taste. Clean the pan in the oven after each pizza with the hand mitt to take away the cooked flour otherwise this browning flavor gets transferred to the bottom of the crust. White or wheat flours will burn easily and leave a chalky taste. ...


3

I'm also a lover of so called "Vera Pizza Napoletana". By coincidence, I made yesterday this Neapolitan Pizza style using this Serious Eats method. Also see this step-by-step instructions. It's all about heat capacity, conduction and radiation. You don't need a 1000°F oven to bake your pizza because doing it on a skillet will have almost the same effect ...


3

Here's what works for me. 50% wheat flour 50% either cornmeal, semolina, or rice flour This mix causes the bottom of the dough to absorb some of the wheat flour to prevent the bottom from being 'wet' and as @jolenealaska says, the other component acts like 'ball bearings' to keep the dough moving. I usually keep this mix in a shaker for general purpose ...


2

I did some more research on this question and found that the reason cheap pizza places tend to have similar, low-quality crust is because they use something called "parbaked" dough. This is dough that has been made ahead of time in a factory and partially baked. Various suppliers sell this to hole in the wall pizza places. For example, in my area, "The Pizza ...


1

Probably so that the gluten can relax before you go for the final forming. By forming it into a ball you are starting it towards "pizza pie disk shape" from "formless mass of dough." If it rests for 10 minutes or more in that shape, proceeding to further shape it into a disk will go easier (and further, if desired), with less spring-back from the gluten ...


1

The source of the bubbles is trapped carbon dioxide, which was created by fermentation in the pizza dough. The problem with using a BBQ grill to make pizza is that you simply can not contain the high heat needed for the perfect crust. As you probably know, a traditional pizza oven has a low ceiling, with its opening at the front. This allows, not only the ...


1

The bubbles in Neapolitan pizza come from air, emitted by live yeast in the pizza dough, expanding when it's headed up. While bubbles can be created by baking the pizza on a stone, it's not required. You'll also get bubbles by just rubbing some oil on the grill grates and placing the pizza dough directly on the grill. The key to getting bubbles is having ...


1

The best pizza is cooked hot and fast. It's what gives you nice browned cheese and crispy crust without turning the whole thing into either some gooey undercooked mess, or overcooked throughout into cardboard. You want the heat to reach the center of the pizza layers just enough while toasting the outer layers top and bottom. A preheated pizza stone helps ...


1

Perhaps this is an obvious answer - but if your center is too dry, add moisture. If you're happy with the edges and the rest of the pizza, then meddling with other variables (like time, temp, or flour) might disturb the things that work - a possibility to keep in mind for if smaller adjustments don't work, but not my first adjustment. For myself, when I ...


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