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27

You'd end up with something somewhere between unleavened bread, pasta & laminate flooring, depending on what else you did with it. The first two are what you'd get if that's how you treated them, the last is what you'd get if you thought you were going to get shortcrust pastry ;) Late edit This started out as one of my more flippant short answers, but ...


20

No. An edible organic liquid that does not dissolve in water, almost by definition, is an oil. That's not the important thing, though. Substances like mineral oil are edible yet non-nutritive; they pass through the body unchanged and would be compatible with any dietary condition. The problem is that, because they are not digestible and not water-soluble, ...


9

Your title mentions oil but your question mentions shortening. Be aware that oil and shortening are not the same thing, and substituting one for the other will change the results. Oil is fat that is liquid at room temperature; shortening is fat that is solid at room temperature (but usually not butter; if a recipe wants butter it will call for it by name). ...


8

You still need some gluten, otherwise the cake will crumble. Any recipe that is gluten free has to use a number of different additives to mimic the structure provided by the gluten. If you just replaced the flour with cornstarch, your cake or pastry would not be able to rise (it would lack the internal structure to "inflate") and likely crumble as ...


6

This is almost certainly Brioche con Gelato, which is Brioche, a sweet and rich bread with gelato a rich ice-cream made with whole milk and sugar.


6

This sort of pastry is known as short pastry, although it has variants (e.g. you can make flaky piecrust with these ingredients). It is mandatory that you make it with some form of solid fat, the only leeway you have is that you can use lard or butter instead of shortening, other fats such as coconut oil may already require advanced techniques. You also have ...


5

Yes. Yes it does. Unfortunately, I did something similar once, and it basically gave my pastry cream the consistency of creme anglaise. It made a delicious ice cream base, but failed as a cream puff filling. My best explanation is that the blender destroyed the protein structure of the partially cooked egg, but my attempts to look into it in the past haven't ...


5

That's an unusual problem, rollable pie crust recipes will in my experience always get hard enough in the fridge and actually too hard/brittle after a full night there. Troubleshooting should go in the following order: Make sure you are using a recipe that was designed to be rolled. Pressing is a legitimate way of making a pie crust, and maybe you had a ...


4

In my personal experience, adding eggs to dough makes it softer, not crunchier. Adding an egg makes it an "enriched dough" that has the ability to hold onto moisture despite being baked. Many apple strudel dough recipes include an egg or two in the dough, so you should just go for it. Finally, while strudel dough is very similar to filo, it is not ...


4

What you’re proposing to make is the start of what’s known as ‘hard tack’ although it usually has some salt in it, too It’s a way to make flour shelf stable for a longer period so it could be used as army or ship rations. The dough was rolled out, docked, and then cooked in.a low oven and then left out to dry thoroughly so it couldn’t mold To eat it, you ...


3

If the matcha powder has been adequately mixed/stirred in, it should pass through the strainer - on the other hand, if straining/filtering is not in the source recipe, perhaps you should concentrate on mixing throughly so that there are no lumps, and not strain. As an additional possibility for weak flavor: I'm always willing to guess (when things don't seem ...


2

So first things first, a short crust pie dough is usually made with cold butter and ice water. This leads to a flakier, more tender dough. You also typically don't want to knead the dough. Too much gluten development leads to a tough, chewy crust. A more typical shortcrust would start with cold butter cut into cubes. Put the flour, salt, and butter in a food ...


2

There’s nothing special about the mods, they are just various kinds of spherical molds. I am quite sure that the different materials has to do with different use cases (some have to be oven proof, others not), but probably more with what manufacturer offered which diameter. If the chef is aiming for a specific layer thickness, they’ll have to find the ...


2

I think adding the matcha at step 4 makes good sense, not step 5. Matcha flavor is best extracted in the range between 75-80°C, any higher than that and you can damage the flavor, but a lot less than that and you won't extract the flavor from the powder effectively. Adding matcha to boiling milk isn't a great idea, but adding it after the chocolate has ...


2

I am afraid that you will never know the answer. At least, from your description, there is no obvious cause for failure, and there is just no way to guess what exactly went wrong this one time. The recipe and your process seem fine and should work in principle. Typical causes can be: You didn't wait enough. You say you only waited for 90 minutes - yeast ...


2

I'm sure you can obtain something interesting, but nothing can replace an oven for the puff pastry to cook correctly and uniformly. So even if you manage to get it cooked, the consistency won't be the same.


1

While it is possible to add an egg, it isn't a very promising idea. If what you like about phylo pastry is its traditional texture, then the easiest way to get it is to use the tried-and-known methods to make it, instead of doing random experiments. So first about the egg: the yolk would be a no-go, it will make the pastry softer and less crunchy. Adding an ...


1

I would say that the effects will be too minimal to notice. So if you want to do it, go ahead and use up your egg whites. Theoretically, egg yolks provide some emulsifying powers, and lead to softer, richer, sometimes even slimier doughs, while egg whites increase binding more and give you drier doughs. This can be quite noticeable in egg-rich cake types ...


1

I would say that the "thicker milk" advice of the other answer is not bad. Instead of using evaporated milk, it might be mich easier to make it with powdered milk. Beyond that, I wouldn't try to do whatever a commercial producer is doing. Their recipes tend to be very precisely tuned, created with a lot of effort and know-how, and require steps and ...


1

I'm not sure how brittle your recipe is, but if it has a little bit of plasticity, I would try scissors. They will likely produce better cuts. If it is not scissor friendly, a sharp pizza wheel might also do better than a knife. If you do use a knife, sawing should be better than pressing, less chance of it spluttering under the knife.


1

I find that it's easiest to cut fragile, hard things with a serrated knife. I would go with a bread knife and slowly saw though it. In the future, I would recommend waiting until they're slightly set but still warm and cut then instead of waiting until it's completely cooled.


1

I don't think you can lower the melting point without melting the chocolate first. Butter is very soft at room temperature and adds it's own typical butter flavor. A better alternative is hard coconut fat. I always use this trick when I cover a cake with a simple chocolate glaze. If you simply melt the chocolate and slather it on top of the cake, it becomes ...


1

Here is a discussion on Jam to Pate de Fruit? at eGullet Forums. Question posted by pastryani: Is it possible to make PDF from jam or jelly? Jam is essentially a more fluid version of PDF, so I would think that I could either (1) boil off extra liquid from the jam until it's thicker, or (2) warm the jam and add a bit of pectin to it to thicken it. If I ...


1

It could be that his posted amounts of liquid are incorrect. When looking up various croissant recipes online, I see ranges of 280 grams of liquid (the lowest I found) to 360 grams for 500 grams of flour. ...and that is just with some cursory searching. His indicates 250 grams, and while that is a small difference between his and the "driest" ...


1

How does this method work? In a hot water crust, when the high temperature of the water and fat emulsion is combined with flour the hot liquid causes some of the starch to gelatinize and swell with water which makes less liquid available to form gluten. This lack of gluten results in a tender pie crust that might be better described as "mealy" when ...


1

I have never heard of anybody trying that, but beeswax may fulfill the role butter usually has in puff pastry. According to wikipedia and my own experience, "beeswax is edible, having similar negligible toxicity to plant waxes, and is approved for food use in most countries." This page suggests to use it instead of oil or butter to grease cookie ...


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