8

I don't think I've ever seen peanut butter grow mold, natural or commercial, refrigerated or not. What will happen with natural peanut butter is that the fat (of which there's plenty) will go rancid over time. The oxidation process that leads to rancidity requires heat, light, and usually oxygen; keeping it in the refrigerator will therefore slow the ...


7

I'm a professional baker and my daughter is allergic to peanuts and peanut anything is my husband's favorite, so we have had to learn to adjust. I use soy nut butter. It doesn't contain any peanuts or tree nuts or even sesame so it's safe for most allergy sufferers (except soy). To me it tastes more like real peanut butter than sunflower seed butter. The ...


7

The only one that could feasibly handle it would be the grinder. However, in the manual http://www.kitchenaid.com/assets/pdfs/product/ZUSECARE/FGA_Use%20and%20Care_EN.pdf on page 5 it states "Note: Very hard, dense foods such as totally dried homemade bread should not be ground in the Food Grinder. Homemade bread should be ground fresh and then oven or air-...


6

I am answering my own question with information I have gathered after doing some of my own research. Several hand mills claim to make peanut butter, but the mill that seems to have the best public following and reviews for flour making, the Country Living Grain Mill, does not claim to make peanut butter in their marketing literature. I contacted the ...


5

Sunflower seed butter (also called "sunflower butter") is nut-free, and we use it on sandwiches for a friend with a peanut allergy. Its consistency is essentially identical to peanut butter (it sticks well to bread). The biggest issue is that the flavor is somewhat different, although that varies somewhat from brand to brand (one brand, which I ...


5

Sunflower oil turns green in the presence of bases, such as baking soda. Most tap water in the US is alkaline with a pH value around 8, so that could also turn the sunflower oil green.


4

I've made peanut butter cookies with various "all natural" peanut butters, containing no extra oil/fat, just peanuts and possibly salt. They didn't split. I suppose the recipe you're looking at could be somehow different but it seems really unlikely. I haven't even seen splitting in cooked sauces using these kinds of peanut butter, along with plenty of other ...


3

There usually is no good way to do this, since most home appliances in an average kitchen are simply not suited for making nut butters. If you really want to do it, the preferable tool would be a masticating juicer. It is an expensive thing which also uses up quite a lot of counter space, and the process is messy. All other electric tools you can misuse -...


3

These are not hand grinders, but you can try a "wet grinder", but they are very slow (takes hours to make a few jars). If you don't mind ordering from a Chinese factory (assuming the freight is not exorbitant), you can view some real Peanut Butter machines here: http://www.guoxinmachine.cn/search/product?_csrf_token_=16h2n36xl7_jw&IndexArea=product_en&...


3

Most dehydrating is about using as little heat as possible to dry the air out without cooking the food. On dry, sunny days, you can use the sun on a dark surface as a heat source. Dark surfaces will absorb heat from the sun, heating the air which will lower the relative humidity and and warm the nuts which will 'mobilize' the water in the nuts so the air ...


3

I use a Cuisinart food processor to make almond butter. I once used a processor that was not very powerful and it burnt out (my brothers, so I had to replace it). You'll need a machine with significant wattage because it takes a bit of energy to grind up almonds unless you are making a very small quantity. Sorry, I don't think there is a way around that. The ...


3

I can understand that grinding nuts into butter without the use of electricity has it's ecological, and other merits, but after having made many batches of peanut butter with a Champion Juicer, I can attest that it takes a pretty powerful engine (or arm ) with plenty of endurance to get a good consistency and a generous quantity. The cleaning of any grinder ...


2

Peanut butters that are not "all natural" include cheaper oils along with sugar and emulsifiers to keep the mixture from separating and to make it lighter and smoother. That lack of emulsifiers could make a huge difference but it depends a lot on the recipe. In a normal cookie dough fat is creamed with sugar and eggs are beaten in one at a time which adds ...


2

Call the company directly and ask. I do that with all my foods (I live without a refeigerator). I met people who never refrigerate mayonaisse and lived to tell. Turns out you don't need to if you don't introduce any other food particles into it! Now I never refrigerate mayo, or many other foods and condiments. So it pays to call the company and insist on the ...


2

You will have to use a blender, grinding produces nut flour, not nut butter. You normally start from whole nuts, but now you have some preground ones, they should work too. Be aware that most blenders don't have the power to produce nut butters. If you have a high-powered blender, it is still a hassle, because it is too thick. You have to use enough nuts ...


2

You don't want to remove all the moisture, but you do need to remove quite a bit. Too much moisture can actually cause a nut butter to seize up and become very thick, similar to adding water to melted chocolate. You could roast the nuts either in the oven or in oil before grinding. This will remove moisture much faster.


2

If you don't dehydrate the nuts, you'llend up with water and nut oil in your nut butter. This is a bad combination since it is likely to make your nut butter get mouldy very quickly.


2

There are a few recipes for nut butters on the Internet, which use a food processor. They recommend using raw, unsalted nuts, without skins. Begin by lightly roasting the nuts, then, placing them in the food processor while still warm. In bursts, begin to grind the nuts. While you stated that you didn't want to add anything, it might actually be ...


2

Use a small mortar and pestle, so you're not dependent on electric outlets, batteries or such. With this small amount, the required manual effort is very low, and you can use a very small mortar and pestle, so you can pack light. Also, you can soak the almonds in the mortar itself. And it is also possible to add other ingredients directly to the mortar after ...


2

I don't have any ideas on truly fixing this batch, but I think I know what the problem is. I think you over-processed it and blitzed it into a paste. It should be a little more coarsely ground, probably only about 30s in the blender or food processor, otherwise everything releases too much oil. In order to achieve this consistency quickly, pre-crush or ...


2

Having recently made peanut butter by hand, (Using an hand cranked food processor). I can say after looking at the result, over the last few weeks. My peanut butter is much more oily than store bought. It has also separated more. The only trick to making your own peanut butter is the process it more than you thought. When you think you are done, keep going....


2

what causes the bacteria growth (is it caused by the water/moisture level) ? Each of these foods on their own are preserved by having too little moisture for bacteria or molds to live in. So in your specific case, it was likely the water which made it hospitable for them again, yes. If you have a food which supports bacterial growth, you cannot make it ...


1

You put it in a sterilised jar but it doesn't sound like you even pasteurised it before it went in (or presumably use sterilised tools). So that's probably how it got contaminated; trace levels of mould spores are everywhere. Even if you did pasteurise it you should worry about botulism (see many questions/answers here). Personally I'd try making a small ...


1

Have you tried a battery operated pepper or coffee grinder? That must exist I would guess. The only issue might be you will be using soaked wet almonds so you will need a powerful motor.


1

The difference may be in how finely the peanuts are ground. Depending on the stores machine, you may not be getting a perfectly smooth peanut butter which means there is still some residual oil in there. Also, a week after fresh-ground is still very fresh. That jar of xyz brand on the shelf can be six months or older. If you leave your fresh ground out ...


1

I suspect the textural change you experienced is analogous to the seizing of chocolate (which is also a ground, fatty seed--in that aspect similar to a sunflower seed). Sunflower seeds are fairly dry. The consist mostly of fat, and starches, and protein. When you add a small amount of water (from the mashed up banana), the starches in the sunflower ...


1

I agree that any oil in containers exposed to high alkaline value will develop a green residue. My vegetable oil container is stainless steel and kept in a cool dry cabinet. It is wiped clean of drips each use and after some time a green tinge will appear on the hinge where tap water has rested. Clean with a very dry rough cloth at room temperature often. It ...


1

WOO HOO!The answer is yes. Having read a number of homemade peanut butter posts, and coming to the conclusion that no one was brave enough to take a chance ruining their mixer or attachment, I took it on myself to try it with the meat grinder. I used the small plate. What came out in just seconds, looked like spaghetti. On closer inspection it is just ...


1

High torque and continuous duty motors definitely help, so you won't burn out your grinder. Also be sure to look at how much it can hold; if it's too small you'll have to do a lot of batches. I have been using a Bamix immersion grinder for over 10 years and wore out 2 grinding attachments. It will make creamy or coarse nut butter, depending on how much you ...


1

I found a review of the Wonder Junior done by these two fellows on youtube who are an authority on grain mills and suchlike. They have a video where they grind peanut butter with the stainless steel burrs, and it seems like it was both easy and that they got a lot of peanut butter...and best of all they didn't have to ad any oil or anything, which is why I ...


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