63

You should only grate cheese as needed, particularly the cheeses you mention. When you grate cheese you create more surface area. That is more surface exposed to air and oxidation, which will degrade the flavor and aroma of the cheese. It is also more prone to drying out further degrading the quality. The cheeses you mention are best when grated for ...


20

While you don't want to grate the cheese and store it in the fridge, as moscafj's answer says, there is a way you can grate all the parmesan, store it, and use it as needed - just keep it in the freezer. You can add it directly to whatever you're cooking, no need to defrost, although I don't know how well it would work scattered on top of a finished dish. ...


18

Short answer: Grated cheese goes moldy quickly. Long answer: We regularly grate cheese and pack them in vacuum bags in larger quantities. They usually go moldy within a week or two, even in the fridge. Frozen storage should be possible for months, if not years. (I kept grated cheese in the freezer for up to five years.) From a more general point of view, ...


18

Processed cheese isn't a good replacement for parmesan, it's generally too soft from added oils, and it doesn't have the right flavor. Instead, add more pine nuts, and salt to taste, leaving the cheese out entirely. If you can't find pine nuts then cashews or almonds can be used instead. If you decide to try it use a bit less olive oil to make up for the ...


4

For texture, you’ll want to use a hard, dry and somewhat brittle cheese (such as Parmigiano, Grana Padano or Pecorino) which does not melt easily. The texture is right when you can break pieces off it with a Parmesan knife. If you can easily cut it into slices with a knife, it is probably too soft. The same probably goes for cheese which already comes in ...


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