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6

[Possibly irrelevant-to-you aside: a true Hungarian goulash (as opposed to a North American or German or what-have-you goulash) is a soup. It includes a few root vegetables and possibly some "pinched noodles" (tiny little egg+flour dumplings) in the soup itself, but it is served with a hearty slice of bread or two, nothing more. So in that sense, the answer ...


6

While hitchhiking from Portland to San Diego I shared the back of a pickup truck with two men who loved to cook. Their recommendation: Smell the food, smell the spice, if your mouth waters. add the spice. Same goes for combinations of foods. Just as simple as that.


5

tl;dr : yes, there are, but european & asian are diametrically opposed when dealing with 'food pairing', but make sure the meal is 'balanced'. In many European cuisines, the tendency is to select herbs and spices that 'work well together', often called 'food pairing'. This means that they have some chemical compounds in common with the other ...


5

In my experience, dry wines risk being completely killed by hot food. The classical pairing would be an aromatic white, like Gew├╝rztraminer or Riesling, with substantial sweetness. Germany is the role model here, especially the wines around Sp├Ątlese and Auslese levels, with Alsace a close second. (They're also great QPR, but that's a secondary concern.) ...


5

Mesquite is a very assertive flavor that typically goes with beef, especially fatty beef. Pecan and hickory are stronger than apple, but milder than mesquite, and are great for pork or poultry, and work just fine with beef. Applewood is very flexible, a bit lighter and sweeter. It's the only one of the woods you mentioned that I would consider using with ...


5

Homemade paneer, made with full-fat milk. Full-fat is important, as fat shields the capsaicin receptors in your tongue, and can make spicy food more palatable for those that can't handle spice. You can buy paneer at an Indian market, but you can make it at home with minimal effort. All you need is a gallon of whole milk, some lemon juice, a pot to boil it ...


5

Paneer is the obvious one. It can be used as a primary ingredient in a curry.


4

In Ireland boiled or glazed ham is a staple. Traditionally it's had with cut up cabbage (ideally you would cook the cabbage in the same water the ham was boiled in as this gives it lovely flavour) but you could just cut it up and pan fry it with a little butter. Normally it would be served with boiled floury potatoes. Traditionally (in Ireland) you wouldn'...


4

Liquid smoke is made from distilling actual smoke and so, to some degree, it tastes like the wood it comes from. For example, I can detect fruity apple notes in apple wood. Of course, the flavor of smoke itself is far more potent than any of the notes imparted by the type of the wood. In my experiments, I have found that any kind of wood (or liquid smoke) ...


4

First, a caveat: different people and different cultures have different tastes, so no pairing recommendations are likely to be perfect for you. Books You can find books on this topic, for example by searching for flavor pairing on Amazon. A couple of the most popular ones: The Flavor Bible - for each ingredient, lists a large number of other ingredients ...


3

No, not in a useful sense. There are many, many ingredients and flavors, and while there are trends about what works, they aren't rules: there are so many exceptions that you can't actually use the trends to predict whether a given pairing is a good idea, especially since people's tastes and cuisines vary wildly. With experience, you'll likely develop ...


3

I have had success pairing steaks with freshly pressed apple juice, as the tartness helps offset the richness and fats of the meat and cheese. An apple/raspberry mix works beautifully, too, as does apple and blackcurrant. While ginger beer and ginger ale may work, you run the risk of the drink taking over the show, which you don't want. Two more pairings ...


3

Sweet and sour red cabbage, cuts through the richness of the goulash very nicely - particularly if you cook some thin slices of tart apples with the cabbage. The vinegar also turns the cabbage vivid purple which also adds a nice contrast to earthy goulash. I found this recipe that is almost identical to my mom's (although I probably would opt out of using ...


2

What's in season now are root vegetables, squashes, and some greens and cabbages. You'll need something that can stand up to or compliment a rich dish like goulash, how about roasted beets with sour cream, which would tie into the sour cream in the goulash? It's such a simple dish: roast your beets skin-on (or steam them), let them cool enough then peel with ...


2

Parsley sauce is a traditional English accompaniment to ham. Simply infuse milk with parsley stalks, onion, and bay leaf, then strain and use the milk to make a white sauce (i.e. with a roux) and add chopped fresh parsley leaves at the end. It works very well.


2

The classic flavour pairing with rhubarb is vanilla: rhubarb and vanilla custard is a British staple. Fresh custard (Creme Anglaise, as the French call it) is easy to make and delicious. Almond also pairs well with rhubarb. You could incorporate ground almonds into the cobbler mix, or perhaps fold some amaretto liqueur into lightly whipped cream to serve ...


2

I probably would not recommend eating a box of baking soda and chasing that with shots of vinegar. But aside from that silliness, I can't think of a single thing that is actual "food" that is unsafe mixed with another actual "food", assuming reasonable quantities. Certainly anything with alcohol can be dangerous in huge quantities, as can a lot of other ...


1

In an article publishes in Nature, researchers have created a flavor map which can tell you if two ingredients work well together. They have checked flavor compounds in many popular ingredients, and if two ingredients have flavor compounds in common they are linked in the map and will go well together in food. Check the article (http://www.nature.com/...


1

Balance the basic six tastes - sweet, bitter, salty, umami, sour, fat. Be aware that bitter is not as one dimensional as it seems. There are many possible balances. Having protein (no matter if plant or animal based - umami, often accompanied by fat), carbs (sweet), mineral (salty), fruit/vitamin (sour,sweet) and herbal/vegetable (bitter) elements is not as ...


1

There's one that goes "If it grows together, it goes together." That is to say that often ingredients that are produced in the same region (and often during the same season) will often pair well with each other.


1

The white wines I would pair with this sort of dish would have sweetness and acidity, plus a bit of a mineral edge, so Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling, Chenin Blanc, Viognier, or maybe an un-oaked Chardonnay. There are some red wines that would work as well but you'd want light without too many tannins, for instance a beaujolais, pinot noir, cincaut, or ...


1

Look for wines that are produced in the cheese region...or cheeses produced in the wine region (not culture, since there is wide regional variation). A good general rule is if it produced in very close proximity, it will probably work well together. Once you recognize flavor profiles of wines and cheeses, you can branch out and experiment. Personally, I ...


1

Seen the cheeses you are planning to serve, and the central place they should take, nothing should distract from them. So, bread of course, no toast. Maybe thin slaces of hard apple or grapes. In the south of france it is common to put a tiny bit of olive oil on cheese, particuraly goat cheeses, which improves the mouth-feeling. Of course, it should be a ...


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