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You might try putting a pan of water in the water oven to create a more humid cooking environment. One of the by products of burning gas is water vapor, which may have slowed down how quickly the skin of the chicken was browning.


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If your oven goes down to the correct temperature then you won't have a problem. My oven goes down to 75C and I've done plenty of beef jerky with it. If the oven isn't a convection oven it will take longer and it helps to flip the meat halfway through. My previous oven was a gas oven that didn't have as precise control of the temperature, so I turned it ...


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Oven thermostats are wildly inaccurate. The variability across ovens is great. What was "full heat" on your earlier oven, might not be anywhere close to what your new oven is achieving. You are correct about temperature and time. Additionally, oven temperature is not the temperature at which your food is actually cooking, due to evaporative ...


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so I have used a laser temperature probe pointed at the chicken and adjusted the dial so that this value is 180C That's not how you are meant to do it. 180 C is the oven temperature, not the temperature of the chicken skin. If you turned it up until the chicken surface became 180, that's way too hot, and of course it causes the exact symptoms you describe. ...


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I still consider myself a novice at bread baking. One point that I keep coming across is that home ovens are designed to vent steam but we want a moist environment in order to prevent the crust from setting too early before the bread has a chance to expand (and probably a few other reasons). A common and effective way is to bake the bread inside another ...


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Probably also not a complete answer (can there ever be for such questions?), but the main criteria for me with a focus on bread would be (in no particular order): Maximum temperature. For bread, 250°C is usually good, but speaking from experience, the step from bread to pizza is small and for those, the hotter the better. Sturdy rails and racks. I bake my ...


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The most important thing is that your oven can maintain a humid environment. Features such as vents, designed to reduce the odour of cooking food when you open the oven door, are therefore undesirable. Some people say that this makes fan ovens unsuitable, but at least in the UK, most new ovens are fan ovens (and often the fan cannot be disabled) and people ...


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This is borderline opinion based but I'll take a shot. I have used fan and non fan ovens to bake bread, and you can get excellent results either way. When I used a fan only oven I would typically make an air diverter out of tin foil to keep the fan from blowing directly on the bread, which worked really well. I also used a large ceramic coated cast iron pot ...


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