Hot answers tagged

67

Yes! I just came across this, and it just so happens I could use an orange in a slaw I'm making right now. Tablespoon Orange Hack Simply lop off the ends, make a small incision in the side and carefully open to reveal easy-to-eat orange segments. (Or as I prefer to call it, an orange caterpillar.) I did it with my orange, and I had never peeled an ...


25

How about using orange zest instead of the juice? That way you'll get a lot of the aroma and flavor we think of as "orange" without really changing the sweetness or acidity.


22

In theory, yes you can. Whether you want to is a completely different question. The segments are "peeled" by soaking them in hydrochlorid acid. Which sounds worse than it is, because the concentration is somewhere between 1% and 0.3% (sources vary). (1) Once the outer skin is dissolved, the acid is neutralized by dumping them in a lye bath (sodium hydroxide)...


19

This is fairly easy, and completely safe, to do with pectinex enzyme. ...and yes, you want to! It is how modernist chefs remove the pith from citrus. You can order Pectinex Ultra-SPL from Modernist Pantry (modernistpantry.com). See this link for the science and technique.


12

While many pictures show them deep red (perhaps for the dramatic effect?), even orange flesh wih only some red tinge is normal. Even the wikipedia link you gave in the question states: The Moro is a "deep blood orange" meaning that the flesh ranges from orange-veined with ruby coloration, to vermilion, to vivid crimson, to nearly black. The color of ...


11

The best way to remove wax from citrus is simply to wash it with dish soap under warm, running water. Don't obsess about how long you should wash the fruit; usually the wax application is very thin and quickly removed. There is no easy way to tell whether you have removed the wax, so if you return citrus to fridge after removing the wax, you might want to ...


10

You might try zesting the orange, reducing the juice a bit, and then adding the zest to the syrup and then cooking it down a bit more. You may or may not wish to strain it after letting the zest cook for a minute or so. If you do this, take care. I believe cooking it too long will make the zest overly bitter. Alternatively, you could use frozen orange ...


9

There is unlikely to be any single answer to my question since the coating can be any one of a number of substances including, Natural or synthetic resins Carnauba wax Shellac Tall oil Paraffin Oxidised polyethylene Candelilla wax Beeswax Corn, soy or milk proteins These may be disolved in a petroleum based solvent, emulsified with a detergent or modified ...


8

I just happen to cut into this literally Half Bloody Blood orange! Tasted great and so pretty!


7

First i roll it a few times on the table while pressing it gently. This loosens the skin from the meat. Then i make 4 (shallow!) incisions and peel at least 2 of them away including the top and bottom. (so let these stay attached somewhat) Since the skin is already loose, they almost fall off. All pieces stay whole. I then unroll the pieces, and voila. I do ...


7

You could always just use an Orange Peeler. It's a simple, easy-to-use tool you can find in many kitchen convenience stores. For those who can't follow the link - an orange peeler is a tool (usually orange, appropriately enough) with a hook on one end that digs into the orange peel, and a long partly-bent 'lever' at the other end. How you use it is ...


7

I've made a similar cake before - note that it uses clementines, not just any oranges. This is an advantage because their skin is thinner and less bitter than larger oranges. The cooking softens the peel enough to puree smoothly, and helps release the orange flavor from the peel. It's not really about reducing biterness; some of the bitter flavor may be ...


7

Speaking of dehydration, it is possible to dry out a piece of orange peel. If you do it properly so it does not rot or get moldy, it will last for years, although it will gradually use its aroma. The problem is that it will shrink when dehydrating, resulting in a worse-looking surface and possibly distorting the signature. A largish section is also ...


7

You have a couple of solutions: Make it thicker with agar agar instead of starch Use something like jam or marmalade The latter might be to close of the sugary paste you dislike. However agar agar contrary to starch has a really wide range of thickening. You can just make things from a tiny bit thicker than water to jelly. More over the boiling needed will ...


6

I'm from the garden/landscape section of the site, but post your question there anyway, regardless of my answer - you may get a better/different one! Navel oranges, technically, are parthenocopic, which means they produce fruit without fertilisation, and that's why they are seedless. However, if the blossom is pollinated by a suitable donor, then seeds may ...


6

The only good way I know of to concentrate fresh orange juice and maintain the flavor is by removing the water. But not by heating it, as the heat will destroy the flavor. You need a vacuum distiller or freeze dryer for your orange juice. Pulling a vacuum will boil the juice at room temperature, removing the water without adding any heat.


5

Whole fresh oranges, refrigerated, should last 1-2 months per Eat By Date. You can freeze orange peels (or any citrus) very successfully. When you have a sufficient quantity, you might choose to candy them, which should last at least several weeks if stored in a cool, dry environment, probably months if well dried as part of the candying process. You can ...


5

The skin is the outer thick orange-coloured cover; obviously as you're not told to remove it this would include the pith (the white fibrous material) as well. The pips are the seeds inside the fruit: pip noun plural noun: pips 1. a small hard seed in a fruit. synonyms: seed, stone, pit


4

First I would recommend viewing the episode of Good Eats, Orange Aid. While there is not a direct answer to your question Alton does talk about getting the maximum orange flavor as well as how to avoid the pithy flavor. (This link to Orange Aid will take you to Amazon Prime, where if you are not an Amazon Prime member you may purchase for $2.99...) The take ...


4

If you have enough time, you could make an orange extract. Just peel pieces of zest from several oranges (avoid the white pith) and soak them in vodka for a couple of weeks, then filter it. Then you could add it to the pan like wine, boiling off the alcohol (assuming you don't want alcohol in your sauce). You could also follow a homemade orange liqueur ...


3

There is an orange peeler tool that works well: But I find that using my teeth to remove the peel is easiest and least messy.


3

Yes, those are vestigial seeds. Breeding a fruit with absolutely no seeds is quite difficult if not impossible, as the whole point of fruits is to have seeds, and get those seeds distributed by animals or insects. There is almost always some remnant or reduced version of the seed. Just as a point of interest, so-called seedless fruits usually are ...


3

Having a citrus juice in iced tea certainly isn't a new concept. However, there is no official name for half orange and half iced tea drinks. So you may call it whatever you wish.


3

It is almost certainly a fermentation - opened juice does not keep for a week in the fridge. So you got some bacteria in it which are creating tangy byproducts (lactic or acetic acid). It is a method of creating fermented drinks such as cider (or even fruit wine), but without following a tested process, you cannot be sure if some of the bacteria may be ...


3

Try gently scraping with a spoon or non-serrated knife, if you want to remove more pith. However, that looks pretty good to me. Your recipe for drying has you finely chopping the peel. So, I would say that zest would be just fine as well.


2

I like serving them as half moons. I first wash them and then cut the 2 ends off. Make slices as thick or thin as you like, then stack the slices and make one slice down the middle making half circles. They are very easy to eat out of hand as you pull the slice open, all the litter segments pop up into little triangles that are very easy to eat with no ...


2

I would make it with a duck demi-glace or some simmered down duck stock, juice from a bitter orange, and perhaps a bit of Grand Marnier or other orange liquer. If you're looking for a Chinese influence, you could simmer it with a star anise or two. There are any number of duck a l'orange recipes online (duck and goose are fairly similar flavour wise) if you ...


2

I just made orange juice with a blender. Remove the orange peel and separate the pieces, patiently remove the pips. Blend lightly for about 30-45 seconds. Put sugar and black salt, a hint of lemon. No need to remove the pulp, it was very good. I used the Indian Nagpur variety not tangerines.


2

With a masticating juicer, I've averaged 56% juice from unpeeled oranges (navel).


2

You might take a strategy from a orange olive oil cake that I make. Cut about 1/2 inch off the ends of oranges. Then quarter the oranges. Place them in a pot of water, then bring to the boil. Drain and repeat 3 to 4 times. This reduces the bitterness of the pith. Now, add 4 cups of water and 1 cup of sugar to the pot. Add the oranges and bring to a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible