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32

You don't need raw milk (or more precisely, raw cream). I've made butter from cream many times, but never from unpasteurized cream -- I prefer locally sourced organic cream for reasons, but the actual butter-making process is exactly the same with a pint of store-bought. If you are starting from milk rather than from cream, you will need to get non-...


9

Pasteurization is the process of heating food to kill pathogenic bacteria, rendering it safe to eat. Pasteurization is a function of temperature and time. Using sous vide, one could easily have a pasteurized rare steak, or even a "raw" egg. So, yes...pasteurized food is able to be consumed more safely by people who are immunocompromised or pregnant. These ...


8

Even if it is possible, it is a very, very bad idea as you don't know what cultures or pathogens are in the already spoiled milk. Fermented dairy products should only be made from fresh milk in good condition—and in most cases, that milk should be pasteurized while fresh absolutely as soon as possible from the source cows.


8

The process of pasteurizing milk is to treat it with heat to kill microorganisms such as Brucella, Campylobacter, E. coli O157:H7, Listeria, Mycobacterium bovis, Salmonella, and Yersinia that may or may not be in the milk. This is a precautionary step that is taken when you are not 100% sure whether your source of milk is disease free. Pasteurization can ...


6

They also said to wait for the cream to separate from the milk. I've never seen this happen - is there something about pasteurisation that stabilises the emulsion? No. When I was a child, we had pasteurized full-fat milk delivered in bottles to our doorstep, and there was always a separated layer of cream on the top. It's homogenization that prevents the ...


6

You ain't going to get anything like that into the states legally - not with the chance of livestock still being viable in there. It doesn't need pasteurising,it needs paralyzing before it will get past US customs. You might get some included as a component of a cooked product, if the paperwork assures customs it doesn't actually cause death. If you want a ...


5

Pasteurisation is about using heat to kill (harmful) bacteria in raw products. The short answer is 'Yes, you can'. The question is how, or how long should you heat the milk. A quick look at the Wikipedia provides some answers. In the HTST process, milk is forced between metal plates or through pipes heated on the outside by hot water, and is heated to 71....


5

In principle, I don't see why you couldn't take the flour to safe temperatures just like any other food. You'd have to reach temperatures which break down proteins, something like 165 F or 75 C should be sufficient (it's good enough for meat). This will break down the proteins in the flour too, so I would expect it to behave like standard browned flour (...


4

According to the US FDA, normal pastuerization for fruit juice would be 160F for 6 seconds. This should be easily accomplished in a hot water bath; just heat up the water to 160f, and dip the bottles. However, a fermented sauce made with chopped peppers has poor circulation compared to fruit juice, and you are heating bottles rather than passing the liquid ...


4

The lower bound seems to be at 2 to 4 days in the fridge. The upper bound is probably at 7 to 10 days in the fridge at less than 4°C (32 F) 1 1 Source: Swiss journal about poultry farming. This information refers to the storage of whole eggs. Two sentences before, the text says that cracked eggs stored at 4°C must be cooked within 48 hours to be conformable ...


4

A simpler option (recommended by the FDA food safety website) is to use a cooked egg base: Combine eggs and half the milk as indicated in the recipe. (Other ingredients, such as sugar may be added at this step.) Cook the mixture gently to an internal temperature of 160 °F, stirring constantly. The cooking will destroy Salmonella, if present. At this ...


4

The issue with the "danger zone" has to do with bacteria that are on the food. There are 2 issues. fresh food may have harmful bacteria on it. This is more likely by meat, but vegetables can have them too (this is why you wash off that apple before you eat it) Getting up to 140 degrees kills off everything. any bacteria that there is on it or lands on it ...


4

Looking at the photos in the webshop it's pretty clear to me that you're still supposed to bag whatever food goes in it. It will make clean up of the machine easier and you don't want blood residues on it for your next batch of food. Perhaps you don't need to vacuum seal it, just squeeze out as much air as possible with the vacuum displacement method and ...


3

Probiotic products are generally pasteurised, then the desirable cultures are introduced, in a similar way to yoghurt. There may be exceptions but those you can find in the supermarket are all made this way. There are several reasons. Shelf life is a fairly minor one, but a batch contaminated with a disease-causing species would be a problem not just for ...


3

I recently ran across this interesting article about using a sous vide to make safe-to-eat raw cookie dough. According to the article, flour needs to be brought to 160 F to make it safe for raw consumption. She uses her sous vide to do this though admits it takes a really long time for the flour to come to temperature (four hours). She links to another ...


3

It depends on what is to be pasteurized. If one aims for pasteurizing the surface only, then the shape is more or less unimportant. If however one wants to pasteurize the core, then the shape will affect the times. To be on the safe size, measure the thickness where the meat is thickest. Myhrwold writes in http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?/topic/116617-...


3

The reason I now scald my milk when making pies, custard and quiches: (I hope I can express this correctly) It isn't just about thickening the liquid or a jump start. I now scald my milk 20 to 30 minutes at 185 degrees F. I use a candy thermometer gently stirring all the while. This scalding process has made all the difference in my pies, custard and quiches....


3

Here's an answer from the FDA website for pasteurizing whole eggs: Egg pasteurization uses a water bath and motion to ensure that whole eggs are pasteurized without cooking the eggs. Egg whites coagulate at 140 °F. Therefore, heating an egg above 140 °F would cook the egg, so processors pasteurize the egg in the shell at 130 °F for 45 minutes.


3

Not THE answer, but: A state-by-state map of raw milk laws in the United States


2

Pasteurization to make it shelf stable is simple. Just heat the mixture stirring constantly at 180F for 10 minutes, then immediately bottle in sterilized containers. This stops the fermentation and minimizes any chance that your sauce could ever make anyone sick, assuming you fermented it long enough to get down to something like 4.0 acidity on your ph ...


2

I was under the impression based on what I saw on Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern that it is not available outside the area where it is produced, let alone outside of the EU.


1

It is safer and helps increase the shelf life of the milk. Otherwise the milk will pass through dangerous temperatures and and may be recolonized with air born pathogens. These will grow rapidly during the period the milk is warm, and more slowly once it is refrigerated. While the milk may not become immediately unsafe or unpalatable, its storage ...


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