9

Doubtful. The botulism risk usually arises from long term storage of garlic cloves in olive oil under anaerobic (no oxygen) conditions. You with your garlic powder are nowhere near those conditions. Cooks cook garlic in olive oil all the time, with no ill effects. Promoted to answer as requested. I was not sure where we draw the line on food safety concerns....


8

You can make a roux with any fat. Olive oil will certainly work. There are also other methods for thickening a gravy, such as the addition of cornstarch or arrowroot.


7

You can use any type of chili depending on how spicy you want the oil to be. You could use ghost peppers to burn the insides of your mouth, or perhaps use Jalapeno for a more milder heat. You can use the Scolville Scale to decide which pepper to use. At the end of the day it comes down to your personal preference.


5

Cloudy material will be fungus growing in the culture. It is not safe to eat. Where the contamination has come from is impossible to work out, there are several steps in the canning process during which a failure in the step could result in the canning not being sterile and growing something.


4

I used to make my own chilli oil (for cooking with) from home grown chillies. Made with fresh chillies it can go mouldy within a few days even in the fridge (though sometimes it lasts longer) so the first factor is use thoroughly dried chillies. I grow my own, and used to mainly grow Apache. This is a moderately hot, thin-fleshed variety, and it's ideal - ...


4

You have a couple of potential issues, one possibly dangerous, the other has to do with flavor/quality control. First, by not washing your cooking vessel, you leave the potential for bacterial growth. This would be especially true if there is some down time (even a couple of hours) between uses. The quality issue is that over time residual oil is going to ...


3

First, if you are going to use it, do so within a few days, and if you are not using right away, put in another container and store it in the refrigerator. As for uses, you can employ it anywhere you would use oil, and where the flavor works. Certainly a vinaigrette or dressing. I've seen suggestions for using it when roasting potatoes, and even on ...


3

Put it on the vegetables not on the tray. Anything not on the vegetables is wasted. You can put a little bit on them then roll them around with your hangs. Olive oil is good for roasting. Just skimp on it. You can bake with any bland oil. I used to keep corn oil for baking. It is cheap and flavorless. Sunflower oil is pretty cheap too, and it has a ...


3

With a lot of commercial oils, the industry distinguishes auto-oxidation from photo-oxidation (also called photosensitised oxidation), where the former is in the absence of the light, and the latter with light: [W]hen olive oils are exposed to light, photo-oxidation occurs through the action of natural photosensitizers (i.e. chlorophyll), which react with ...


2

Botulinum bacteria require a moist environment to germinate, reproduce, and produce botulinum toxin. Therefore, there is no risk of botulism from eating fully dried ingredients (unless they already contained botulinum toxin, which would not occur in a normal processing pipeline). It is absolutely possible to acquire a foodborne illness from uncooked dried ...


1

Just looking at it, Soy Butter is made with soy beans and canola oil or grape seed oil (or other types of vegetable oil). If not wanting to use olive oil, use good canola oil or other vegetable I never used Soy Butter, but you should try it, but I expect that the soy part of it might burn.


1

"Nowadays" means - "since the moment we learned to make clear glass and noticed how bad it is to store oil in it." Light damages oil in general. Among the many reactions it speeds up or makes possible, the most noticeable is the oil going rancid. My ex mother-in-law thought she'd gotten a great deal on bottles of olive oil in Italy. It took two days of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible