6

No, neither caramelization (which is the same as pyrolysis in this context), nor the Maillard reaction increase the sugar content of onions. They actually decrease it a bit. Caramelization/pyrolisis starts out with a sugar and ends with something that is not sugar. Maillard starts with a sugar and amino acids, and ends up with something that is no longer ...


6

This is a rather general question, and I will try to answer it in a general manner. First, the total amount of carbohydrates will not change, or maybe there will be a neglible reduction due to things like burning tiny bits of surface carbohydrates to carbon, or cleaning the vegetables. Second, the ratio of all carbohydrates to everything else can easily ...


5

Addressing the food chemistry aspect: Vinegar (acetic acid) reacts with calcium carbonate in the eggshells to make calcium acetate (Wikipedia), as in the naked egg experiment. Calcium acetate can be used, among other things, to gel alcohol; in food it can be used to coagulate tofu as well as having a stabilising effect. There's a chance it will act as a ...


5

While rumtscho's answer is literally correct, the word "caramelization" when applied to onions includes lots of things other than literal caramelization. Yes, actual chemical caramelization turns sugars into other things (including some flavorful components). Similarly, Maillard reactions will convert sugars and other components together into flavorful ...


4

In the UK, the nutition information (for tinned fish) is given after draining: Tesco sardines. This is specified on the packaging. How well drained is another matter, but there's enough information on the packaging - the drained weight is given as 84g while the contents is 120g, so to achieve the stated nutrition values, you'd need to drain off 36g of oil. ...


3

(google is your friend) About 35 mg of caffeine in 1 gram of matcha.


2

This shows that 1 cup of cooked brown rice contains 80mg of magnesium. and white rice contains 50mg. The wikipedia for brown rice show that for 100g of raw rice it contains 143mg of magnesium, and for white rice it's about 127mg. The wikipedia page for calrose rice does not display nutritional information. I would imagine it is similar to regular white rice ...


2

on the "Less important, but of keen interest" question: let's talk carbs instead of cals here. cals are potential chemical energy stored in carbohydrates, fats, proteins, etc. in vegetable fermentation, the fat and protein content is not a significant contributor to potential calories, so i'll confine this to carbohydrates microbial fermenters' (...


2

The answer to this is sort-of. There are a range of different forms of sugars that are involved here. Tap roots like those found in the carrot are a form of storage of energy for the plant. When growing the plant generates simple sugars such as glucose and fructose via a process known as photosynthesis. These sugars are readily transportable and ...


2

If you made soy milk in a soy milk maker, the okara isn’t raw, it’s cooked. But if you made it in a blender before boiling the beans, and then cooked the milk on the stovetop, then the okara really needs to be cooked before eating.


1

Nutritional values are based on Servings, not on the whole product, so it is realistic to assume that the values are based on what is actually to be consumed. As for the second part of your question, I would refer you to this site that simplifies FDA labeling and nutrition requirements: https://www.foodpackaginglabels.net/food-labeling-requirements/


1

In Utah sometimes in elementary school teachers encourage students to bring stones for a soup. The teacher then shows the children how to identify what kinds they brought and adds all the stones that have a high mineral content. The result is a drink which is warm and tastes more like the water you get from the mountain springs and the teacher explains that ...


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