100

TL;DR: heating the pan before the oil has no useful effects in most cases. While this is a duplicate of another question, I'm going to answer it again because that question's accepted answer provides zero evidence or citations to back itself up. Which is important, because the accepted answer is wrong. The popular myth is "Cold oil in hot pan and food won'...


46

Do nothing, or maybe give them a soap wash. You seem to be very worried about what are very small effects. Sure, the oil can oxidize over time. It won't turn your utensils into a big ball of funk. You probably won't notice that much difference in reality. Maybe, if you hold them under your nose, the whiff will be different than if you hadn't used olive oil....


15

Regarding the (mis)conception that heating the pan will close its microfissures so micropieces of food will not fall into the small holes sticking to them: wrong. Check the response to the more general problem of thermal expansion of a solid with a hole https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/12599/will-a-hole-cut-into-a-metal-disk-expand-or-shrink-when-...


11

Recipes often call for a warm up for a reason similar to preheating an oven. The recipe author has no idea how heavy you pan is. What the author does know is that for just about any hot pan, 2Tbs olive oil will heat within a few seconds, where you can saute or whatever for a specified duration.


10

Really no need. These are salad servers. Salad has dressing. Dressing contains olive oil. Relax!


9

Rancid oil is generally still safe, it just has a bad taste, so from a safety standpoint your utensils are fine as-is. From a taste consideration, the oil must 1) go rancid, and then 2) have flavor molecules transferred from the utensils to your food...in large enough quantity to actually change the taste. Since usually only the outside surface of your ...


8

Hot water & soap won't damage the wood so long as you don't leave it in the water long term -- clean it, rinse off, then dry it. (some recommend towel drying it, as it might warp if there's still too much water on it when air drying) Salt scrubs with vinegar or lemon juice are fine, too ... so long as you rinse and dry it after. I can't speak to ...


6

You can use any type of chili depending on how spicy you want the oil to be. You could use ghost peppers to burn the insides of your mouth, or perhaps use Jalapeno for a more milder heat. You can use the Scolville Scale to decide which pepper to use. At the end of the day it comes down to your personal preference.


4

You have a couple of potential issues, one possibly dangerous, the other has to do with flavor/quality control. First, by not washing your cooking vessel, you leave the potential for bacterial growth. This would be especially true if there is some down time (even a couple of hours) between uses. The quality issue is that over time residual oil is going to ...


4

Samin Nosrat writes in her book Salt Fat Acid Heat: Preheat the pan to reduce the amount of time fat spends in direct contact with the hot metal, minimizing opportunity for it to deteriorate. As oil is heated, it breaks down, leading to flavor degradation and the release of toxic chemicals. Food is also more likely to stick to a cold pan—another reason to ...


3

I used to make my own chilli oil (for cooking with) from home grown chillies. Made with fresh chillies it can go mouldy within a few days even in the fridge (though sometimes it lasts longer) so the first factor is use thoroughly dried chillies. I grow my own, and used to mainly grow Apache. This is a moderately hot, thin-fleshed variety, and it's ideal - ...


3

Short answer: No. Long answer: No - because the free radicals are very short lived and highly reactive - each free radical will generally only interact with one other molecule before being destroyed. This could cause degradation of reactive nutrients such as vitamins and other nutrients in the oil, but is unlikely to cause much problem with other foods (I ...


3

Warm water and dishwashing soap is good first step that almost can't hurt. Use it generously and you will take out a lot of olive oil from your wood. Don't scrub, just wash, and be generous with rinsing. Remember to dry slowly and thoroughly to avoid cracks. Mineral spirit is not food safe. Do not go that way. My solution? Wash as described above, and ...


2

From your descriptions it seems just freezing of some of the oil components. When the oil is kept at low enough T, it is naturally subjected to partial of even full freezing. White wisps, flakes and even little solid spherical drops can be seen, which tend to deposit at the bottom but are about floating in the volume if the recipient is moved. This is ...


2

I doubt about the needing of an answer as it is self-contained in the question but it seems worth a chemistry clarification. Oxidative rancidification goes indeed via radicalic pathways. In "fresh" oil, the process will be eased by, e.g., peroxides already formed in the already rancid oil that you would eventually mix. Peroxides are relatively unstable and ...


2

It sounds like you feel that 350 is too low a temperature to effectively cook fish and some other foods. In fact many of the foods that people saute in olive oil are vegetables which could also be cooked just fine on top of the stove immersed in water. By that method, the vegetables would not exceed 212°F, since the temperature of water can't go above its ...


1

The major reason I can think of for adding oil to a pan after it is hot is safety: if you are heating a pan of oil and then forget it could start a pan fire. If you add the oil only when you are ready to cook you don't have that risk. I often add the oil when I first heat the pan because I can watch the oil and I can tell when it's hot by looking at it, ...


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