63

You should only grate cheese as needed, particularly the cheeses you mention. When you grate cheese you create more surface area. That is more surface exposed to air and oxidation, which will degrade the flavor and aroma of the cheese. It is also more prone to drying out further degrading the quality. The cheeses you mention are best when grated for ...


20

While you don't want to grate the cheese and store it in the fridge, as moscafj's answer says, there is a way you can grate all the parmesan, store it, and use it as needed - just keep it in the freezer. You can add it directly to whatever you're cooking, no need to defrost, although I don't know how well it would work scattered on top of a finished dish. ...


18

Processed cheese isn't a good replacement for parmesan, it's generally too soft from added oils, and it doesn't have the right flavor. Instead, add more pine nuts, and salt to taste, leaving the cheese out entirely. If you can't find pine nuts then cashews or almonds can be used instead. If you decide to try it use a bit less olive oil to make up for the ...


18

Short answer: Grated cheese goes moldy quickly. Long answer: We regularly grate cheese and pack them in vacuum bags in larger quantities. They usually go moldy within a week or two, even in the fridge. Frozen storage should be possible for months, if not years. (I kept grated cheese in the freezer for up to five years.) From a more general point of view, ...


10

I would suggest making a Mornay sauce (Béchamel sauce with cheese) which you should find will hold together well and provide an unctuous, rich, spreadable texture. Simply melt butter in a saucepan over a medium-low heat, whisk in an equal quantity of flour, cook it out a little, then add cold milk, whisking all the while, until you get a smooth sauce like ...


9

You need to make processed cheese, aka American cheese, out of it. Parmesan is harder to use in such an application than other cheeses, because it is drier. I would suggest starting with other cheeses until you have mastered the process. The basic process is to make a paste-like substance out of your cheese and some condensed milk in the food processor. ...


7

That recipe relies on starch exuded by the pasta to thicken the broth enough to emulsify the cheese. If your brand of pasta throws off less starch, the broth won't be thick enough to keep the cheese from globbing up. I suggest adding some corn starch slurry just before the cheese. Remove a quarter cup or so of the broth, allowing it to cool slightly; add ...


6

The bacterial cultures are what the document you quoted from refers to as "fermented whey". The previous paragraph in the Specification of the Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese from the Parmigiano-Reggiano Cheese Consortium web site reads as follows: Fermented whey is added to the milk, which is a natural culture of lactic ferments obtained from spontaneous ...


5

It's not traditional to add cheese to fish dishes in much of Italian cuisine. Historically, this may be more closely connected to economics and religious beliefs than for any culinary reason. As far as flavor development goes, if you like parmesean cheese with your fish based pasta dishes, by all means, use it. Getting the cheese to emulsify into the sauce ...


5

It would be edible (for true Parmesano Reggiano, anyway), but it may not be very pleasant, as it is where most salt from the brining period will be, and it is dry and hard. It is traditional to use pieces of it in soup to add flavor to the broth.


4

For texture, you’ll want to use a hard, dry and somewhat brittle cheese (such as Parmigiano, Grana Padano or Pecorino) which does not melt easily. The texture is right when you can break pieces off it with a Parmesan knife. If you can easily cut it into slices with a knife, it is probably too soft. The same probably goes for cheese which already comes in ...


4

I strongly disagree with the idea of storing it in an airtight container and using it quickly. I assume people suggest using it quickly because in an air-tight container you'll have condensed water in the box which will make your cheese go bad. I recommend to put it in a box and put the top on, but leave the top open a little bit (or use a box that lets ...


3

I have frozen eggplant Parmesan before with good results. I breaded the eggplant, fried it, then put Parmesan on top while it was still hot enough to melt. I let them cool and then froze the fried eggplant slices separated by pieces of parchment paper. When I needed to use them, I put them on a sheet pan, still frozen, and threw them in the oven until the ...


3

While ideally Parmesan may be stored (at home) in refrigerated environment, there is no harm done to it (assuming nothing else like condensation occurs) by allowing it to sit at a warmer temperature for a few days. It is, after all, aged at ambient temperature for 2 years. At least where I live, stores do not even put Parmesan in a refrigerated case; it is ...


2

Coming from Italian origin. I remember my grandmother and aunties in Italy leaving the block of Parmesan in the large round Parmesan grater that everyone seemed to have and that's where it stayed, in amongst the grated cheese. Because the lid has hundreds of small holes in it, the cheese would eventually dry out. However, this doesn't spoil the cheese as it'...


2

Smear butter to prevent drying. I have also experimented freezing parmesan. It does dry out a bit but still could be used in hot dishes like pasta.


2

Per Marcella Hazan, author of the wonderful "Essentials of Italian Cooking" - Wrap it tightly in wax paper, then in heavy-duty aluminum foil, being careful not to poke the foil. Store on the bottom shelf of your refrigerator. Works perfectly.


2

Fromage fort is an excellent way to use up all manner of cheeses - it makes for a thick cheese spread that sounds exactly like what you describe. You can certainly use just parmesan, though you may need to add some additional wine to compensate for its relative dryness.


1

As far as I can tell from the recipe, the parmesan cheese is included mostly for flavor, plus a little crispiness as suggested in a comment. The mozzarella and egg are what keep the base together. Omitting the parmesan altogether should work. You can substitute any hard(er) cheese. I would also recommend breadcrumbs if cheese is too expensive, but that will ...


1

I have had success breading eggplant and freezing it raw. You can then fry the eggplant (no need to even thaw) when it is time to construct your dish. With a little pre-prepared sauce in the freezer too you can have a scratch made eggplant parmigiano in approx. 15-20 mins.


1

I don't think this dish is ideal for freezing, but if you choose to do so, per Martha Stewart: To Freeze: Assemble dish but do not bake; wrap tightly with foil and freeze, up to 3 months. Thaw completely, then bake as directed.


1

Someone mentioned adding to soups and stocks...I also save them for that purpose. However, a family favorite, is to insert, with other aromatics, in the cavity of a chicken that will be roasted. Remove when carving and serve with the chicken. It will be soft and delicious.


1

Were I live as we have. Dip twice in melted bees wax. Store in a cool place. Or dip in wax. It can be put in jars of salt sea water. Then stored in a cool place. Bees wax seems to work best. I have found that for just a week wrap in plastic bags. Thin ones like you get at store. Put in fridge. This is 3rd world tropics. I like the idea in a jar with bread. ...


1

While on a visit to a Parmesan cheese factory in Italy, we were advised to wrap the cheese in a clean teatowel and keep it in the fridge. (by the way, dry rind pieces can be added to soups or stews to enrich the flavour.)


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