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56

From this link The key to slicing and portioning foie is to treat it like a rich mousse-cake: Make sure to heat up your knife under running water in between every slice. A cold knife will catch and stick in the foie, causing it to tear or crumble. A hot knife will melt the fat as it goes through, leaving you with clean, smooth surfaces to sear.


15

I think it helps the knife to pass through the foie gras quickly without anything sticking to the surface of the knife blade, making for cleaner cuts. Enjoying foie gras


4

There are plenty of high-sugar-content sweets that use gelatine, so it would be a reasonable substitute, but won't match the texture that pectin would normally provide in a pate de fruit or jam. I don't know of any recipes using agar-agar that are designed for long-term storage, it is more often used in desserts, and again has a very distinctive (slightly ...


3

Hello @janos and welcome to Seasoned Advice! The first thing that comes to mind would be to first wrap your food items tightly in plastic wrap and then vacuum seal them. However, if you open and close them frequently that could be a pain. But, if you on are only keeping the items 2 - 3 days, it could work. That said, plastic can absorb odors and allow them ...


3

Actually, it sounds like everything went right to me, that's a classic terrine. You simply picked the wrong recipe if you don't want fat - 1/4 of it is lard after all. When you cooked it the fat melted and got squeezed out to the sides, that's perfectly normal. If you want less fat then replace fat with gelatine which will solidify to hold it all together.


3

I've used a small loaf pan as a pate mold, worked just fine. I don't see any reason really not to use one as long as the size is good for what you intend. I don't like the plastic wrap idea, I'm not interested in cooking with plastic in a high temp environment. With sous vide you know that temps aren't going to get above a certain temp but in the oven I'm ...


3

Raw garlic isn't to everyone's taste so should be cooked. The flavour of rosemary is also best cooked, or even infused and removed as it can be rather dominant if you find a big bit. You may want to be gentle with the rosemary the first time. I assume you're poaching or steaming the fish. Lemon and parsley are usually added raw. Black pepper can be used ...


2

The simple problem is that you need to warm up the fats sufficiently for it to spread. The same holds true for many other fatty spreads, like chevé or neufchâtel. You can get around this somewhat with two tricks: Place the knife you're going to be using to cut the pâté in a cup of hot water for a minute or two before slicing. Dry it off, then slice in. ...


1

Assuming it’s chicken liver pate, have you tried adding butter, cream or other saturated fat? This can thicken and so firm pate quite well. Or you could use some kind of meal - oat flour or matzo meal, breadcrumbs etc that would absorb the liquid. Difficult to know without the recipe - many use mushrooms but I find livers, leeks and herbs and spice plus ...


1

I looked at five recipes, none of them called for the foie gras to be chopped. You have already cleaned the liver, and have a different method chosen to form the ballotines, but I really liked these instructional photos from The Renaissance Girl Cooks describing the method from The Squire (a restaurant with two Michelin stars), and thought that later users ...


1

Terrines almost always shrink. The water in the ingredients evaporates out, so the volume reduces - there's nothing you can do about that. However, not filling the mould will have exacerbated the problem. All terrine recipes are careful to state that the mould should be filled - yours even says to mound it slightly. It also says to use caul fat to help it ...


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