45

There's definitely some rounding going on because the peanut butter has 100.1g of nutrients per 100g of product. This isn't enough to explain the discrepancy. Adding up the nutrients on the roasted peanuts gives 95.4g. I think we can assume the other 4.6% is water. So perhaps more water has been driven off the peanut butter. What I think is more likely (...


24

I've done this with almond butter, and I imagine it would work for peanut butter as well. The secret is to buy it a month or so before you need it, and then store it upside down for a week, so the oil traverses all the way through the jar and its contents, then turn it right way up for another week, and repeat again in each direction. Each trip through the ...


24

What you can see in the jar is peanut oil, which has separated and floats on top. It means, you have bought a non-homogenized product, possibly an "all-natural" or "organic" product. Just stir the oil into the thick paste at the bottom and use as usual. For a discussion on how to best achieve this, see What's the most effective way to mix a jar of natural ...


19

Yes, this was always a problem for me. Stirring doesn't work because the oil spills out and its very hard to stir the bottom. The trick is to cut the peanut butter instead of stirring it. I can adequately mix a jar of peanut butter in less than 30 seconds without much effort and no mess this way. Using a butter knife, cut # shapes in the peanut butter over ...


18

If you add all the liquids and a big solid lump of peanut butter, you'll have a tough time getting it all smooth, as stirring the (thin) liquid parts won't affect the (solid) peanut butter lumps, and the lumps (once they're small enough) will just swim around your spoon and not break down further. You need to gradually dilute the peanut butter with the ...


15

The problem is the fat. You would have the same problem with a spoon full of shortening. Since fat doesn't normally mix with water the fat makes a film that gets on everything. The solution to fat- or rather to make a solution of fat- you use soap. You are trying to wash away a very large quantity of fat so it takes a lot of soap. Instead, scrape the ...


12

I've done it before without problems. Even if they're peanut butter & jelly (something that's typically stored in the fridge), it has so much sugar in it that it's inhospitable to microbes. If you want to play it extra safe, and the sandiwiches won't be easten shortly after you leave, you could place them in the freezer and then let them thaw in your ...


11

My husband came up with the best solution ever for this. He drilled a hole in the lid of an empty jar them put 1 mixer blade from the hand mixer through the hole and voila great mixed peanut or almond butter. We now keep an extra lid with the other jars of peanut butter for next time.


11

In addition to actually adding unwanted species, you're also adding moisture to a food that's otherwise very low in water. This will change its ability to support the growth of mould and bacteria in the damp bits. If you polish off a jar in a few days and always eat the bit you previously got saliva on, I'm sure the risks will be vanishingly small. If you ...


10

My guess is that the peanut butter is 100% peanuts but not 100% of the peanuts are being used in it. That's like sea salt that is 100% from the Atlantic Ocean. It still contains a smaller amount of water (and consequently a larger amount of sodium) than the Atlantic Ocean does. Or 100% pure orange juice which fortunately omits the orange peels.


10

You cannot convert it, because they are two different ingredients. Peanut butter chips are pieces which stay whole when baked. They don't melt, just sit there so you can bite on them after the cookie is baked. Peanut butter is a creamy substance, and if you try to put it in a blondie, it will not form a chunk, it will become part of the dough, giving it ...


10

As long as the peanut paste at the bottom of the jar hasn't gone rancid, I'm pretty sure the bottom of the jar gets hardened and dry because the peanut solids have sunk to the bottom while the peanut oil has floated to the top, and as you use the peanut butter, a deficit of peanut oil develops at the bottom of the jar. I usually try to keep re-mixing the jar ...


9

The easiest solution that comes to mind would be to figure out how much you need for a sandwich, remove that from the jar, set it on the counter to come to room temp (or put it in the microwave for 10-15 seconds) and then spread it when it's warmed up. "Refrigerate after opening" doesn't mean that it must be in the fridge every second, though... so even if ...


8

I found my own solution. Grab a single spiral dough hook from a hand mixer and chuck it into a power drill (corded or cordless). Open the jar and, holding it securely, turn it slowly at first so that the spiral pushes the contents downward. Once the oil is incorporating, speed up the drill and work down into the center and all around the edges (take it ...


7

Depending on how much salt is on them, and how it's been applied, you might be able to knock some of it off, and effectively decant it: Place the peanuts into a hard-sided container at least twice the volume of the peanuts that you can seal tightly. Shake the peanuts. A lot. Not too hard, though, as the goal is to knock some of the salt off, not to smash ...


7

Roasting peanuts in a pan on a stove cooks them primarily via conduction (i.e., the surface of the peanuts touching the hot surface of the pan). Since peanuts are round, each part of the peanut must touch the pan for an equal amount of time during the cooking process to be evenly roasted. That's nearly impossible without something like a barrel roaster (...


7

Have you ever added liquid straight to tahini when making hummus? See this quote from Cook's Illustrated: 'You’d think that adding a liquid would thin tahini rather than thicken it. Why the opposite? Tahini is simply sesame-seed butter, made by grinding hulled sesame seeds into a paste. Much of its makeup is carbohydrates, and when a small amount of juice (...


5

Peanut butter mixers do a good job. The downside is that they are specific to the jar size. Witmer's makes a range of mixers based around the jar size/opening. You take off the lid, screw on the mixer and crank away until the peanut butter is smooth. Alternatively, you can use a rubber spatula to empty out the peanut butter into a bowl and user hand mixer (...


5

Use salt in the kadhai - about 300-400 gramms or more. Heat it, then add peanuts and roast until they smell for about 6-8 minutes on medium gas. Your peanuts will not burn as heat is transferred to all parts of the peanuts.


5

Remove all surface salt by quickly rinsing them and thoroughly drying them as fast as possible.


5

Presuming that the nutrient labels are accurate (for some value of "accurate"), I can think of two reasons for the difference. Nutrient labels are rounded very aggressively (as in, to the nearest multiple of 10). Thus, doing math on the numbers is likely to result in so much error propagation that any differences are meaningless. Peanut butter generally ...


5

There are at least a dozen varieties of peanuts. Some are better for whole peanuts and others for peanut butter. Possibly there are some nutritional differences between varieties. Also the preparation could come into play, dry roasting vs oil roasting.


5

Heat is helpful. I used to make a peanut butter/tabasco/soy sauce satay, and getting the parts to combine cold was practically impossible. Warming the peanut butter first softened it enough that I could beat the other liquids into it with a fork as I added them (and they're both water-based so won't mix very well with the oily peanut butter). A few ...


5

The answer I've found is waste paper—newspaper, junk mail, whatever I have handy in the recycling bin. As you've probably noticed, peanut butter doesn't wash off very well, but it does wipe off quite easily. The oil that makes it so hard to wash with water makes it slide right off with the right kind of friction. Of course you don't want to use anything ...


4

I have rinsed salted nuts well in water to remove the excessive salt and then dried in the oven. Since salted nuts are already roasted, they don't "roast again" very well at all (or in general behave like raw peanuts when cooked) but you can certainly rinse to remove excess salt and dry at low temperatures. If you want to just eat them immediately you can ...


4

The answer is mostly just "it's tradition", as with most questions like this. I do think the pattern you've described isn't quite the actual one. What really happens is that we tend to eat peanut butter and jelly on sandwiches, and put one or the other on single slices of bread, because with a sandwich you can spread one thing on each half and put them ...


4

I've used the Witmer peanut butter mixers that djmadscribbler mentions. In my experience, they work OK up to a point but since the agitator is a rigid piece of metal that turns, it can't reach all the peanut butter in the jar and ultimately won't do as thorough a job mixing the peanut butter as you can manually with a butter knife. You'll end up with some ...


4

Experimenting with recipes is great, but on the first pass it is usually best to stay with exactly what the recipe says unless you are adjusting for altitude or another standard substitutions. In truth, it is why we usually look up recipes to begin with, to start with something others have found to be tried and true. I experiment and substitute all the ...


4

One solution is to make your own peanut butter. If you have peanuts (preferably roasted; if you have raw peanuts, toss them in the oven on a baking sheet in a single layer at around 350 F for about 10 minutes, maybe with a tbsp of peanut/vegetable/canola oil), throw them in a food processor or blender and let it rip. Scrape the sides of the bowl ...


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