7

Like MaxW said, it's starchy water. This happens because Pasta is made from flour, water, and sometimes egg—that means it’s basically just starch and protein rolled out into different shapes and dried. It’s the starch molecules that are important. Once they’re heated in a moist environment—like your pot of water—the starch will absorb more and more ...


6

Yes! Fresh/frozen green peas can really easily be overcooked. They'll lose the bright green, getting more dull and a bit darker. They'll also get mushy. If you've had both nicely cooked fresh/frozen peas and canned peas, this should be pretty familiar to you. If you mean something dried, more like beans, then sure, you can still overcook. The color is ...


6

Fat/juice release and overcooking are not the same thing. Release of liquid (including a bit of fat/oil) is not just a sign of overcooking. Sous vide fish, even down in the 110-125F (43-52C) range, releases liquid, and it's definitely not overcooked. The overcooked fish smell is not just because of fat, and does not happen with short cooking at 50-55C. If ...


5

Short answer: That is well above the 130°F (55°C) at which the bacteria will die. You over coagulated your milk proteins and made cheese. Long answer: After scalding and cooling, yogurt is kept warm to incubate the bacteria. The bacteria munch on lactose in the milk and produce lactic acid. The acid denatures the milk protein, causing protein molecules to ...


4

No, it's pretty much just a sign it's cooked. One of the common tests for doneness for fish is that the layers flake apart. For something that small, that means the whole fish can break up. It could also be overcooked (it's not like it stops being flaky once it gets at all past cooked) but it can't be that badly overcooked at that temperature.


3

You're not expecting the same texture if you re-cook, that's why many re-cook recipes involve shredding the meat before the second part of the process - separating it as long fibres. Chicken Tinga, Pulled Pork, etc use this as the basis of the texture of the dish. Using fattier cuts can mitigate the drying out. Personally, if I have a long cook that's going ...


2

It is basically a gooey starch "gravy." Boiling noodles adds water to noodles but also extracts some starch from them. So it just starch water as if you had added flour to water.


2

You didn't mention if the beans were completely submerged in the water, so if not, please make sure they are. Second, assuming all the beans were of the same age, I find that soaking the beans evens things out. The speed of the pressure cooker can only overcome so much resistance to moisture in the beans themselves. I have cooked very old beans that ...


2

Your pork will not become tender for quite a while. If you plan to shred it, you'll want to aim for about 205 degrees F / 96 degrees C. You don't have to go that high if your goal is to slice. Either way, a cut like pork shoulder is best cooked low and slow to allow all of the marbled fat to break down. It's an incredibly resilient cut of meat, but it ...


2

Most ricer cookers use temperature of the pan - which is regulated by water content! - to decide when to stop. Only when enough water has evaporated to leave you with reasonably dry, palatable grains can the pan temperature exceed 100°C/212°F. If what you are cooking cannot absorb all the water, the device will cook until all the water has evaporated (which ...


2

In many cases, you're not supposed to re-cook the meat, you just need to warm it through. You do need to cook it through the first time, but you just want to avoid overcooking it too much. If you overcook it, then yes, it's better to shred it and put it in some sort of flavorful liquid to let it soak up some liquid. (this is best to do while it's still ...


2

You could do it carnitas style. https://cafedelites.com/pork-carnitas-mexican-slow-cooked-pulled-pork/ Cook meat. It will get dried out. Save the fat that cooked out of the meat! Hand shred dried out overcooked meat. Fry shreds in fat. YUM!


1

Chicken is very easy to be overcooked — whether on the grill, on the stove top or in the oven. On the grill, you can usually remove the burnt edges, and the inside will still be moist. The stove top and oven are a little trickier, though, since typically the meat is dried-out on the inside too. Change up the meal by shredding the dry chicken and adding ...


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