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39

There is lots of use for high temperatures. Especially pizza is the first thing that comes to mind; there is no home oven which can get to the proper temperatures for a Neapoletana (which are above 500 Celsius), but more is always better. Of course, the salesman will tell you what you need to hear to buy his product, don't listen to him. This still doesn't ...


26

To clarify: forced-air (a/k/a "convection", a/k/a "fan bake") ovens rely on a fan to circulate the air in the oven. The fast-moving air substantially enhances the rate at which heat is transferred to the food. It is particularly good where you want the surface to brown, such as roasts and breads; it is not as good for more delicate items, such as custards ...


26

Removing things from the oven halfway through is not very friendly to baked goods. In general, they'll collapse as they cool off since the structure isn't cooked and set, and the leavening (baking soda/powder in these cases) will be spent, so there's no way to get what you originally wanted. It might be something like what'd happen if you forgot the ...


26

Couldn't I just use a lower temperature setting? No, you can't. Ovens are very bad at keeping a constant temperature. Not only is the oven thermostat usually off, it also cycles around its mean temperature a lot. So your food is subjected to constantly changing temperature. If you were to set your oven to 100C, you 1) won't get really 100C, and 2) won't ...


19

It shouldn't be a problem. I would probably use a lower cooking temperature however. Start with a highish temperature of about 180-200C, to bring the meat out of the danger zone quickly, then lower it to 80-90 for a long slow cook. You will probably want to introduce some liquid to the pan to avoid it all drying out.


17

I agree with Jay's answer that one of the reasons is because of keeping the skin crispy, but I don't agree about the difference with other types of poultry and have a bit more background info. The root difference between duck and other poultry is that duck is much fattier, and most of that fat is stored under the skin. If you don't do anything about the fat,...


17

As you probably know, making Macarons is tough, especially making them at home. But it is possible as I have been able to create perfect macarons in my home kitchen, using Italian and french meringue. The Italian meringue always got me better results. There are many reasons why your macarons don't come out like expected. First off, the meringue. It should ...


16

Sure it's safe, there's no risk in putting jam in baked goods. It says refrigerate after opening so it doesn't spoil after being left out too long - some people don't realize it needs to be refrigerated after opening because it is stored in the cupboard before opening. The important thing for food safety is to make sure that the pastries are eaten soon ...


16

This sounds like you might be talking about a european style oven, which generally has 2 types of inserts, wire shelves and solid trays. Wire shelves are used when you want to cook something that is self-contained, like a casserole, baking dish, cookie sheet, etc. The space between the wires allows the free circulation of air, which is a good thing. Trays ...


15

There are differences between baking in a plastic bag and in a Dutch oven. If you have access to both, I prefer the Dutch oven. What both do is to Trap steam This makes your food a bit moister, and keeps pan juices and additions to the roast, like a dry rub or mirepoix, from drying out into an unappetizing, carbonized spot. It is not as important for ...


15

Yes, there's a risk, but it's not significantly higher than having most other home appliances turned on (eg, a lamp, dehumidifier, dish washer or dryer). Although it heats up, a full-sized oven is insulated, and you're not operating at a very high temperature. Provided it seals well, even if there's a fire, there would be little oxygen to sustain it. I ...


15

It would depend on the type of glass. If the oven is say 300 F then starting from 40 F (fridge) versus 70 F (room) is not a big difference. If the glass is oven safe then that 30 F difference should not cause failure. 70 F to 375 F is a bigger difference than 40 F to 300 F.


14

Hello Justin, First of all, a question like this should be answered by an expert in materials science, and I’m not. Bear that in mind when you read the following. Generally, you should not take it for granted that coffee mugs are oven safe. Quite simply, some are and some are not. However, high quality coffee mugs produced for the catering industry; ...


13

Yes, there is a difference. You shouldn't be baking a cake (or anything else) in a microwave oven. A microwave oven excites the water within your food. When you put in dough or batter, the excited water doesn't bind with the starch the way it does under normal heat, it escapes the starch, leaving you with a stone-hard piece of dough or batter. There is ...


13

I'll come out and say "no, you can't make microwave popcorn in a conventional oven." For popcorn to pop, the kernel must reach a temperature well above boiling (which builds up steam, causing the kernel to explode). It must do so very quickly, otherwise the moisture will just slowly evaporate out, simply drying the kernel rather than popping it. Microwave ...


13

Microwave + Coffee Cup = Awesome A few years ago I was looking for a project for some cub scouts when I came across this recipe to make chocolate cake in a microwave. It's delicious and easy. Best of all you can make it in the office. Check out this link: http://howto.wired.com/wiki/Make_Cake_in_a_Mug


13

You can cook anything in a gas oven that you can cook in an electric oven. There might be a little extra moisture (due to the products of combustion), but some people consider that to be an advantage when baking bread and cooking roasts.


12

The usual materials used in an oven (no matter if electric or gas) are almost all food-safe non-melting materials used for cooking vessels. If you can use it on a stove top, it should be OK for the oven too (unless it has a handle from a different material). Metal. Oven pans are made from non-reactive metals (like stainless steel) or reactive metals with a ...


12

Microwaves specifically heat water molecules in the food. This turns them to steam, and because the air in the microwave is actually cool, the steam then condenses. There is often not proper air circulation to move the steam away from the food. Often times the outside edges of the food will not be soggy, but rather burnt, because they receive more energy and ...


12

Rounding to the nearest 10C is more accurate than your thermostat probably is anyway (don't round up, round to the nearest). Conversion isn't your issue, your thermostat is much more likely your culprit. Use an oven thermometer, not your dial. And keep in mind that ovens hover above and below their set temperature by switching on and off. Use Google or ...


11

You can try to bake both at the lower temperature, and it might turn out OK, but there are a lot of variables that could cause it not to. I went into some of the effects of time and temperature in this answer. In a nutshell, you have two major processes happening when you bake dough; the first is the Maillard reaction (browning) and the second is water ...


11

Short answer: They're probably not safe. Unlike "microwave safety", there isn't a safety risk in contaminating the food contents of the jars due to heating in an oven; in this case you just run the risk of the jars breaking. I am not sure what the symbols on the bottom of your jar mean; (see edit below) from what I understand—unlike plastic resin ...


11

They're the same thing - convection ovens are also known as fan-assist ovens (see for example wikipedia), since they're basically an oven with a fan. Maybe what you had previously was marketed as a fan-assisted oven, and threw out the phrase "conventional cooking" to emphasize that you can still do everything you conventionally could. But it sounds like you'...


11

The general answer is that you use a loaf pan if you want the common rectangular loaf shape (it's good for slicing for toast and sandwiches), and otherwise you don't need one. For example, the link you gave for french bread completely describes how to shape and bake the loaf. There's no wrapping in foil or anything; you coax it into that shape, and it's ...


11

Absolutely not. There are a lot of tricks to get good thick (or thin) pizza with oven temperatures under 300C (572F). The people at Serious Eats have researched the problem at great length and with excellent results. Few home ovens reach 300C. I made this pizza last weekend using the recipe in the above link, my oven's top temperature is 274C (525F): ...


11

I cannot speak to price; I haven't comparison-shopped with this feature in mind. However, I have used various home gas ranges with either type of broiler. I'll go ahead and sum it up: tl;dr: I greatly prefer an in-oven broiler. Here's why. First, positioning. Broiler drawers are typically located at the very bottom of the range, underneath the actual ...


11

Let me suggest a totally different approach: Why not work with the cool conditions instead of against? You could let the dough proof for a long time, e.g. overnight in the fridge. This allows for a lot less yeast and hence a less yeasty taste, which is usually desired. Also, more complex flavors develop during long proofing times. (There is a reason ...


11

This is an issue I've had to come to terms with myself. I spent most of my catering life spoilt by having a massive fan assisted electric ovens with space for 24 trays at once. Then one day I left it all behind to work in a tiny 2 chef kitchen where all we had was a bottom heated gas oven. The first 6 months was a nightmare. It's still not easy even to this ...


11

You are creating a bain-marie. It is used to gently heat the food and to stop the food scorching or boiling. When used for custards it stops them curdling. For cheesecakes the technique is used to stop the centre cracking.


11

First off, the terminology issue. So, can someone please clear up this fog? What's the difference between Microwave and Oven and Microwave Oven? "Microwave" is just short for "microwave oven". Both terms mean the same thing: an appliance that uses microwave radiation to heat food. Cooking food in this way is called "microwaving". An oven, on the other ...


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