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9

I'm giving you slightly contrarian advice axed on typical indian household recipe. A) if I understand right your main problem is that the paneer crumbles in your curry. B) unlike Indian restaurants in western countries, paneer which is tough and squeaks between teeth is not considered right! Paneer should be soft but firm and hold together. Follow my sister'...


7

Milk proteins will coagulate at particular temperatures and Phs. You wrote that you used 2 Tbs of lemon juice but you didn't say how much milk you added that to. If you used too much milk then the mixture will not be acidic enough. Follow a recipe. You also wrote that you boiled the milk once. I don't know if it is a language barrier issue but it sounds ...


4

Looking at the question, Why is my Paneer crumbly, the key is not to boil the milk, the milk should be floculated once the milk reaches 98 C, Acetic acid is best, a quick guide would be to heat the milk to 98 C add acetic acid 1/10, mix the floculated solids in the hot whey, drain in a colander and place in a cheese cloth, if possible apply 20 - 60 psi of ...


4

No, you can't substitute any of those for paneer. This should be pretty obvious given that you're trying to skewer and grill the paneer. It's a firm cheese that doesn't melt, while any combination of milk, yogurt, cream cheese, and butter will melt, if it's not liquid already. The best substitutes would be other cheeses like halloumi that don't melt, or else ...


4

I didnt think paneer melts. You can boil it and boil it in a curry and it still maintains its shape. But you can eat it raw! :-)


4

I live in one of the largest cheese producing areas in the US. Freezing cheese is often frowned upon here, it often changes the texture of the cheese and can alter the flavor as well. Cheese, much like anything else, can freezer burn. Firmer cheeses typically are affected the least by being frozen. You'll probably see a lot of the whey separate out of the ...


4

Unfortunately, even if you press it, it will tend to crumble. The way the curds form in small curd cottage cheese forms a skin that makes them tend to fall apart. The same thing can happen in making Indian style paneer if you let the curds boil. (At least, I think it is why it happened!) Probably your best bet is to drain it then make something like vada or ...


3

You probably need a (small) cheese press and a proper cheese cloth. My attempts to improvise using chopping boards never drained well enough giving the effect you describe. It also doesn't brown nicely when you cook it, if it's too wet. When properly pressed it will cut into better pieces. You also need to press with some force for quite a while. Recipes ...


3

Raghavan Iyer's book, 660 Curries has recipes for both Whole-milk cheese (doodh paneer) and creamy homemade cheese (malai paneer). The only difference between teh two recipes is that the Malai paneer uses half-and-half while the doodh paneer uses whole milk.


3

Just run the drained paneer in microwave for 2-3 minutes (time depends on the quantity and water content in the crumbled cheese) before putting it in the fridge to set. Do press and assemble it in the desired shape before you put it in microwave. I use a rectangular glass container which helps. Again - Test it once before you put it in your curry- Press ...


3

Try goat milk, and most assuredly raw milk. I use about 2/3 cup of vinegar per gallon, and a friend saves the cream-heavy stuff for me. Heat to 180, add acid, curdle 10 minutes, then strain, ball, press, etc. I think boiling is a mistake - as soon as you hit 180F, add the acid and stop the heat. Also, once the block is pressed, soak in ice water for 3 hours ...


2

To make the paneer firm press the curdled milk between two flat plates, and keep some heave object over them. Let this stay for 1-2 hours. This make the paneer firm and solid. In the restaurants usually they fry the paneer cubes in some amount of oil, which makes it chewy. I usually prepare a large block of paneer and store it in the ...


2

You can purchase a Japanese pickle press (one of the world's great inventions) and use it to press the paneer. They cost between $12-$20 online depending upon the size and are extremely versatile and dishwasher safe.


2

I have seen frozen paneer before. It is certainly not a good Idea to Freeze it. It turns yellow(off-whitish, due to the acids used in separation of cheese from milk) and loses texture ( as mentioned by @tsturzl ). When you thaw it if you find a lot of difference in taste and smell than that would be because it's past best before date. Paneer normally has ...


2

No you won't get a suitable result. The cottage cheese has already re absorbed a lot of the liquid and you won't be able to get rid of it. Since you are thinking of hanging it anyway, why don't you make your own? Just follow a cottage cheese recipe but let the curd hang a few hours longer.


2

(I'm in Germany, in case that is relevant) Here, you can eat/drink most dairy products without boiling - with the exception of raw milk that is sold "has to be boiled before consumption". Milk: possibly because in your country milk is usually sold raw? Cheese: some recipes/processes call for boiling at various steps, e.g. for removing whey. Not all cheese ...


1

The milk could be adulterated, treated with detergent, urea, or made using milk powder. Milk instantly curdles to form cottage cheese when lemon juice or vinegar is added. Adulteration is rampant in India. Even if it's just diluted with water it should curdle to some extent; even skimmed milk curdles, although it would produce less cottage cheese. The ...


1

Paneer is a fresh cheese, which gives it a short shelf life, typically under two weeks if kept refridgerated. Outside we are talking a few hours. The higher water content of soft cheeses makes them a better medium for the growth of pathogens. Paneer will go bad before one can tell from visual inspection. If you are like 90% of the population, trying a ...


1

Personally I always buy multiple packages when on sale and freeze the stuff. I take it out of the freezer the day before I want to use it. It stays firm and tasty. The longest I've kept it in the freezer was about two months.


1

A half gallon of whole milk makes about 10 ounces of paneer (From the kitchn). So conversions and cross-multiplication later, about 670ml of whole milk will make about 100g of paneer. Since it's not an exact science, how about using a quart (946ml) of milk, 2 TBS of lemon juice and 1/8-1/4 tsp salt. That should yield about 140g of cheese, giving you a little ...


1

I have found that pasteurized milk will make excellent curds as long as the milk is not ultra-pasteurized (UHT). I use non-homogenized whole milk that has only been Vat or Batch pasteurized.That pasteurization process does not kill the bacteria necessary for proper curdling or coagulation of the milk. This type of milk produces the same quality of curds as ...


1

I was born and raised in India and have loved Paneer all my life. I actually agree with vagabond 100%. Paneer in grocery stores and Indian restaurants in the US would not pass as acceptable in India. Good paneer should indeed by quite moist and soft and yet should never fall apart. I have struggled myself quite a bit with getting the right texture - my ...


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