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63

Poorly. Pasta doesn't absorb all that much flavor from spices in the water, other than maybe salt (and even then you must add excessive amounts of salt to make the resulting pasta evidently salty.) Add spices to whatever sauce you pour on the pasta, otherwise you're wasting like 90% of them. An alternative would be kneading the spices into the pasta dough. ...


39

As stated in another answer, Italian tradition is that all pasta is cooked in boiling water. A reasonable explanation for this usage is that it's easier to get the time right this way. Pasta is very sensitive to cooking time, and will easily turn from 'al dente' to an overcooked mush if left on the fire a couple of minutes too much. By cooking it in ...


32

For dried pasta it doesn’t really matter if you start with cold or hot water, as most of the time pasta spends in water is for hydration. And once the hydrated starches reach a certain temperature they gelatinize, thus cooking the pasta. When you start with cold water, you should use less water, which is actually a plus... Note: I forgot to mention, you ...


31

Advantages: You can make pasta in your water boiler. Disadvantages: Hard to clean. Waste of energy, a water boiler is on or off, it will expend full energy keeping the water boiling. Incredibly dangerous, a big fire hazard. Because it's modified to ignore the internal temperature sensor it will keep heating and heating even if all the water is vaporized. ...


30

One important fact to note here is that many spices are oils or oil-soluble. Pepper, for example, will dissolve effectively in oil, and thus the flavor of pepper can be imparted into other things thereby; however, if you attempt to dissolve it in water, you'll mostly end up with the pepper just staying in the peppercorn (if whole or large pieces) or ...


29

According to the CONSORZIO DEL PESTO GENOVESE, which defines what is considered official Pesto Genovese, it does contain garlic. They suggest that traditionally it contained less garlic than the current official recipe calls for - one clove for 600g of pasta versus two. Later on they mention that it contains one clove for each thirty leaves of basil, and ...


13

Tomato Sauce Putanesca Pesto (omit parmesan) Bolognese (meat sauce) Squash Puree (maybe with sage) Olive oil infusions (fresh herb/garlic/chilis/lemon zest) Roasted Red Pepper puree sauce etc


12

No, it has nothing to do with the acidity of your sauce. It took a lot longer to cook because of the prevalent temperature throughout the pan, and the mass of the material being heated. Sauce + Noodles is a lot to heat up, a lot more than just a pot of water. It's also unlikely you fully boiled the Sauce + Noodles as you would have with water (to a full ...


11

If you're going to reheat pasta, microwaving is a good way. Adding a few drops of water and covering helps the texture if it doesn't have sauce already on it. You can actually do something close to a stir fry - heat some oil and use it to cook tasty ingredients (onions, garlic, herbs, spices) and then stir in the pasta (and things like olives or sweetcorn ...


11

Advantages: you free up one burner in your stovetop, and one pot Disadvantages: you might damage your equipment in the long term (starch might get in places where it shouldn't, and metallic parts will get damaged by the salt) you can't boil clean water in that boiler anymore (I doubt it will be easy to clean) if it doesn't have a temperature control, it ...


10

Traditionally, you start with a layer of pasta at the bottom, then go ragu-bechamel-lasagne-ragu-bechamel-lasagne, and finish with a layer of bechamel directly on top of the last pasta layer, followed by a liberal covering of grated parmesan. It is also common to add a sprinkling of parmesan on top of the bechamel in each layer. Ratios are subjective but ...


10

While Italian cuisine is defined regionally, the majority of Italian pasta dishes have one cook the pasta until almost done, then finish in the condiment. While there are exceptions that include thick, long cooked sauces like Bolognese or sugos, finishing in the condiment serves several purposes: (a) the pasta and the condiment can be combined, (b) the pasta ...


10

That will work only for water-soluble spices, and you will still end up pouring a lot of spices away with the water. I once took a cooking class with Bavarian chef Alfons Schuhbeck, and his recommendations were: Always oversalt pasta water, as this is the only way of getting flavor into the pasta. (Which implies most of the salt is poured away with the ...


9

Uncooked pasta (fresh, partly dried or fully dried) needs to be boiled in water because it needs to absorb water in order to become soft. Pasta which has already been fully cooked, ready to eat, and then cooled down (i.e. leftovers) already contains enough water. So it can be reheated in any way you like. However, microwaving pasta leftovers without a sauce ...


9

Pasta can be made from many types of flour. Often, this is predicated on style of pasta or the dish. 100% AP flour will be just fine for your ravioli. I use it often when making fresh pasta. Substituting the AP flour for the semolina might impact the hydration. I would hold off on the water at first. If the dough feels too dry, add water a tablespoon ...


8

I make a lot of pasta; I can tell by looking that your dough is just too moist to cut. Take the water out and just incorporate the egg in the dough more slowly, allow it to become a 'shaggy mess' while you mix it - don't add more moisture, just keep kneading, it'll hydrate evenly and turn into a well-behaved ball. I'm guessing you got to the 'mess' part and ...


8

There are very few pasta sauces recipe that actually uses cheese or milk products in their recipes. The ones that use cheese are easy to spot (caccio e pepe, carbonara...) so don't do them. You could use lactose free cheese or milk or cream. Remember that real Parmesan contain very little to no lactose. To add to other suggestions, have a look at any ...


7

Yes, as a chemist i can assure you that whatever chemicals are in the water would tend to get absorbed into the pasta. In general the public is lousy at assessing risks. Did you drive to store to buy the pasta? You're at a more significant risk of a car accident than a serious problem from chloramines.


7

Like MaxW said, it's starchy water. This happens because Pasta is made from flour, water, and sometimes egg—that means it’s basically just starch and protein rolled out into different shapes and dried. It’s the starch molecules that are important. Once they’re heated in a moist environment—like your pot of water—the starch will absorb more and more ...


7

It depends on the pasta shape: There are times when you do want to start with a large pot of already-boiling water. The first is when cooking fresh pasta. Because fresh pasta is made with eggs, if you don't start it in boiling water, it won't set properly, causing it to turn mushy or worse, disintegrate as it cooks. The second exception is ...


7

One very likely explanation: did you start your pasta in cold water? These times are given for pasta that gets immersed in a very large amount of already-boiling water. If you either started from cold, or had a rather crowded pot of pasta (such that the water cooled down when the pasta was added), then the time needed will increase. For me personally, ...


6

You can not prevent your pasta from overcooking but you can make it more mushy (and unpalatable) The effect of acidity is very noticeable with potatoes, adding a shot of vinegar will let you cook almost paper-thin slices without them falling apart, while adding soda does the opposite. This article goes in detail and has close-up images of the results I ...


6

All the Chinese noodles that I have ever cooked were made from salted dough, while Italian dried pasta was made from unsalted dough. Hence the difference in cooking methods. As per Wikipedia: Unlike many Western noodles and pastas, Chinese noodles made from wheat flour are usually made from salted dough and therefore do not require the addition of salt ...


6

It's usually fine to keep the pasta in an open container. But there are two potential issues: First, if you live somewhere with a very humid climate, the pasta could get unpleasant after many months of storage. Second, you'll be surprised what weevils like to eat! Keeping anything with even a small amount of starch sealed away makes sure that, if you happen ...


6

There are several phases meat goes through when simmering - a better-educated chef than myself could probably give them all names, but with no formal education, this is what I've noticed over the years. If you're going to cook mince for a long time in a sauce, you'll not be interested in the first one - that's more for a burger. When first fried until a ...


6

You may just be cooking too much at once. When I make lasagna or rolled pasta, like cannelloni, I cook 2 to 3 sheets at a time, building my lasagna (or filling the pasta) as I go. I remove the cooked sheets to a clean kitchen towel. Proceed with the construction when they are just cool enough to handle, then add more fresh pasta to the cooking pot.


5

Layer them between wax paper, parchment paper or microwave cling film.


5

Obviously those figures can only be a guideline. There's a good measure of subjectivity to pasta cooking, but most likely the package directions are not totally random, and you should be getting pretty close to a good state if you were following them to the letter. Still, the real method to tell whether your pasta is cooked is to taste it, not time it. ...


5

Airtight containers are unnecessary for dry pasta Dry pasta, that is fully dried does not require airtight packaging. In the U.S. dried pasta products are typically packaged in unlined cardboard boxes which are not airtight and are marked to be used within 3 years of the packing date. Freshly made, uncooked pasta however is not fully dried and should be ...


5

It's not traditional to add cheese to fish dishes in much of Italian cuisine. Historically, this may be more closely connected to economics and religious beliefs than for any culinary reason. As far as flavor development goes, if you like parmesean cheese with your fish based pasta dishes, by all means, use it. Getting the cheese to emulsify into the sauce ...


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