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Cilantro The leaf on the left is Coriander - it's a slightly lighter green, and has rounder leaves. Botanical Classification Coriandrum sativum is an annual herb in the family Apiaceae. Uses All parts: leaves, roots, stems and seeds are used in cooking either as a garnish, a key ingredient or as a powder. Regions used/found Native to Southern Europe, ...


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In most contexts, I would assume that simply means the leaves from the herb parsley. Depending on where your recipe originates—especially central Europe, or some Asian cultures—parsley root may also be used, so the recipe might be trying to make that clear. I suspect, however, it really is the recipe author's idiosyncratic style. Now, as to ...


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The way my parents always did it is to cut it up and then freeze it. Whenever you need some just take the box out, crumble a bit of the frozen parsley into whatever you need it for, then put the box back in the freezer. Obviously it won't be fresh, so I suggest you only cut the amount that you don't think you'll be able to use before it goes bad, and keep ...


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Chinese Parsley == Coriander [UK] == Cilantro [US] It will store for up to a week if it started crispy-fresh & you put it in the salad chiller in a fridge. Paper rather than plastic will prevent it 'sweating' [which will make it turn yellow or just rot with remarkable alacrity] but it will then dry out instead, so your gain may not be great. The best ...


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The most obvious visual guide would be to look at how the leaves are connected to the main stalk. Look at each joint where the stem is connected to the little branches (petiole?) to the leaves. for coriander, one leave per joint. But for flat parsley, you can see that at each joint, they branch out to a few more leaves, so it's more than one leave per joint. ...


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It certainly does make sense - adding herbs at the beginning of the process (not just parsley) gives them ample time to infuse their flavor into the stock. I regularly do so along with other herbs: rosemary, thyme, or whatever else is on hand. This is an optimal place to use up dried herbs (I'm fairly sure a lot of kitchens have a sad, half-used container ...


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Depending on how thick the stems are, they might get quite hard and taste "wooden". They also get more bitter the more you travel down the stem. So, don't be super picky when discarding stems, but don't be too generous either. I usually discard stems when they start to get somewhat rigid when you try to bend them. Here's an article I quickly found on the ...


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A typical French Bouquet Garni would indeed have parsley in it, added at the beginning of simmering time. It may be a sprig of thyme, a bay-leaf, and a small bunch of parsley tied up in a neat little package, rolled in a leaf of leek. When I'm making stock at home, I'm less sophisticated, and more frugal. I save everything I plan to use in a stock in a ...


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Absolutely add parsley in the beginning. I believe the French call it a bouquet when they tie many spices and herbs together or put them in a bag (bouquet garnet) and put them in the soup and in the end take it out. Myself I chop the parsley up once I make the stock from the chicken and add it when I add just a few veges (that's how my late Mama taught me) ...


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I would keep cut parsley in the refrigerator, either in a little water in a jar or in a plastic bag, similar to cut flowers that are preserved by refrigeration.


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In the US, coriander refers to ground coriander seeds, not coriander leaf. Its a brown powder. The seeds are spherical and slightly larger than peppercorns.


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I like the comment from @DaveVoutila best. I don't use a paper bag, though - just paper towels. The herbs will eventually wilt, but they'll still be fine for soups, stocks, etc. In fact, in time, they'll become rather similar to dried herbs.


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