We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

Hot answers tagged

54

It is less useful than what you think Frame challenge incoming... Cling film is very light and made especially for such purposes. The environmental damage is extremely low - which limits what alternatives you can choose. Most alternatives (including those already mentioned in the other answers) will be so much more resource demanding to make, dispose or ...


18

Technically, this is not precisely buttermilk, but it's pretty close in both composition and usage. The term "buttermilk" can actually refer to a wide range of fermented milk varieties. Traditionally, buttermilk was produced by allowing natural bacteria present in cream to ferment some of the sugar lactose into lactic acid. This made churning butter from ...


16

1- To work with phyllo or yufka sheets the key is to keep them from drying out. A damp, but not dripping, towel laid over the sheets is essential. Cover it after each time you take out a sheet. They dry out very fast and then just disintegrate. 2- The butter should be melted but not hot. Many recipes call for it to be clarified as well but I don't ...


16

Croissant purists state 32 is the "perfect" number of layers a croissant should have. In this link seeking the croissant perfection, you can find: NOTE11, I had the misconception that the more folds, the more layers, the flakier it will be. Wrong. With too many folds, butter layers would be thinner and thinner, and it will be more likely for the butter ...


13

You have gotten a fundamental principle of the choux pastry wrong. The rising and airiness is not caused by beating air bubbles into the batter, unlike with sponge cake and similar, but by trapping steam in the well formed network of gluten and egg in the batter. The cooking step is not meant to just have the flour-water-fat mix come together, but to have ...


11

You don't have to use clingfilm (cling wrap, saran wrap depending where you are in the world), there are alternatives as long as the pastry is not sticky: Plastic bags: I reuse zippable plastic bags as many times as I can, you can wash them by turning them inside out Baking paper: baking paper can be re-used as long as it stays clean Aluminum foil: again ...


10

Flakiness in pastry is usually achieved by careful incorporation of butter at the correct temperature. Cold cubes of butter are cut into the flour, cold water (or milk) is added, and then the pastry is rolled out, flattening the butter pieces. These pieces act to separate layers of the flour and liquid mixture. The butter then melts during cooking, 'setting'...


9

This is because you are using a microwave. In theory, if you could turn off the microwaves in the microwave oven, you could use the convection function to bake things. In practice, we have had several questions which indicate that this is not how convection microwaves work. They keep nuking your dough, making it inedible. In your case, they are cooking all ...


9

While many bread and pastry products do depend critically on the formation and management of gluten from wheat flours, this is not universally true. Some types of pastry have structure dependent more on the starch networks which is the other major component of wheat flours; the texture and properties of these pastries is often dependent on the gross ...


9

"Atomized glucose" seems to be primarily a French product, derived from spray-drying glucose syrup. Glucose syrup is best known in America as corn syrup (e.g. light Karo, not HFCS), and is mostly, but not entirely, glucose. Dextrose is pure crystalline glucose. They are not exactly the same ingredient, and probably not interchangeable in fussy recipes.


9

That is totally doable. Just print out an appropriately sized copy of the desired picture and put a piece of waxed paper over it. Using a piping bag, trace the picture with frosting, filling it in. Then freeze the frosting and waxed paper. Once it is frozen, peel away the waxed paper, and put the pieces on the cake. Here is a great pictorial of the process.


8

With great skill, a true artist could do what you describe with Thai/Vietnamese rice paper, the dinner plate sized, extra thin ones, like for Fresh Spring Rolls. I will never apply for the job, I promise.


8

I respect Jolenealaska's creative thought, but nothing truly resembling pastry is going to be translucent or transparent unless it is exceedingly thin. The structure alone will refract light, making the product opaque in the same way snow is opaque even though individual water crystals are fairly transparent, if they don't have air inclusions. This is ...


8

Dextrose is one of the two stereoisomers of glucose, also known as D-glucose. The other is L-glucose. The two isomers are exactly the same except for being mirror images of one another. In cooking, all glucose you encounter is going to be dextrose as that's the form that terrestrial life is able to produce and metabolize. (A few unusual bacteria can ...


8

If your dough is very dry and crumbly, it needs more water. Add a few mL to the dough when adding the beaten egg.


7

I am afraid that it is quite hard to prepare it yourself. And you don't start from phylo dough. Kataifi is not shredded, it is spun. You need a hot metal wheel for that. It is made from a batter which is thrown on the wheel, and because the wheel is spun, it bakes on the wheel in threads. You need not only the instruments (this wheel), but also quite a bit ...


7

Baklava truly is the dessert of the gods. One of my favorites! And a real treat for many people who are used to desserts that simply compete with one another to be as fatty and as sweet as possible, with as many different "types" of chocolate as can be reasonably crammed in. The rich flavor of nuts and the floral sweetness of honey and rose water can be a ...


7

This is an answer to the "how to make it faster" portion of your question. Here's how you make it, quick, easy, and 99% as good as if you'd spent an hour painting each phyllo sheet using a brush made with magical unicorn tail hair. Take half the phyllo and place on baking sheet Spread nuts/sugar/cinnamon on top Take other half phyllo and cover the nuts/...


7

Yeah, how about biscuit dough? That's a common way to do a quick and easy chicken pot pie. It might be a little tricky to actually enclose the curry in the biscuit dough, but it should be doable. For reference, here are a couple of "pot pie" recipes that use biscuit dough on top of the filling: Add a Pinch (from scratch) Bisquick (Using Bisquick brand) ...


7

Many filled doughs don't require long resting times (maybe 30min to an hour), but they generally do require a little bit if kneading to make sure they're sturdy enough to hold a filling. If you have a stand mixer or a food processor, you likely won't need to do any hand-kneading. I'd recommend looking at recipes for either empenadas or samosas. (Look for ...


7

Flour (+ water, either directly or from other ingredients such as egg white) gives the pastry structure. As you knead the flour, the gluten network develops and results in elasticity. When cooked, water evaporates from the dough leaving a rigid gluten skeleton. Fat does not mix with water and thus stay in blobs in between the gluten network. This weakens ...


7

Absolutely not. As the other poster said but I will say with no "I think", I will say I know it will ruin the pastry. You will end up with a gummy crust that will never give you the flaky texture that pie doughs are famous for. It would probably also leave you with a somewhat dry filling as much of the liquid would then be in the crust.


6

This is not necessarily under baked. What you made is a perfect creme puff. The dough in the middle is not raw- it has just been steamed from the inside instead of being dried and crisped the way the exterior was. There is usually very little such dough on the inside and the filling hides it. Many creme puff recipes call for scooping out the soft dough ...


6

If you are only proofing your shaped croissants for 40mins, that could be your problem. Proofing croissants takes a lot longer than proofing bread. you should be proofing the shaped croissants at 78degreesF/25~26degreesC for 2-2.5hours at HIGH humidity. If you don't have a high humid environment, then put one coat of egg wash on right away before you ...


6

Those are Pan Pistacchio - this blog entry (not mine) has a picture of a sign in a shop window identifying them. It goes on to say that the general category of these buns is Fishermans Buns or Pan del Pescatore and that the green ones specifically are pistachio, which matches what I saw in Venice myself - the pistachio ones were always green and there were ...


6

A few points to consider... Try docking the pastry. Docking means to pierce lightly with a fork, or a docker (looks like a spiked paint roller), to make small holes in dough that will let steam escape during baking. This helps the dough to remain flat and even. ref: http://powerhungry.com/2009/02/puff-pastry-docking/ In general, to cook food more evenly,...


6

If you want the least obtrusive flavor, the best you can go with is thickened water. While you can probably prepare sheets with the right hydrocolloid and lots of care and plastic foil, I would suggest choosing a thickener which thickens on cooling, and pouring the warm mixture over the pie. Arrowroot starch is frequently used in this role on fruit pies, I ...


6

The answer to this question is essentially the same as the question "how do you make croissants". If you are making croissants du boulanger, the dough has yeast in it; if you are making croissants du pattissier, the dough does not have yeast in it. The fact that croissants can be made without yeast shows that the yeast itself is not essential to the oven ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible