99

TL;DR: heating the pan before the oil has no useful effects in most cases. While this is a duplicate of another question, I'm going to answer it again because that question's accepted answer provides zero evidence or citations to back itself up. Which is important, because the accepted answer is wrong. The popular myth is "Cold oil in hot pan and food won'...


46

Do nothing, or maybe give them a soap wash. You seem to be very worried about what are very small effects. Sure, the oil can oxidize over time. It won't turn your utensils into a big ball of funk. You probably won't notice that much difference in reality. Maybe, if you hold them under your nose, the whiff will be different than if you hadn't used olive oil....


42

That oils' smoke points can be generically classified solely according to their type is a myth. Robert Wolke, a professor emeritus of chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh and food columnist for the Washington Post, claims that the smoke point for an oil varies widely depending on origin and refinement. While the smoke point does generally increase ...


22

I don't want to disappoint you, but the sad truth is that extra virgin olive oil is unsuitable for all the cooking methods you mention. When you heat any oil past its smoking point it starts to deteriorate and can even become dangerous. Olive oil, extra virgin in particular, has a lower smoking point than most other oils. In fact, you will be better off with ...


22

You're heating the oil past its smoke point. There is no trick or technique that will prevent oil from smoking and oxidizing ("burning") at temperatures above the smoke point. It is literally being slowly destroyed at that temperature. I honestly don't know why TV chefs are so attached to the idea of cooking with olive oil when most serious attempts to ...


19

How liquid was it when you say liquid? Our kitchen is very cold in winter and may very well get to fridge temperature at night time and the olive oil gets white balls of solidified oil in it, and then goes very sludgy, making it difficult to pour, if not impossible. But it doesn't exactly solidify. So it depends on whether you mean it is completely liquid ...


16

There are three major properties an edible fat (I am assuming you are not asking about inedible oils like petroleum based products) has that affect how it is best used: Flavor Saturation Smoke point Properties Flavor The flavor of the fat is very important. So called neutral oils (like canola oil or refined grapeseed oil, or refined peanut oil, among ...


15

Regarding the (mis)conception that heating the pan will close its microfissures so micropieces of food will not fall into the small holes sticking to them: wrong. Check the response to the more general problem of thermal expansion of a solid with a hole https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/12599/will-a-hole-cut-into-a-metal-disk-expand-or-shrink-when-...


14

For an astringent/bitter twist to the flavour, for a scent, and the visual gloss effect ** Mediterranean people have been doing this for centuries For best effect they are probably using a first cold press oil (Extra-virgin) from young olive trees (less than 50 years old). It is often quite green in colour and has a pungent and astringent odour These are ...


14

Indian food is commonly cooked with ghee (clarified butter), for both religious and flavor reasons. Where ghee is not used, coconut or refined palm oil are common. I can also tell you from experience that Indian food can be made with unflavored vegetable oils (canola, sunflower or soy), without a deleterious effect on flavor or texture.


14

I agree that fermentation from bacteria is the most likely explanation. So, to tackle your questions point by point: It is unsafe, as the other posts already mentioned, due to botulism danger. Plant matter without access to oxygen is not shelf stable, unless it has been pickled with sufficient acid. There will be some chemistry going on between garlic and ...


13

Olive oil degrades over time so freshness is important. Some of the higher priced olive oils sit on shelves for a very long time and by time they are sold they can be of lower quality than some mass produced olive oils. I'd say you're in the right frame of mind and would recommend finding a brand with a local representative who can trust and know the ...


13

Olive oil has a notoriously low smoke point. If you're looking for something nutritious to pop corn with, try avocado oil. While burned food tastes yucky, and there is (some) evidence that a steady diet consisting mainly of burnt olive oil may be (slightly) carcinogenic, it is highly unlikely you did anything worse than ruin your munchies.


13

Nothing else is going to taste like extra-virgin olive oil, but extra-virgin isn't necessary for cooking at all. As a matter of fact, the smoke point of extra-virgin olive oil is so low that it's not often used for cooking. For cooking with olive oil, usually the choice would be "refined" or "pure" olive oil. Honestly, those don't taste like much. So ...


12

The grades of olive oil actually depend on the particular legislation of the country you live in. In Europe it is regulated by directive 136/66/CEE, reg. CE 2568/91 and reg.CE 1989/03 (PDF). The denomination depends on the acidity of the oil. Although the law does not specify it, you also have another characterization, based on the number of "pressings" ...


12

A vinaigrette is not a stable emulsion so it will eventually separate- however it will stay together long enough for the salad to be immediately served and eaten. I find that pouring the oil and acid separately creates a salad with a mouthful of olive oil coating the leaves and pool of vinegar at the bottom of the plate. It's true that the oil in a ...


11

Well, this is a common confusion between "sour" and "bitter". The better your olive oil is, the lower its acid value - extra virgin olive oil has the lowest acid value, it is pressed in ways that reduce contact with atmospheric oxygen. Contact with oxygen increases the acid value of olive oil. Whizzing olive oil in a blender aerates it, and the resultant ...


11

In terms of sautéing, the simple answer is that using oil is going to let you develop fond, i.e. the tasty brown stuff, on your veggies whereas cooking only with water will essentially boil/steam your vegetables — and perhaps give them a little char, as well. In cooking, both oil and water are basically just things you use to transfer heat to food. They are ...


11

Olive oil bottles are not sealed for health reasons. I.e., olive oil is not processed through a sterile heat canning process. The two primary reasons for sealing the bottles are to prevent leaks and to make them tamper proof. The type of top in your picture is a 'Ropp Top'. It features a ring below the cap that will separate from the top when you open the ...


11

Recipes often call for a warm up for a reason similar to preheating an oven. The recipe author has no idea how heavy you pan is. What the author does know is that for just about any hot pan, 2Tbs olive oil will heat within a few seconds, where you can saute or whatever for a specified duration.


10

No. Steak needs be seared at a high, high temperature. Not only would extra virgin olive oil lose everything that makes it special at such a high temperature (so not worth the expense anyway), it would also burn. The smoke point of EVOO is 350F, 180C (give or take). That's simply way too low for searing steak. There is no such thing as a cooking oil that's ...


10

You can substitute vegetable oil for olive oil, that is no problem. You won't have the flavor that olive oil brings to the party, but in the case of more refined (not extra virgin) olive oils, it really won't make much difference. Just use however much oil the recipe calls for. It'll be fine.


10

My comment on the other answer got too long. Couple of points: Regarding the "controversial" status of smoke points: I don't think it's that controversial. Chemically extracted and altered olive oils (pomace and "light" variants) behave differently to pressed, "real" olive oil. Few people include the first when talking about extra virgin; which has a sub-...


10

I see no problem with your plans. You will - obviously - get a somewhat different taste, depending on which type of sunflower oil you use. For the refined, basically tasteless oil, the pesto might be a bit blander and the taste of your other ingredients more pronounced. If you are using a cold-pressed unfiltered oil, you'll get the nutty undertones of the ...


10

Really no need. These are salad servers. Salad has dressing. Dressing contains olive oil. Relax!


9

There's nothing magical about garlic that causes it to be especially prone to botulism - it's just commonly found as an example because it's commonly used to prepare flavoured oils. All low-acid foods must be acidified or pressure-canned before long-term storage. Storage in oil creates an anaerobic environment which further promotes botulism, and room-...


9

I would throw it away quickly. Making garlic oil is a huge risk for botulism (botulism is a bacteria that thrives in food when there's a lack of oxygen, as is the case with garlic submerged in olive oil). You CAN make garlic-infused olive oil, but it's best to keep it in the fridge to prevent the botulism from growing. They say that it's difficult to tell ...


9

This is a basic fact of food safety. It doesn't matter how long each of the ingredients take to go bad separately. Prepared food will go bad soon unless you do something special to preserve it. In your case, you had hazelnuts, which don't go bad because 1) they have too little water, and 2) bacteria cannot enter their tissue, which is made of intact cell ...


9

No, it is not safe anymore. The scombridae family of fish (mackerels, tunas, bonitos) decay in a way that does not necessarily cause a bad smell, as the bacteria just convert amino acids of the fish into a harmful version. The bacteria that does this is unfortunately facultative anaerobic, which means it prefers oxygen, but will do without, too. So, the ...


9

Rancid oil is generally still safe, it just has a bad taste, so from a safety standpoint your utensils are fine as-is. From a taste consideration, the oil must 1) go rancid, and then 2) have flavor molecules transferred from the utensils to your food...in large enough quantity to actually change the taste. Since usually only the outside surface of your ...


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