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46

It's Thai, but it's a relatively new dish as it doesn't date back when the country was called Siam, and it uses Chinese style noodles and preparation (with Thai flavors). There was a coup against the monarchy in 1932; in 1938 Plaek Phibunsongkhram (aka Phibun) came to power as prime minister. Phibun ordered the creation of a new national dish, "Gway Teow ...


17

It's true. I've done it quite a few times, before the 'no boil' packaged varieties were commonly available (if they even existed ... this was ~15 years ago) Unfortunately, I haven't done it for many years, so I'm quite out of practice. (found out I had a problem with dairy, so lasagne isn't something I make anymore) From what I remember, you needed to ...


17

Par-boiling the noodles at home would allow you to finish cooking them with just hot water. I would boil your chosen noodles 2 minutes under the package recommended time. Then rinse and chill the noodles and toss with a bit of oil and chill it. Take this to work in an insulated bag with an ice pack. A "saucy" noodle dish would be simpler to prepare at the ...


16

The short answer is yes, they can come in a curly form. There are several types of fresh noodle used in Rāmen, which can be classified mainly according to thickness and shape. Noodles are classified in shape into the straight sutorēto-men (ストレート麺), the curly chijire-men(縮れ面), and the more rare flat hirauchi-men(平打ち麺) . With the exception of the flat type, ...


15

OK I can read Chinese and let me tell you the answer: the noodles you bought are made by eggs. They're not made by rice. (FYI, there are TWO kinds noodles called "Rice Noodles", they are actually made by rice. The two kinds varies in thickness). You can first make soup noodles to grasp the texture of the noodles you bought. Try undercook and overcook a bit, ...


13

Looking at your recipe I see two issues: Two eggs plus 1/4 cup extra liquid is likely too much for one cup of flour. My rule of thumb is one egg per 100g flour (that's the "cheap" version from the "poorer" regions that requires a bit extra liquid, more on this later). One cup of flour is about 120 g, so I would guestimate 5/6 of a cup. But you can wing it a ...


12

Round lo mein noodles look veeeeery similar to spaghetti: Spaghetti Lo mein The biggest difference, ingredient-wise is that dried pasta (mostly?) does not contain eggs and lo mein noodles do. I know that at least once shopping mall food court chinese food place I've eaten from uses spaghetti for their lo mein. It's kind of obvious, but it's not bad. I ...


10

I think the problem here is that the definitions overlap quite a bit, which is always a good cause for confusion. Pasta is defined as shaped dough made of Durum wheat and boiled in water. That is the traditional pasta in my opinion. Noodles are uaully long and thin, and can be made of any starchy material, like rice or even beans. Basically, things like ...


10

Usually it's best to cook dried noodles in boiling water, and drain and rinse them in cold water when they are done. This does a couple of things: helps ensure that the noodle is equally cooked all the way through (instead of getting overcooked on the outside by the time the centre is cooked). by using separate water, you don't fill your broth with starch, ...


10

If it were me, I'd cook the pasta seperately (possibly in some of the broth), and only combine them just before it was to go out in the buffet. You might also want to take a look at How do canned soup companies keep their noodles from absorbing all the liquid in the can?


9

Pasta (by which I infer you mean dried, Italian-style semolina pasta) is edible raw, right out of the package. It is not, however, palatable. If you soak it in water, it will hydrate and soften over time, but that is not the same as cooking it. True cooking also cooks the proteins and takes away that raw starchy taste. There is no way to achieve that ...


9

Another option is Smoked Paprika. As Jolene wisely cautions, those liquid smoke products are very strong. And even though it might be "natural" smoke flavor, it can lend a "synthetic" taste to delicate foods. Smoked Paprika has a much more subtle smokiness. Of course, it will also add color and additional flavor of its own. It sounds to me like this would ...


8

To add smoky flavor, you can add a drop of liquid smoke. Do it drop by drop - be careful, it's easy to use too much and not be able to taste anything else. Liquid smoke is actually made by distilling smoke and it really does add a flavor much like putting the food in a smoker (or a big fire).


7

I think those are chow fun noodles, cut them to the desired size if not already cut, soak it in cool water for about 7-15 mins then hand unroll them. That how I was taught anyways. The packaging looks tight too so possibly cut the sides off too, should help it stop from clumping and allow the water to penetrate and separate them.


7

All the Chinese noodles that I have ever cooked were made from salted dough, while Italian dried pasta was made from unsalted dough. Hence the difference in cooking methods. As per Wikipedia: Unlike many Western noodles and pastas, Chinese noodles made from wheat flour are usually made from salted dough and therefore do not require the addition of salt ...


6

I hate to be a party pooper but no, it generally doesn't work right to use pasta in a baked dish without boiling first. Even just made fresh pasta needs a quick bath in boiling water. That's because cooking the pasta is about more than just making it tender, it's about hydrating and plumping each grain of flour. Even if your sauce is very wet, you're not ...


6

Do you like your noodles swimming in water? If not, drain them.


6

All noodles are pasta, all pastas are not noodles. For instance couscous is pasta, but it bears no resemblance to a noodle. Most pasta is made of wheat flour, but not all. Even if it's made of rice or some other grain, it's still pasta, but it might not be a noodle.


6

Baking turns bicarbonate of soda into a weak form of lye - sodium carbonate, as you said. It basically makes it a stronger alkali. The actual baking process is safe, but the resulting lye is an irritant and you should avoid getting in on your skin, and definitely avoid it getting it in your eyes. The difference in texture and colour is noticeable after ...


6

It is Thai. Pad thai has its origin from chinese noodle. It can be found every where even outside tourist area. Actually you can find it anywhere in the country. It is definitely not a new dish recently discovered. According to wikipedia it has been introduced since Ayutthaya period (about 300 years ago). It is different from original chinese noodle style ...


6

The "do not reheat" is standard text on food that's already cooked (like these noodles) with the expectation you'll cook it again. So they expect you to reheat once by stir-frying, then not again. You don't need to heat them before adding to a wok, but that's not what they're referring to. The reasoning is usually about total time at temperatures ideal for ...


6

Fresh - as opposed to dried. Specifically in the UK, 'noodles' can only be Chinese/South-East Asian. Pasta is pasta, it is never called noodles over here, so we don't have the confusion the US has with the term.* Fresh noodles you can find in the supermarket, usually refrigerated slightly, in with the 'delicate veg' section - near mangetout, pak choi, ...


6

There are two main differences, obviously: five degrees, and no boiling action. As Cascabel mentioned in a comment, dried pasta will "cook" even in water that's well below boiling temperature. However, a rolling boil serves to constantly stir the contents of the pot, much more than convection in heating water would. Without that mechanical action, ...


6

The point of stock is to extract the maximum flavor from whatever you are using, be it bones or vegetables. Once extracted there's not a whole left, which is why you don't boil stock bones over and over. Vegetables will not have much left to give after being used for stock, you can still eat them but they may not be flavorful or nutritious. Unless you're ...


6

80% potassium carbonate, 20% sodium bicarbonate at some concentration https://omnivorescookbook.com/kansui is likely to behave very differently than your sodium hydroxide. Kansui is probably strongly buffered, while your pH is likely to wander. That sort of thing is liable to wreck recipes. I'd find a good how-to online, and make the stuff right.


5

I make lasagna without boiling the noodles all the time! I have also made other noodle casseroles without first cooking the noodles. If your sauce is "wet" enough or if you add a little extra water to your sauce, it cooks fine! Most of the dishes I make, bake for about an hour and that is plenty for plumped up noodles with the same texture as boiled ahead. I ...


5

If you make fresh pasta like we do in Italy you can't cook it al dente - it is already too soft. I don't know who invented the term, but it just a guideline for how much you should cook dried pasta when re-heating it so that you do not boil it to pieces. People who make their own fresh pasta will never be eating pasta al dente.


5

For ramen, udon, and soba, it is not uncommon for Japanese restaurants to use multiple broths for layered flavors. My friend is from Yamagata in Japan and several of her favorite Udon places will make a sturdy broth with dashi as well as pork and chicken stocks. When I make noodles at home, I almost always start with dashi and fortify with chicken or pork ...


5

I do it all the time, but I always use whole wheat spaghetti. Regular spaghetti is too mushy for Lo Mein. Also, in a regular grocery store Lo Mein is about $4 for half a pound whereas spaghetti is about $1 for a pound.


5

While the other answers seem to have focused on the eggs, the biggest difference between Italian noodles and many Asian noodles (especially wheat-based noodles, like lo mein) is that the latter are often treated with alkalies like lye-water or alkali salts (potassium/sodium carbonate or sodium bicarbonate). This can enhance any preexisting yellow pigments ...


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