Hot answers tagged

68

Sauteing onions: Softens them, most people prefer not to run into raw onions in their sauce. Onions will cook in a sauce, but very slowly, so frying them before makes sure they will be soft even if your sauce has a fast cooking time Releases sugars, making them taste sweeter Reduces the onion's harshness Browning the onions creates flavor Sauteing garlic: ...


37

You can find out. Split your sauce into 2 batches. Add onions and garlic raw to one and sautéed to another. Some people like the sharp strong taste of those things raw. In the US that is not common. Sauteeing will mellow the taste. When I make sauce I sauté it because I hope someone else will eat it besides me. If you are not sure or you are American ...


35

If you want to be really, really picky, then the 'green' is each individual leaf as it breaks away from the cylindrical whole. That leaves you with the decision as to whether to pick off each leaf, giving you a bit of extra 'white' or just make some relatively arbitrary decision after you hit that first leaf 'node'. So, unless you want to pick off each leaf, ...


18

You can also use ‘layering’, particularly with the garlic. Garlic fried in oil at the beginning of the process contributes rich, mellow, savory flavors, but a little finely minced or shaved garlic added right near the end adds a sharper, fresher, more ‘forward’ garlic flavor. I guess you could do the same with onion, though I wouldn't add it as close to ...


17

The classic "high dining" answer is as you propose: the tender light green part gets kept with the white, while the mature part of the leaf gets removed and thrown away, or used for something different than the white part. This applies also to leeks. The practical answer is: as you like it. Not everybody follows the French culinary traditions, and ...


8

Garlic: Many of the flavors in garlic are oil-soluble, not water soluble. In fact, you can just crush garlic cloves, saute in oil, and then remove the garlic completely. The oil will taste strongly of garlic, as will the final dish. Sauteing your garlic will help these flavors be more apparent in the tomato sauce (the flavors will also be slightly ...


5

In European and Mediterranean cooking traditions, it's unusual to find raw onions added into a sauce which is cooked or served warm. As GdD alluded to, onions (and other aliums) have harsh, not-entirely-pleasant flavors and odors which become very apparent when they're warmed, and which are removed by sauteing or other dry cooking. (Think of the odor of a ...


5

It varies a lot. In Chinese cuisine, where scallions are extremely commonly used, the dark green end is used for garnish, while the lighter part and white end are usually used as an aromatic with ginger and garlic. A few examples from my favorite Chinese cooking channel, here's a recipe for scallion pancakes that cuts somewhere in the middle of the light ...


4

Oooh! This is interesting! I think the first thing I'd like to know is there a requirement for the entire bar to savory? Because a lot of foods mix flavors and textures. Salted Caramel with nuts is an easy example. I can't remember the episode but there was an interview with David Chang of Momofuku on the Splendid Table where he spoke about his grand unified ...


3

Dough. I make oatmeal cookies with so many other things in them that the dough can barely hold them together. Chips, nuts, dry fruit, coconut; all that good stuff. I can imagine that strategy here. You could do the same with your crispy onion. Make dough with butter, flour, egg and baking soda. Mix in the onions (gently! you don't want to smash them!). ...


3

Raw is punchy! Reserve some of your crushed garlic and onion mix. Mince it fine. Then add it at the end. Cooking brings out some allium flavors and attenuates others. If your figure out the raw punch is what you are looking for, experiment with the ratio of cooked to raw, or experiment with just raw onions or just raw garlic. Or you could consider ...


3

A. To make the flavor of tomatoes stronger in a sauce: start with better-tasting tomatoes. Depending on time of year these will often be canned. There are many reviews of canned tomatoes, so I'll not pass judgment here but there are some excellent ones out there. reduce the sauce more to intensify the flavor. Tomatoes are an umami flavor. Adding another ...


3

My grandmother always told us to never mix garlic and onion. She was Calabrese. I use both in some recipes. Granny was not the best cook.


2

They brown and become flavorful for two reasons, not one: Two different browning reactions are at play in the process: caramelization, in which sugars break down into hundreds of new molecules ... and the Maillard reaction, in which proteins and sugars transform into an insane number of new flavor and aroma molecules. https://www.seriouseats.com/2019/06/...


2

Follow the recipe, and failing that, always sauté first. As noted by previous commenters, sautéing accomplishes a number of things. Overall, softening is not that important, they will soften while simmering in the tomatoes. But the release of sugars is. Also the browning and flavor that comes with that (though some recipes call for sautéing only until ...


2

there's another approach altogether that has worked for me: lacto-fermented tomato sauce. only takes a week, triples the amount of dishwashing, and could easily go completely wrong, especially on the first try! same amount of raw tomatoes you're already starting with, quartered, and keep the juice! halve the amount of onions you'd normally use, because ...


2

It depends on the recipe, but most commonly I would cut across the whole bunch where the lowest clearly green part is. In your photo, that would be about 1/3 way down from the top of ???. I would call the part above the cut green and that below white. It depends somewhat on the recipe. If green color is a distraction I will cut off more greens and probably ...


1

Instead of starting with the fried onions, you might want to consider frying the onions yourself. There's a dish called an "onion loaf". (I think I first had it about 30 years ago at Buddy's Crabs & Ribs in Annapolis, MD ... it's no longer on their menu, and I have no idea how wide-spread it is) As best I can tell, it's a bunch of onion rings (...


1

It might be worth experimenting with transglutaminase RM, which is an enzyme that glues proteins together. Given the low protein content of onion, I suggest the RM formula, as it has added sodium caseinate. However, this might not be enough additional protein, and you could use extra sodium caseinate, as these folks do for their veggie burgers. I'm not ...


1

You don't need onions or mushrooms, you can make gravy from strong stock, thickened using a roux or cornstarch slurry. This only really comes out well if you can get concentrated stock, it's not really that good with stock cubes, as they aren't really stock, more of a flavored salt. My go-to gravy recipe uses Knorr stockpots, which are widely available in ...


1

more options: add more tomatoes via pre-concentrated products like tomato paste or powder when initially cooking, add some rinsed tomato stems and leaves, this should help with the "punchy" part, just be sure to remove them soon after cooking after cooking, add up to 1 tsp lemon juice per medium/large tomato. if balanced well, the lemon flavor will lift ...


1

Toss those. That does not sound normal at all. But, possibly, ask someone else to smell them as well. Cheers


1

I wonder if draining browned ground beef while it has the onion in it, also drains out some of the flavor the onion imparts. If I am using a 80/20 fat content of ground beef, I brown the onions first and then spoon them out of the pot and set them aside. Then I brown my beef, drain off excess grease then add my browned onions back into the pot. To me, it ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible