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24

Yes, nuts are very fatty, and they will eventually go rancid— if this is the case, they will taste very poor. They can also dry out, or in more rare cases (especially if stored improperly) be infested with insects or molds. Generally, they should be good for six months to a year at their best flavor, depending on the variety (in the shell). Five ...


19

I've always heard the "meat" of the nut, or "nutmeat". Alternate terms include "kernel" or "seed" or, well, "nut". If you were to ask a botanist, the edible part is the embryo and the endosperm, though it varies depending on which type of seed you're referring to. Also, for a few seeds—not sure if any of them are called nuts—we eat the seed coat as well (e....


16

While using a pan on the stove top can result in roasted hazelnuts (or any nut), it does require constant movement and attention. It can be quick, but it can also go wrong quickly if your heat is too high...or you stop shaking the pan for too long. Alternately, roasting in a 325 to 350 F (163 to 177 C) oven, on a sheet pan, in a single layer, results in ...


14

Don't eat it as-is. It contains cyanide. Bitter almonds are the definitely poisonous thing you've probably heard of; they contain enough cyanide that just a few could kill a small child (according to On Food and Cooking). The poison is released when the kernels are broken, as defensive mechanism. The variety we eat is a "sweet" safe version which doesn't ...


13

It is possible for mold to form on cashews - or any other nuts - but only if there has been moisture penetration into the container. If the moisture is at a safe (low) level, then mold won't grow. See for example, Mycology and spoilage of retail cashew nuts, which refers to the maximum acceptable moisture content of 5.8% for retail storage/shipping, ...


13

An oven is the way to go. Toasting on a frying pan is a pain because you have to stand there shaking it for so long and it is far to easy to scorch if you pause. I have seen some recipes call for low oven temps but I use 350F (175C) for 10 to 15 minutes stirring a few times. Some sources online recommend as low as 5 minutes but I personally have not ever ...


13

That is a buckeye, fruit of Aesculus glabra, also known as the Ohio buckeye tree. The seeds (the "buckeye" part) look sort of like a horse chestnut, but the fruit is different. Do not eat it! The fruits contain tannic acid, and are poisonous to cattle, and humans, as is the foliage. (Wikipedia) (You can, however, make buckeye candy: peanut butter balls ...


12

Beyond obvious downsides like a rancid taste or textural deterioration, both tree nuts and peanuts are in a category of foods particularly prone to molds that produce aflatoxin, which can cause liver failure or liver damage in sufficient quantities. When I was importing a product from Asia that contained peanuts, it was one of the things that was considered ...


10

No, peanuts are not nuts in the botanical sense. They are legumes, much like peas or beans. Chestnuts and acorns are examples of true nuts. Most of what we commonly refer to as nuts are botanically drupes, including walnuts, almonds and cherries, as well as some larger fruits like peaches (which are typically eaten for their flesh, rather than their seed)....


9

You can eat the fruit of the cashew off of the tree, called the "cashew apple" and it is supposed to be popular in places where it grows and has a mild sweet flavor, but it's never seen anywhere else because it's very soft and doesn't transport at all. In places where they grow, they are purportedly a popular as juice and an ingredient in smoothies in ...


9

Even easier method - Bring a pot of water to a boil. Pour the nuts into a strainer and hold over the steam shaking the contents occasionally to get moisture spread throughout the mixture. Remove from steam. Spread the nuts out on a plate and sprinkle with salt or other seasoning


9

This is a basic fact of food safety. It doesn't matter how long each of the ingredients take to go bad separately. Prepared food will go bad soon unless you do something special to preserve it. In your case, you had hazelnuts, which don't go bad because 1) they have too little water, and 2) bacteria cannot enter their tissue, which is made of intact cell ...


9

Step 1 should always be to ask which ingredients exactly you need to stay clear of, just in case it's more than nuts. My - possibly naïve - assumption would be that basic recipes that stick to flour, sugar, eggs, butter and possibly dairy should probably be ok. Chocolate could be dangerous as the factories often use nuts as well, so there is a risk of ...


9

I just looked at 10 different recipes for caramelized nuts, and of those 10, not a single one called for oil. That being the case, I think you're fine skipping the oil. If it doesn't seem liquid enough, warm it up before pouring. If you try it, be sure to come back and let us know how it goes!


8

The natural colors for pistacio meats are green, yellow-green, purple and/or red. Shells are beige. The Kerman variety, which account for 90% of the pistachios grown in California, are yellow-green to deep green. Pistacios from Iran tend to be more in the red-purple spectrum, and are alleged by their partisans to be superior to California pistacios. ...


8

Nutella is over half sugar by weight; peanut butter might be more like 5-10% depending on brand/style. That already sounds like enough that it won't make a good one-for-one substitution in most things, especially anything that's not already pretty sweet. It probably also means that it'll have a slightly different resulting texture; nutella is already a bit ...


8

No one device, manual or electric, is ideal for all of the tasks that you have enumerated. Many cooks will have more than one tool, depending on the job at hand. Some spices, particularly cinnamon, are very difficult to grind effectively at home without leaving fibrous bits that may give an unpleasant mouth feel. Of course, when infusing flavor from a ...


8

I'm not sure what causes it and what food safety issues may be involved but I used to have a walnut tree and got a few from time to time that looked like that. I had a small taste once and they were really bad, not worth keeping. I'd put it down to some sort of rot and I live in Tasmania with a relatively similar climate. Looking for a reference on common ...


7

I really didn't want to roast the nuts, however, the cashews I purchased were not salted at all and tasted very plain and were too expensive to throw away. I tried shaking salt onto them, however, it did not stick so I tried the following and was very pleased with the results. Place about 18oz of cashews in a bowl, add a small amount of oil (vegetable or ...


7

The traditional Greek way of roasting pistachios--preferably the delicious and uniquely flavored pistachios from the island of Aegina--is to soak them in a brine where some citric acid (or lemon juice) has been added. In a large bowl I add a pound of pistachios, a cup of water, two teaspoons of salt and one teaspoon of citric acid. Over the course of a day, ...


7

Edit: I see the poster speaks to this. Non-the-less, I'm going to leave this as an answer to the title question. Cashews are pretty oily nuts and stored under less than ideal conditions can go rancid. A few months in a warmer than room temperature environment will do it. Keep them cool and they are very durable. I speak from bitter experience. The smell ...


7

According to the Mayo Clinic, hazelnuts are somewhat more fatty than almonds, per ounce by weight (the range is for whether they are roasted or not): Almonds - 14 - 15 g Hazelnuts - 17 - 17.7 g As might be expected, hazelnuts are slightly lower in starch. These is unlikely to make any practical difference in the recipe, as both are fairly close. You ...


7

I believe the fat in your cashews is becoming rancid. That would most likely be caused by oxidation. Exposure to air is the chief culprit. However, exposure to light or heat could also accelerate this. I'd wager you got a jar of nuts that wasn't quite sealed. Have you had this problem before with other jars of these nuts? 1-2 weeks is an abnormally short ...


7

I made bacon😃 Mixed together 2 tablespoons oil, 3 tbs soy sauce or tamari, 2 tbs nutritional yeast, 1 tbs woostershire, 1/2 tbs maple syrup, 3/4 tbs hot paprika in a bowl. Mix in 3 cups loose Almond skins. Bake 375 for approx 20 minutes on non stick surface until crispy. BLT waiting to happen. Or use as bacon bits on salad...


7

Nope, no problem with that at all. Toast away!


6

My recent experience with nut-toasting gave a temperature and time recommendation with the following added advice: " . . . until fragrant" That made a world of difference because in my case (almonds), it took several minutes longer than the stated time and it was definitely worth the wait. The cookies made from the toasted almonds were voted best of the ...


6

Looks like roasted chickpeas which are actually a legume (related to peas & beans), but you can toast them up and eat like nuts (like you would peanuts/groundnuts which are also legumes).


6

Depends on exactly how sensitive the allergic person is, but there is some protein/allergen transfer. So there is an allergy risk. (Depends on the particular person whether it'll cause harm or not—but there are reported cases where it has). To avoid transfer, you need to thoroughly clean out the fryer/pan/etc. and use fresh shortening. See, for example, ...


6

You can absolutely skip this step in your recipe and have quality results. Typically, a recipe for roasting nuts would include oil to enhance texture or flavour, and to provide a more even coating for any additional spices to catch onto the nut. With that said, nuts are usually oily on their own so you don't need to add more -- it's just going to make the ...


6

A chopping jar: (photo from Etsy) should be exactly what you need. (You may also want to look at multi-blade mezzalunas, but they're really meant for mincing herbs.)


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