38

Melted and re-hardened sugar (including caramel) is very difficult to remove through mechanical action, but trivial to remove by soaking. Just pour in enough hot water to cover the sugar and wait an hour or so. (If oil was used, add some dish soap.) For a quicker turnaround, you can simmer the pot with the water on the stove; 10 minutes should be enough to ...


23

There are two parts to this question, the stated part, and the unstated "are you really frying an egg if there is no oil?" For the first part, most manufacturers of non-stick pans claim that their product makes oil unnecessary, and generally I've found that to be true. A little oil helps, but "necessary" might be a stretch. To maximize your non-stickyness ...


21

What makes a good pan? The main properties of a metal pan that are of interest to a cook are: Evenness of heat distribution. Every burner produces more heat in some spots than others. The better the pan conduct heat, the more this heat is evened out before it is conducted into the food being cooked, which is important to prevent local hotspots in the pan, ...


18

I have a ceramic-coated pan too, and always treated it with care (plastic utensils, no overheating, etc.) It failed too, after some time (I think I've had it for 9 months now, and used frequently). Unlike a failed Teflon pan, it does not look or feel any different. But while at the beginning it was superslick, with everything gliding right off it in a ...


14

This is the microstructure of SAE 304, a steel type commonly used in pans: At this magnification, its "pores" look like cracks. Now see it at other magnifications (still a SAE 304, other types of steel look completely different, especially if you look at martenistic steels): It gets even more complicated than that, because steel structure differs between ...


14

I work for a carbon steel cookware producer in China and just like Athanasius, I too have become interested in the question of "Do pan “pores” exist, what are they, and what are their effects?" I have also watched the RouxBe video about making a stainless steel pan more non-stick through pre-heating. To summarize the main point, it says to heat the pan until ...


12

Judging from the picture, the knife gets thinner towards the spine after reaching a point of maximum thickness somewhere in the middle of the blade. This means a straight piece of sticky food cannot stick to all of the blade face at once unless it actually bends to conform to its curvature - and marzipan is a rather stiff medium. Also, since the food will ...


9

Ensure that you're not washing them until after the pan has cooled - the cooler water can cause warping if you do like my fiancee and take them right off the heat into the sink to soak.


9

Crepes were made long before teflon was invented. I use a quality steel pan and non stick spray. I reapply the spray every 3rd or 4th crepe to avoid sticking. Everything else is temperature control. If your temps are too high then the crepes will toast and burn before they set on top. If the temp is too low then they are more prone to sticking. It takes ...


8

Are you sure that the "non-stick" properties of your square pan are still OK. The pan in the picture looks pretty tired. I also note that the pan in the "successful video" has a ridged bottom. This gives more surface area to the bottom of the pan and gets more heat up into the egg mixture to cook it.


8

Based on a search of sources covering health risks around Teflon (PTFE) cookware, nobody has found any evidence that cooking with previously overheated cookware is dangerous to your health. Breathing the fumes during overheating is bad for you, and cookware that has been overheated may cease to be nonstick, even though it looks OK: Teflon™ nonstick ...


7

I have a similar (but not the same) frying pan. Your problem is, most likely, a lack of heat, not a lack of seasoning. I always set my frying pan, empty, on a low/medium fire. When it starts to come to temperature, I raise the temperature to high. [If I have something else to cook, I do that before cooking eggs. This way, I make sure the iron is hot]. When ...


6

I always add butter, as much for the flavor as to keep the eggs from sticking. In scrambled eggs, butter is as necessary for me as salt and pepper.


6

The theories that have come out in comments are most likely right on. Cast iron is special in how well it retains heat. Give cast iron ample preheating time, and you can drop in cold food without a significant drop in the temperature of the pan. That equals crispy. Even a pretty good and heavy non-stick pan is not going to give sweet potatoes the kind of ...


6

I suspect @Stephie is correct in thinking they may be over proofed. Having said that, you could try the method that is used when making crullers. Place shaped donuts on parchment paper that has been sprayed with non-stick cooking spray. Cut the paper into individual squares (each donut should have enough space to raise without expanding off the paper). Let ...


6

Just use a glass pot, Corningware make some decent ones that can be used on a stove. But any glass pot designed to work on a stove with direct heat/flame exposure should work in this case. If you are worried about uneven heating or hot spots on a gas range due to less conductive glass, you can use a cast iron or aluminum heat diffuser plate under the glass ...


6

Quality austenitic stainless steel* should certainly not rust from boiling plain water (excepting MAYBE some rust in places like handle weld spots - the metallurgy is upset in these spots, and usually they don't touch the food anyway.), given that cookware is made from it that is perfectly dishwasher proof, and won't rust if salted water is boiled in it. If ...


6

It looks indeed like the Sourdough and the anti-stick disagree with each other... though the extent of it is something I have neither seen nor heard about yet! May be the non-stick version you do have. If the dough was left in the pan to rise for a while, that may have been part of it. But I have to say, except for the issue with your pan, the bread looks ...


6

Yes high heat can burn off the nonstick coating. My roommate's girlfriend did one of my pans that way, heating it very hot while dry. It was pretty spectacular. Everyone in the house had this weird little cough like from dilute pepper spray. Anything silver in the house tarnished. I presume the nonstick was burned off and floated around in the house, ...


5

Eggs and Crepes Get a cheapish lightweight Teflon pan just for eggs and crepes. To cook these foods you never need to go over 200°C so no health concerns. Make sure everyone in the household KNOWS not to use them for anything else, or to put oil of fat in them. That way they will last a few years of good service. In general Teflon pans never last long no ...


5

Rolling when the consistency is correct is important. Looking at your example I would say that attempt needed more heat. The egg should be cooked on the bottom, while being 'jelly-like' on the top. This makes the roll stick to itself without sticking to the pan. You also need to just wipe down the pan with more oil after each roll. When in doubt turn up the ...


5

I make ceramics (not pans) for a living. Maybe it isn't the ceramic layer itself that fails but the glaze used to cover it. Glaze is molten glass and can be scratched. It will also deteriorate in the dishwasher. I tend to take my (deteriorated) plates and cups (the ones where the tea stains no longer come out in the dishwasher) and refire them in the kiln. ...


5

PTFE (Also known by Dupont's trade name, teflon) can decompose. For this reason PTFE pans are not recommended for broiler use. Per the Dupont Key Safety Questions: At high temperatures, the quality of the coating may begin to deteriorate — it may discolor or lose its nonstick quality. This can begin to occur at temperatures above 500°F (260°C). If ...


5

tldr The point of oiling a stainless steel pan is to lubricate the (already mostly smooth) surface, and the point of seasoning cast iron is to fill the irregularities with a layer of non-stick polymer that results from burning off the oil. Are the pores real? This depends on the material the pan is made of. Cast iron is not porous in the way sponges and ...


5

Please try the South Indian method of making Dosai/Dosa. You can use any type of Griddle such as non-stick, cast iron, stainless steel or even Hard Anodised. The trick lies in treating the griddle with oil and regulating the heat underneath. Take half Tsp of oil on a paper tissue/napkin, apply a thin layer of oil by rubbing/applying the oily tissue on the ...


5

The way it is flaking off (flakes sticking out instead of breaking off) suggests it is an old-school (non reinforced) teflon coating, not an enamel. If the underlying metal is actually stainless (not likely to be carbon, would not look bright after that abuse) steel, you could make it usable, but it is unlikely to be worth the effort - the remaining coating ...


5

There is no current evidence that already-degraded PTFE (Teflon) poses any toxicity risks in its solid form. To quote the University of California School of Public Health: There’s no evidence, however, that in­gesting any PTFE flakes that might have degraded from the pan’s surface over time poses any health risk, and the American Cancer Society notes ...


4

This most frequently happens with thinner pans used on too small of a burner. Effectively what you're doing is heating up the center of the pan so that it expands, but the outside edge hasn't heated up yet. As the center can't go out, it goes up (or down). You either want to make sure that you're using an appropriately sized burner for the pan, or you can ...


4

I tried seasoning an aluminium kawali and was pretty successful doing this. I cleaned it very well and then layered it with a bit of oil (use peanut or canola) and then baked it outside on the bbq (or oven) for 30mins each time and then reapplying oil when it’s cooled down to touch. Important and ensure your kawali is upside down when baking and remove any ...


4

I don't want to disappoint you, but I have never been able to remove burnt-on pepepr juices - and in my case, they are on stainless steel, which can be cleaned with much harsher methods than non-stick. Most of the stuff went away, but small spots remained on my pot too. I would advise to leave out all scrubbing. It is not very efficient even on steel, and ...


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