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55

Cayenne pepper powder comes from the cayenne pepper. It is hot/spicy, registering 30,000 to 50,000 Scoville units. Chilli powder, depending where you live, can mean anything between pure powdered chilli pepper (location would determine the specific type of pepper) to a spice blend of chillies with cumin, oregano, and/or other spices. Depending on the ...


22

They give a similar range of flavours, but in quite different proportions. They’re all made from ground roasted or dried red peppers of some kind, so all of them involve some amounts of spiciness (chilli heat), fruitiness, earthiness, and other aspects of the flavour of roasted peppers. Cayenne typically has much more of the hotter and sharper flavours ...


21

I use a 3 inch Tea Infuser Ball and hold it at a good distance above my cookies when dusting powdered sugar so that it will spread out even further. It will most likely work for paprika as well.


21

There's a gadget for that – a mini sifter, or "chef's duster" as it's apparently called by some. They're meant for powdered sugar, but since these are smaller than, say, a flour sifter, you should be able to use it for small amounts of any powder you'd like, included powdered paprika.


18

This recipe list chili powder as: 2 tablespoons paprika 2 teaspoons oregano 1 1/2 teaspoons cumin 1 1/2 teaspoons garlic powder 3/4 teaspoon onion powder 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste (optional) There are other mixtures, but this one seem basic enough. The "heat" comes from the cayenne pepper. The other spices round out the flavor. So I'd mix ...


14

Your initial theory is good, your technique just needs to be tweaked. The further away your "dusting" hand, the more evenly your food will be dusted. So hold a pinch of paprika far from the chops, perhaps even over your head, do the little sprinkling motion with your fingers as you toss the paprika kind of into the air but in the direction of your chops. ...


11

Have you tried a flour duster? I find it an extremely useful, multi-purpose tool for creating an even dusting (light or heavy) of… whatever. It's multi-purpose and reusable, and it's small enough that you can just dip it into the container of whatever you want to creating a dusting of. You wave or tap the edge of it over what you want to dust, then ...


11

If the recipe is just asking for "Paprika", they want generic paprika labeled as such. Like this: According to the McCormick website, this is "sweet" paprika. The dried, ground pods of Capsicum annuum L., a sweet red pepper. Similarly, the Spice Islands site calls it sweet Vividly red in color, paprika is made from ground Capsicum chili peppers. ...


8

In the US, generic paprika is probably closest to bittersweet - not sweet and definitely not hot, just a middle of the road not-too-assertive variety. Recipes aren't likely to be too picky about the exact type, so in the end, you can get away with whatever you personally like.


7

I've not tried this, but I suspect you'll get better results by lightly coating some flat surface (such as a cutting board) with paprika and dipping the chops in after searing. That way you can control the amount of the spice that will transfer to the chop. On the downside, you'll need at least as much surface area as you have chop to cover. Let me know if ...


6

I think you are right to figure it is some kind of insect. Little thin threads of cocoonish material in containers of stored food are a pretty clear sign. The strings make themselves noticeable by catching the dust particles from the food. Although it might seem strange to find insect activity in instant coffee, there are tons of different kinds of insects, ...


5

There are two types of paprika extracts; one, as you mention, is mainly a food colour. I understand this is made from raw, unsmoked paprika. It has no real flavour. The other is mostly a smoke flavour. I believe it's taken from the smoked paprika leftovers, not from the raw paprika. Neither is any good for simulating the colour, texture, and taste of ...


5

If a recipe didn't specify which type of paprika to use (and I've never seen one that didn't) I would default to a 'sweet mild' paprika. Sweet refers to 'not chilli hot' rather than anything to do with sugar. Smoked paprika is a very particular ingredient used in very few cuisines so I wouldn't think of it as just a variant or substitute for the other ...


5

It depends. There are six different types. Hot, Hungarian, Plain, Smoked, Spanish, Sweet. The recipe you are following and your intended outcome will drive the decision on which to choose. Paprika releases its flavor with heat but burns easily. So mix it in with liquid, and make sure it gets hot. Sprinkled onto a cold dish (like deviled eggs), it remains ...


5

When a recipe tells about Paprika, it generally means, "whatever" paprika you want. There are two usages of paprika, colour, and taste. If you just want colour, use a sweet one, even a cheap one, it will have no taste but gives a nice colour. However, if you want a real taste, use real Hungarian paprika, there is a serious difference. The Hungarian ...


4

I would pull all your dry good items to the counter and wipe down your shelves to see if you see signs of insects (crawling & flying). Purge anything that is suspect, old are not used. Take that trash outside when done. Take close look at any bulk cereals, flour, imported dry goods, opened spices & herbs. Inspect the food items that are already ...


4

Sweet paprika isn't really sweet. It's not hot (and not bitter), but just as we sometimes call non-spicy (bell) peppers sweet peppers, sweet isn't used in quite the way it is to describe other things (like apples). Dulce, the Spanish word, correctly translates to sweet but it also translates to mild. Doux in French is related, but gentle, mild, soft are ...


4

It sounds like (benign, tasty) lactic acid bacteria fermentation, possibly along with leuconostoc or something. But without the appropriate levels of salt, it's also possible that less friendly microorganisms are also growing. As a rule, canned food with unexpected microbial activity -- regardless of process -- should always be discarded. Even if it's not ...


4

Here's what I do: pick up a little paprika on the back of a teaspoon (i.e. so the teaspoon is upside down with the paprika resting on what would normally be the underside of the spoon). Hold the teaspoon a couple of feet above the chop using your left hand (assuming you are right handed). Now gently and repeatedly tap the shaft of the teaspoon with another ...


3

Not exactly what you asked, but pork is often glazed. You could make a glaze with honey and smoked paprika and apply it after the searing. See for example this recipe for glazed ribs for some ideas on how to do it, or take inspiration from char siu if you feel more "oriental".


3

The book Putting Food By recommends canning pints or half pints (about the range you have) of hot-pack pimentos at 10lbs pressure (240F/116C) for 20 minutes (sorry for the American measurements, it's an American book). They also recommend putting a small amount of acid in the canning liquid, like 1tsp white vinegar per pint. By "hot-pack" they mean grilled,...


1

European (Spanish) paprika comes in a number of different guises, depending on the method used to process it and the variety of pepper used. There is sweet (also called smoked) paprika, hot (spicy) paprika and bitter paprika. The varieties generally sold in UK supermarkets are the latter two varieties. If you look out for the La Chanita variety, you will ...


1

My personal method for adding flavor to homemade mayonnaise is to include some flavored oil in addition to the vegetable oil. I like just a touch of chili oil (a teaspoon or so -- too much, and it gets too spicy and/or weirdly red). Paprika-infused oil can be purchased or made at home (Google search) -- this may meet your needs, or inspire you to try other ...


1

The variety of the original pepper might be slightly different giving out different result when dried and ground up. There might be a difference in spiciness. There might be a difference in smokiness (if the paprika is smoked). Hard to tell. Just try it and report back.


1

I think your approach is the right one. Chili has flavor, not just heat, so simply reducing the chili added will reduce the flavor and the heat. Using a mild chili powder like paprika will keep the chili flavor there while reducing the chili heat. African chili powder is generally very hot stuff, so I'd try a 7:1 ratio of paprika to african chili powder and ...


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