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4

What you’re proposing to make is the start of what’s known as ‘hard tack’ although it usually has some salt in it, too It’s a way to make flour shelf stable for a longer period so it could be used as army or ship rations. The dough was rolled out, docked, and then cooked in.a low oven and then left out to dry thoroughly so it couldn’t mold To eat it, you ...


9

Your title mentions oil but your question mentions shortening. Be aware that oil and shortening are not the same thing, and substituting one for the other will change the results. Oil is fat that is liquid at room temperature; shortening is fat that is solid at room temperature (but usually not butter; if a recipe wants butter it will call for it by name). ...


6

This sort of pastry is known as short pastry, although it has variants (e.g. you can make flaky piecrust with these ingredients). It is mandatory that you make it with some form of solid fat, the only leeway you have is that you can use lard or butter instead of shortening, other fats such as coconut oil may already require advanced techniques. You also have ...


27

You'd end up with something somewhere between unleavened bread, pasta & laminate flooring, depending on what else you did with it. The first two are what you'd get if that's how you treated them, the last is what you'd get if you thought you were going to get shortcrust pastry ;) Late edit This started out as one of my more flippant short answers, but ...


5

Yes. Yes it does. Unfortunately, I did something similar once, and it basically gave my pastry cream the consistency of creme anglaise. It made a delicious ice cream base, but failed as a cream puff filling. My best explanation is that the blender destroyed the protein structure of the partially cooked egg, but my attempts to look into it in the past haven't ...


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