38

Melted and re-hardened sugar (including caramel) is very difficult to remove through mechanical action, but trivial to remove by soaking. Just pour in enough hot water to cover the sugar and wait an hour or so. (If oil was used, add some dish soap.) For a quicker turnaround, you can simmer the pot with the water on the stove; 10 minutes should be enough to ...


35

I'd pre-cut them myself - I tend to cut mine in the tin using a plastic spatula; after all they're soft and easy to cut. Then There are stiff plastic knives (for some reason sold for use on lettuce). They're much better than metal and will easily cut brownies. If you did want something disposable, some of the wooden disposable cutlery is surprisingly ...


27

Don't use flaxseed oil, it's one of the worst. Something I only discovered recently is it's not just the smoke point you should be concerned about, it's the iodine number. This is important when it comes to the oil's polymerisation to make your coating. The lower the iodine number, the harder the resulting polymer finish. The smoke point should be used as a ...


25

First of all, if your baking sheet is nonstick you may not need baking paper at all. If it is not, then either directly greasing the baking sheet, or putting tinfoil on it and greasing that works reasonably well as a substitute.


21

In Spain it's very common to "grease and flour coating" to any baking mold or tray! It is quite easy! Get some butter, apply it to the tray evenly, add some flour (regular flour works) and with your hands tapping on the mold or tray, make sure it gets evenly spread! It will be easier if you see it by yourself! Below you can see very short videos! ...


16

You can use soft cutters for some baked goods, but not for all. Wherever you need a sharp cutting implement, the solution is to change not the knife, but the cutting surface. I have three typical options there: Bake with a paper layer under the batter. Probably the most useful for something like brownies and other things which stay in the tin and tend to ...


15

This is the microstructure of SAE 304, a steel type commonly used in pans: At this magnification, its "pores" look like cracks. Now see it at other magnifications (still a SAE 304, other types of steel look completely different, especially if you look at martenistic steels): It gets even more complicated than that, because steel structure differs between ...


15

I work for a carbon steel cookware producer in China and just like Athanasius, I too have become interested in the question of "Do pan “pores” exist, what are they, and what are their effects?" I have also watched the RouxBe video about making a stainless steel pan more non-stick through pre-heating. To summarize the main point, it says to heat the pan until ...


12

Judging from the picture, the knife gets thinner towards the spine after reaching a point of maximum thickness somewhere in the middle of the blade. This means a straight piece of sticky food cannot stick to all of the blade face at once unless it actually bends to conform to its curvature - and marzipan is a rather stiff medium. Also, since the food will ...


10

Crepes were made long before teflon was invented. I use a quality steel pan and non stick spray. I reapply the spray every 3rd or 4th crepe to avoid sticking. Everything else is temperature control. If your temps are too high then the crepes will toast and burn before they set on top. If the temp is too low then they are more prone to sticking. It takes ...


9

I don't have a specific remedy for the seasoning, as there are lots of things that could have gone wrong. I suspect if this was a new Lodge pan, there may have been some issues with the added seasoning layers integrating well and sticking to the seasoning Lodge already puts on its pans. (I assume this pan was already seasoned -- i.e., dark black -- when it ...


8

Based on a search of sources covering health risks around Teflon (PTFE) cookware, nobody has found any evidence that cooking with previously overheated cookware is dangerous to your health. Breathing the fumes during overheating is bad for you, and cookware that has been overheated may cease to be nonstick, even though it looks OK: Teflon™ nonstick ...


8

All Teflon pans are non-stick, but not all non-stick pans are Teflon ;-) Teflon, when new, is one of the slippiest substances known to man. Nothing will adhere to it, not even oil. When new, you can have a hard time getting an even coating of oil unless you make it deep enough to fill a base layer. The oil will be more attracted to itself than to the pan. ...


8

At my house, we simply grease our pans with some olive oil, spreading it around with a piece of tissue. Sometimes, we dust our pans with all purpose flour instead. The flour dusting takes away a little of the crispness, but I like it more than the grease option because it feels healthier.


7

I have a similar (but not the same) frying pan. Your problem is, most likely, a lack of heat, not a lack of seasoning. I always set my frying pan, empty, on a low/medium fire. When it starts to come to temperature, I raise the temperature to high. [If I have something else to cook, I do that before cooking eggs. This way, I make sure the iron is hot]. When ...


6

I always add butter, as much for the flavor as to keep the eggs from sticking. In scrambled eggs, butter is as necessary for me as salt and pepper.


6

The theories that have come out in comments are most likely right on. Cast iron is special in how well it retains heat. Give cast iron ample preheating time, and you can drop in cold food without a significant drop in the temperature of the pan. That equals crispy. Even a pretty good and heavy non-stick pan is not going to give sweet potatoes the kind of ...


6

I suspect @Stephie is correct in thinking they may be over proofed. Having said that, you could try the method that is used when making crullers. Place shaped donuts on parchment paper that has been sprayed with non-stick cooking spray. Cut the paper into individual squares (each donut should have enough space to raise without expanding off the paper). Let ...


6

Just use a glass pot, Corningware make some decent ones that can be used on a stove. But any glass pot designed to work on a stove with direct heat/flame exposure should work in this case. If you are worried about uneven heating or hot spots on a gas range due to less conductive glass, you can use a cast iron or aluminum heat diffuser plate under the glass ...


6

Quality austenitic stainless steel* should certainly not rust from boiling plain water (excepting MAYBE some rust in places like handle weld spots - the metallurgy is upset in these spots, and usually they don't touch the food anyway.), given that cookware is made from it that is perfectly dishwasher proof, and won't rust if salted water is boiled in it. If ...


6

It looks indeed like the Sourdough and the anti-stick disagree with each other... though the extent of it is something I have neither seen nor heard about yet! May be the non-stick version you do have. If the dough was left in the pan to rise for a while, that may have been part of it. But I have to say, except for the issue with your pan, the bread looks ...


6

Yes high heat can burn off the nonstick coating. My roommate's girlfriend did one of my pans that way, heating it very hot while dry. It was pretty spectacular. Everyone in the house had this weird little cough like from dilute pepper spray. Anything silver in the house tarnished. I presume the nonstick was burned off and floated around in the house, ...


5

PTFE (Also known by Dupont's trade name, teflon) can decompose. For this reason PTFE pans are not recommended for broiler use. Per the Dupont Key Safety Questions: At high temperatures, the quality of the coating may begin to deteriorate — it may discolor or lose its nonstick quality. This can begin to occur at temperatures above 500°F (260°C). If ...


5

There is no really good solution for this, as non-stick pans are by nature slick, and oils bead on them. My preferred solution is to use the right tool/technique for the job. Breaded items are normally meant to be fried in a puddle of oil at least half as high as the item (so it will have been submerged after flipping). If you insist on frying them in less ...


5

I make ceramics (not pans) for a living. Maybe it isn't the ceramic layer itself that fails but the glaze used to cover it. Glaze is molten glass and can be scratched. It will also deteriorate in the dishwasher. I tend to take my (deteriorated) plates and cups (the ones where the tea stains no longer come out in the dishwasher) and refire them in the kiln. ...


5

This most frequently happens with thinner pans used on too small of a burner. Effectively what you're doing is heating up the center of the pan so that it expands, but the outside edge hasn't heated up yet. As the center can't go out, it goes up (or down). You either want to make sure that you're using an appropriately sized burner for the pan, or you can ...


5

tldr The point of oiling a stainless steel pan is to lubricate the (already mostly smooth) surface, and the point of seasoning cast iron is to fill the irregularities with a layer of non-stick polymer that results from burning off the oil. Are the pores real? This depends on the material the pan is made of. Cast iron is not porous in the way sponges and ...


5

Please try the South Indian method of making Dosai/Dosa. You can use any type of Griddle such as non-stick, cast iron, stainless steel or even Hard Anodised. The trick lies in treating the griddle with oil and regulating the heat underneath. Take half Tsp of oil on a paper tissue/napkin, apply a thin layer of oil by rubbing/applying the oily tissue on the ...


5

America's Test Kitchen says that good quality nonstick pans last them about six months. They're presumably cooking with them several times a day, so if you use it once every couple days, and are as good as they are about not doing things that'll damage the coating, you might get a few years. So your experience sounds roughly normal. As another data point, ...


5

The way it is flaking off (flakes sticking out instead of breaking off) suggests it is an old-school (non reinforced) teflon coating, not an enamel. If the underlying metal is actually stainless (not likely to be carbon, would not look bright after that abuse) steel, you could make it usable, but it is unlikely to be worth the effort - the remaining coating ...


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