Hot answers tagged

60

They look like the Dutch "mini pancake" pans... they're used to make poffertjes. There are nearly identical pans on sale here. The Wikipedia article talks about them more specifically: Poffertjes are a traditional Dutch batter treat. Resembling small, fluffy pancakes, they are made with yeast and buckwheat flour. Unlike American pancakes, they have a ...


39

Firstly, light-bottomed pans exist partly because they save cost and weight (the latter being relevant for, say, taking a pan when hiking). However, there are applications for which a light-bottomed pan can be preferable. These are when you need responsiveness to external heat more than heat retention and evenness. Taking a light pan off the stove will more ...


30

That pan is identical to the one used to make a Thai dessert that is made out of a coconut mixture. I live in Thailand and see them almost every day. It is called Kanom Krok and is very popular throughout Thailand.


28

Tilt the lid. It will stay where you put it… approximately. See pan top left & pyrex bottom right; they will stay like that all day if needed If it really refuses to stay, then wedge a spatula [or any other bit of wood or plastic (& of course, not metal if it's going in the microwave) of any appropriate size]* in it, either from the edge, down the ...


24

Thin cut meat will curl if there is an outside perimeter of gristle or silverskin (which there usually is). Those things shrink faster than the meat, causing the curling. Take a pair of kitchen shears or a sharp knife and make tiny cuts (it shouldn't take more than 1/4 inch) every inch or so around the perimeter of the steak, just into the meat itself. That ...


23

Lining with foil works well with cooking methods like baking or broiling, where the food is not stirred or manipulated much, and so the foil can sit undisturbed. With stir frying, you are quite likely to break through the foil while doing the stirring, and have to clean up fully in any case. Also, you probably would not get as good a stir fry due the thin ...


22

Cook's Illustrated has demonstrated that different baking sheets can cook differently. They found that some of the sheets would cook unevenly or would even cook faster than other sheets, in the case of a double-layer one they tried. Their results were that finish (light or dark) was not as important in determining how a sheet behaved. More important was ...


16

You can't effectively line a Bundt pan with paper. My favorite method is to mix cake release and keep it in the cabinet. It lasts for months and months. Just mix 1 part vegetable oil, 1 part shortening and 1 part flour (roughly, by volume). Brush that mixture in the pan, getting all the nooks and crannies. It doesn't make the mess that traditional flouring ...


16

Funny enough, I saw a little silicone gadget the other day when I was out shopping - those stick men called Lid Sid are designed to do exactly what you want. Granted, they are real unitaskers, but also kind of fun. Other manufacturers make similar items in other shapes - I have seen sheep, witches and others.


13

This review does not make sense as it's incompatible with the physical laws of the universe. A change in bakeware material or thickness may alter how quickly heat is transferred from the air in the oven to the food, perhaps enough to change cooking time in some cases but not significantly enough to burn things. Take for example a thick cast-iron pan versus ...


11

There are a couple of reasons, traditional and some functional: The home cultures where these recipes are indigenous use a wok, so many recipe authors go the same way Woks are usually made out of carbon steel, and are poor conductors of heat. This means that the strongest heat from the concentrated heat source is in the center/bottom of the wok. As you go ...


10

I would actually recommend the opposite of what was said above. Since the meat is so thin you may have much better results pan searing it in an extremely hot pan from slightly frozen. This way the outermost layer will start to undergo the maillard reaction long before the inside of the steak reaches a medium-rare temp and will give you a better chance of ...


10

This kind of pan seems to be used in many cuisines. In addition to the Dutch poffertjes, and the thai desert mentioned in another answer, an identical pan is used to make a south Indian dish called Puddu or Paniyaram. From the Wikipedia article: Paddu or Kuzhi paniyaram is an Indian dish made by steaming batter using a mould. The batter is made of ...


10

The specks are corrosion pits. Austenitic stainless (aka- 18-8 , 304 , and several other numbers) are notorious for pitting in salt (halides). The 316 and 317 with molybdenum are more resistant but I doubt any cookware producer would go to the extra expense to use these alloys. However, I expect sitting for a couple days with salted water would be needed for ...


8

The simplest way to remove kidney cores is to cut the kidneys in half (horizontally) then snip the cores out with a pair of sharp scissors. With practice this can be done in two or three quick cuts.


8

No. Neither plain stainless steel nor non-stick pans (which yours is as it's coated with Teflon) need to be seasoned. Not only is seasoning unnecessary, but it will only cause your pan to look dirty. It would do no good at all. Seasoning is all about preventing rust and sealing "pores", making the surface more resistant to sticking. Neither of those things ...


8

First of all, a Teflon pan will get gradually ruined anyway. Even when you don't use oil, the heat and the food itself will wear out the coating, it is just very sensitive this way. Using oil will speed up the process. Second, both existing technologies for nonstick pans, PTFE (Teflon) and ceramic, will get ruined by oil. If you want to cook with olive oil ...


8

If anything is leeching, it would be stuff leeching onto your frying pan, not the other way around. It looks like the spots on the inside bottom of your pan are hard water deposits, maybe combined with residue from food cooked in the pan. Yes, at least in the photo it does have kind of a brownish tint to it, but I don't think it is rust, as stainless steel ...


8

A different option is to use a silicon lid. You don't have to leave it open, you just cover the pot fully and it bleeds off steam on its own just like a tilted solid lid.


7

While all of these are large pots (or may at least come in large sizes) they have different purposes, which lead to differences in typical construction. Saucepans are intended for general purpose cookery, and usually have solid construction, and permit searing in the pot, reducing, and a variety of other tasks. They are the most difficult to characterize ...


7

It looks possible that the two pieces don't actually go together. The patent referred to is number 625702, for an enameled chafing dish with a domed lid. (It's kind of hard to tell, but I think the innovation being claimed is the lip/indentation which allows the handle to be attached without damaging the enamel.) The patent does mention the inventor's ...


7

Liquid naturally comes out of all meats as they cook. If you're using high heat and a frying pan, you don't really notice it because it evaporates quickly. That brown stuff you see in a frying pan after cooking meat on high heat are the evaporated juices. If you're baking them at around 350 F, you'll also notice water being released. This is amplified if ...


7

50% seems a big difference to me, but if you're comparing against a baking tray that keeps the bottom of the cake cool for several minutes, then switching to one that heats through very quickly will certainly mean the cake has less time-to-live in a hot oven before it starts to "burn". If you're only baking for a few minutes anyway then the time the pan ...


7

Thermodynamics indicates heat transfer through contact (conduction) is the most significant means of heat transfer. Rate of heating via conduction is a factor of type of material and thickness of material. Law of thermodynamics applies to "sideways" distribution as well as through heating. So let's take an extreme case: Starting from room temperature, with ...


7

If by "paper tape" you mean "strips of (food safe) paper or parchment" then yes, it's possible. But before we talk about the how, let's have a quick look at the why first: Most cooks want to match the size of the bun to the size of the patty or vice versa. Unfortunately, some recipes can be a bit unpredictable as far as the rising and expansion of the buns ...


7

I think the answer to your question lies in the etymology of the words. Pan is actually coming from Germaic pfanne (in Dutch panne). Which is from Latin patina (shallow pan, dish) and Greek patane (dish, plate). On the other hand, pot also has Germanic roots it means vessel (also in Dutch) coming from pottus (drinking cup) for Latin. So the difference as ...


6

In the general case, it is not possible. As you cook meat past about 165 F, all of the proteins will have denatured and contracted, squeezing out moisture. This is what makes well done meat tough and stringy or rubbery. This process cannot really be reversed, although you can try to mask it with a sauce. In the specific case of certain cuts--the ones ...


6

It would appear the pan is non stick, in which case buttering and flouring it should be sufficient. The only way to line it with parchment would involve using multiple separate sheets, which might cause weird batter leakages between the sheets.


6

The unnecessarily complex gastronomic chemistry way: Sous vide the steak to 130F / 54.5 C (perfect medium-rare for beef muscle). Then use your pan (or blowtorch) to add some nice maillard browning.


6

The metal pan is a toaster, an accessory for the Manning-Bowman white enamel chafing dish. see 1907 brochure from company link: https://archive.lib.msu.edu/DMC/sliker/msuspcsbs_manb_manningbow2/msuspcsbs_manb_manningbow2.pdf


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