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45

There's definitely some rounding going on because the peanut butter has 100.1g of nutrients per 100g of product. This isn't enough to explain the discrepancy. Adding up the nutrients on the roasted peanuts gives 95.4g. I think we can assume the other 4.6% is water. So perhaps more water has been driven off the peanut butter. What I think is more likely (...


13

Unshelled peanuts are salted simply by soaking in brine. Some of the salt (and water) gets through the shell, which is a bit porous. They're then re-dried and roasted. I suppose the roasting is optional, but if you're adding salt you clearly want flavor, and that's what roasting's for too. There's a Serious Eats post with a bit more detail if you're curious. ...


10

No, peanuts are not nuts in the botanical sense. They are legumes, much like peas or beans. Chestnuts and acorns are examples of true nuts. Most of what we commonly refer to as nuts are botanically drupes, including walnuts, almonds and cherries, as well as some larger fruits like peaches (which are typically eaten for their flesh, rather than their seed)....


10

My guess is that the peanut butter is 100% peanuts but not 100% of the peanuts are being used in it. That's like sea salt that is 100% from the Atlantic Ocean. It still contains a smaller amount of water (and consequently a larger amount of sodium) than the Atlantic Ocean does. Or 100% pure orange juice which fortunately omits the orange peels.


8

I don't think I've ever seen peanut butter grow mold, natural or commercial, refrigerated or not. What will happen with natural peanut butter is that the fat (of which there's plenty) will go rancid over time. The oxidation process that leads to rancidity requires heat, light, and usually oxygen; keeping it in the refrigerator will therefore slow the ...


8

That great taste comes from the compounds produced by the Maillard reaction. It not one reaction but many that occur when the building blocks of proteins and sugars react as food is heated. Many new compounds are produced giving the cooked food a richer range of flavors. The pyrazines produced by the Maillard reaction give roasted peanuts their ...


7

The previous answer which says to toast something means to brown it is accurate. The difference between roast and toast is simple, really: roast means to expose something to dry heat (in the west, usually in an oven) and to cook whatever it is right through; toast means to brown the outside of something, either held over a fire (as in marshmallows) or placed ...


7

Depending on how much salt is on them, and how it's been applied, you might be able to knock some of it off, and effectively decant it: Place the peanuts into a hard-sided container at least twice the volume of the peanuts that you can seal tightly. Shake the peanuts. A lot. Not too hard, though, as the goal is to knock some of the salt off, not to smash ...


7

Roasting peanuts in a pan on a stove cooks them primarily via conduction (i.e., the surface of the peanuts touching the hot surface of the pan). Since peanuts are round, each part of the peanut must touch the pan for an equal amount of time during the cooking process to be evenly roasted. That's nearly impossible without something like a barrel roaster (...


6

Alton Brown just generally prefers kosher salt, for reasons that don't really apply to peanut butter, which will be ground down anyway. What matters is the total weight of salt. Remember, kosher salt tends to weight approximately 1/2 as much (depending on brand) as table salt, per unit of volume. So you can replace the kosher salt with sea salt, or any ...


6

Per Pick your own (emphasis added): Store it in the refrigerator until you use it. It should keep for a month or two. You can also freeze it. It will keep indefinitely in the freezer. In both cases, you may need to stir the peanut butter to mix the oils back in (the oil tends to separate over time). And no, you cannot "can" the peanut butter - it is too ...


6

Nuts are much tastier when they are roasted. Dehydrating may be ok but it will not do the same thing for their flavor or texture. Nuts have a lot of oil but there is not enough on their exterior for powders to stick to. Of course some of the powder would stick anyway- and with parmesan even more would when the cheese melted. If you are ok with a milder ...


5

Properly stored, dry roasted nuts should lose none of their flavour. Keep them in a well sealed container and they will be fine. Spices, however, should be freshly toasted, because the point of doing so is to encourage them to release their flavourful oils.


5

Remove all surface salt by quickly rinsing them and thoroughly drying them as fast as possible.


5

Use salt in the kadhai - about 300-400 gramms or more. Heat it, then add peanuts and roast until they smell for about 6-8 minutes on medium gas. Your peanuts will not burn as heat is transferred to all parts of the peanuts.


5

Presuming that the nutrient labels are accurate (for some value of "accurate"), I can think of two reasons for the difference. Nutrient labels are rounded very aggressively (as in, to the nearest multiple of 10). Thus, doing math on the numbers is likely to result in so much error propagation that any differences are meaningless. Peanut butter generally ...


5

There are at least a dozen varieties of peanuts. Some are better for whole peanuts and others for peanut butter. Possibly there are some nutritional differences between varieties. Also the preparation could come into play, dry roasting vs oil roasting.


4

Well, you could shell out for a commercial nut butter mill, if you had an extra thousand bucks lying around. But otherwise the answer is probably not. I believe that commercial peanut butter makers grind the nuts between metal plates, which gives the very fine texture. At home, you're presumably using a food processor, which can't make thick-textured pastes ...


4

To toast something is to cause it to gain color through the application of heat. That's it. To toast a peanut is just like toasting a piece of bread. It can be done in the oven or on the stovetop, with or without oil. The difference between the words "roasting" and "toasting" is subtle and the words are often used interchangeably, but the true meanings aren'...


4

As @Carey Gregory already mentioned about McDonald's, I generally cook for 6-10 people and for small kitty and birthday parties, so for that I use a manual nut chopper (with size adjustment bolt). This gives me fine results of chopped nuts almost in equal shapes. For 2-5 servings, I simply use a sharp knife to chop them. I almost every time try to make them ...


4

I've made peanut butter cookies with various "all natural" peanut butters, containing no extra oil/fat, just peanuts and possibly salt. They didn't split. I suppose the recipe you're looking at could be somehow different but it seems really unlikely. I haven't even seen splitting in cooked sauces using these kinds of peanut butter, along with plenty of other ...


4

Put them in the microwave for about 30 seconds, they become oily, put in your spices and mix well, hey presto the seasoning sticks, let them cool!


4

You can most generally shell peanuts with your hands. There are different methods you can do depending on how sturdy the shells are. 1- If the shells are sturdy, hold each side of the neck (if you know what I mean) with each hand, and then break it apart. Now you have two shells with peanuts in them but there is a hole in each shell. Take one of them and ...


4

For sure, @TFD is correct that you should be wary of Wikihow - in the link you shared, the proportions of ingredients listed at the top don't appear to match the actual amounts of ingredients shown in the pictures. "Honey Roasted Peanuts" is a catch-all phrase that is used to describe just about any type roasted peanuts in a candy coating. The catch-all ...


4

Here's someone with a lot of experience doing it! video Dropping the peanuts into boiling water for a couple of minutes, then draining and rinsing in cold water is supposed to make them easier and quicker to peel. I've heard freezing them overnight helps. One method method that I have actually done is to peel them by rubbing them with a towel while they ...


4

I have rinsed salted nuts well in water to remove the excessive salt and then dried in the oven. Since salted nuts are already roasted, they don't "roast again" very well at all (or in general behave like raw peanuts when cooked) but you can certainly rinse to remove excess salt and dry at low temperatures. If you want to just eat them immediately you can ...


4

It's a natural process in homemade peanut butter (and in 100% peanut butters). The fat from peanuts is stratifying from the rest. This is assuming you keept the mixture in the machine for longer time. So A) you squished the fat and b) mixed the fat in again. If you stopped blending right after you "buttered" it then the fat is still not homogenised. Just ...


3

You've pretty much answered your own question. Put the PB in a blender, drizzle in a little peanut oil, blitz and season to taste with salt and a little sugar if you want it. I'd add them all slowly: you can always add, you can't take away.


3

The shells are not used in making peanut butter. You would need to shell these peanuts (and remove the papery skins from the individual peanuts) before grinding them to make the peanut butter. It doesn't matter whether they are roasted in the shell or not--what matters is that they are roasted, to give the deeper, richer flavor. I have to assume your ...


3

The best peanut butter, in my subjective opinion, contains peanuts and nothing else. Liquidize the nuts in a food processor until it's as smooth as you want it; and you're done. Peanut butter made this way might go a bit stiff if you leave it, but give it a good stir and it'll go back to normal. Good wholefood brands sell ready-made peanut butter of this ...


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