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1

Your father is probably confusing the process of making margarine from saturated fats with the process of hydrogenating fats, which used to be the primary way we got saturated fats for making margarine. The two are completely separate though. Margarine is made by emulsifying a mix of saturated and unsaturated fats with a small amount of water in what ...


1

I'm pretty sure that I'll is not part of the Maillard reaction, which by definition happens between proteins and carbohydrates. But remember, browning is much more than only a Maillard reaction. I can confirm your observation that oil creates a better texture on roasted vegetables, and if I had to guess, I would say that it turns the roasting process ...


10

The Malliard reaction is quite complex. The article I linked defines it as many small, simultaneous chemical reactions that occur when proteins and sugars in and on your food are transformed by heat, producing new flavors, aromas, and colors. Oil does not necessarily need to be present, though, especially with regard to meats, fat is often there. If ...


3

Butter, specifically the milk components (sugars and proteins), turns brown and flavorful when cooked. Clarified butter doesn't have nearly the same effect. Fat on vegetables also slows evaporation while roasting, leaving more moisture in them. Oils will also get hotter, than evaporating water, which allows the vegetables brown more. A little bit of pure ...


5

Eggs are about 10% fat by weight, a large egg is about 50g, so you would lose 5g of fat in the recipe per egg, which is just over a teaspoon of oil. Whether or not you add it depends on what you want out of the recipe. If you are taking eggs out to reduce fat then you don't need to add anything, if you want to keep the richness and consistency then a splash ...


1

There are instant read thermometers, and there are also some that use a laser and you can point them at a surface and it reads the temperature that way. If you are really doing "deep" frying like at least an inch or two of oil there should be enough so that you can use a regular thermometer. I have a "fry daddy" type fryer and it has a thermometer built in....


2

My meat thermometer can bear temperatures above deep frying ones so I just use that and I keep the tip "suspended" in the oil with the help of the pot's handle and the thermometer's own cable. An alarm at 170 Celsius helped me last time to keep the temp under control. For the record, I was frying this https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Struffoli Since I don'...


1

I don't see a safety risk. Oil can go rancid. That is a quality issue, rather than a safety issue. Moist sugar could potentially mold, I suppose. If you see mold forming I would discard. Otherwise, this seems like a low risk situation to me.


1

here on the wiki you can find table of cooking oils and their usage purposes:


-1

Plain oil painter's turpentine does the trick. Thins the oil, dissolves residue...discard excess liquid oil, apply turps with an old bristle type paint brush. Thick caked-on gunk (like an abused deep fryer) may take a couple of applications or soaking but unlikely to have to wait "overnight". Turps isn't gritty and gets in the finest cracks to displace ...


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