Hot answers tagged

67

Yes! I just came across this, and it just so happens I could use an orange in a slaw I'm making right now. Tablespoon Orange Hack Simply lop off the ends, make a small incision in the side and carefully open to reveal easy-to-eat orange segments. (Or as I prefer to call it, an orange caterpillar.) I did it with my orange, and I had never peeled an ...


62

There's no reason to peel besides the aesthetics of it. There's no major flavor or nutritional difference either way. If the ginger is going to be seen then peel it, if not don't bother. The best way to peel ginger is to use the edge of a small spoon to rub it off, it works really well, takes seconds, and doesn't waste as much as using a knife or peeler.


37

No peeling is needed. A good wash and proper cooking will handle all of your food safety needs.


22

In theory, yes you can. Whether you want to is a completely different question. The segments are "peeled" by soaking them in hydrochlorid acid. Which sounds worse than it is, because the concentration is somewhere between 1% and 0.3% (sources vary). (1) Once the outer skin is dissolved, the acid is neutralized by dumping them in a lye bath (sodium hydroxide)...


22

Remove a potato one at a time from the hot water with tongs, placing it in cold water for shock. Wearing dishwashing gloves, while under the cold water pull on the potato skin removing it. Place the skinned potato in a finished container and proceed to the next potato


21

Agree with @GdD, that the best way by far to peel it is with a small spoon. If you have a sharp enough knife and are good with it, sure that'll work too (Or the peeler). I first learned this trick from Martin Yan (Yan Can Cook) probably almost 20 years ago... here's a more recent video of him showing this. To answer your other question about why you'd peel ...


19

This is fairly easy, and completely safe, to do with pectinex enzyme. ...and yes, you want to! It is how modernist chefs remove the pith from citrus. You can order Pectinex Ultra-SPL from Modernist Pantry (modernistpantry.com). See this link for the science and technique.


17

You don't want to boil them, you want to blanch them. This means you bring the water to a boil, cut a shallow cross into each tomato (scoring the peel), add the tomatoes (few enough compared to the amount of water that the water doesn't stop boiling) and let them boil for ~1 minute. Remove the tomatoes and dump them straight into ice water. Once cooled the ...


14

I don't know of a taste reason to peel ginger, however the papery peel is tough in texture. I handle ginger in one of two ways: either I freeze it and grate it into my dish using a microplane - fresh ginger flavor instantly whenever I need it; or I chop it into a fine mince before adding. In a hearty textured dish, I guess peeling wouldn't be necessary, but ...


12

Absolutely no peeling necessary. In addition to the above advice, if you (or anyone else) is overly concerned about 'germs' and the like on the skin, use a small plastic-bristled scrub brush to clean the potatoes properly under running water. I usually don't, unless they are really gritty from the field or have huge divots on the surface where water may not ...


12

I almost never peel potatoes. I like the flavor and texture of the skins, even in mashed potatoes, and unpeeled potatoes are less prone to becoming waterlogged. According to Tablespoon.com, the Idaho Potato Commission recommends that you leave potatoes unpeeled for boiling for reasons of flavor and texture, even if you intend to peel the potatoes after ...


11

Unpeeled means not peeled. Do not peel the carrots.


10

I had an application not long ago for which I needed the answer to the question as written. America's Test Kitchen (sorry, paywalled) has a recipe for banana bread that I love. I save over-ripe banana chunks in the freezer until I feel like making banana bread. The recipe calls for "6 large very ripe bananas (about 2 1/4 pounds), peeled". My bananas were ...


8

Per the National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 28, the "refuse" content of a banana is 36%, attributed to the peeling. https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/2159?format=Full


8

That's a manually operated Food Mill/Ricer/Puree-Maker. The Wikipedia Article for Food Mill shows a pic of the same model you have and from that article: Uses of a food mill include removing the seeds from cooked tomatoes, removing pulp or larger pieces from foods (creating apple jelly or any type of purée), and making mashed potatoes or spätzle. ...


7

After 4 years... the classical spoon based method for avocado processing is obsolete. The Triptych Peel Method This combines a well known method to remove the seed, with a scheme for conservatively reducing the skin tension by a series of shallow cuts along the surface. This process allows for direct removal of both seed and skin, with minimal effort and ...


7

Put a flame to the peppers (either on the gas stove or a blowtorch). When it's black, it peels great. The meat will not be cooked. Another way is to put it in the oven until done. When warm they peel great, but of course the meat will be done. Edit: the method described here will be better, still.


7

There are many ways to do it, so it is personal choice. Here is a google search if you need to know more. Here is how I do it. You are going to need two forks and a knife. STEP 1 Place the prickly pear on a cutting board or a plate using a fork by firmly pushing the fork lengthwise into the skin of the prickly pear STEP 2 With a sharp edge knife, cut of ...


7

I rarely peel my potatoes, I love the flavor and nutritional benefits (and ease) of retaining the peelings. If skin is too old or green, then I'll peel. This discusses the concern of green potatoes: Are Green Potatoes OK? PS: I always wash my potatoes with a vegetable brush under water; I always wash all produce.


7

Not only is peeling not needed for potatoes, but in my educated opinion peeling potatoes is not recommended. As long as you follow proper food etiquette like washing your hands and properly washing the foods before you cook them, as well as cooking at the proper temperature, then you do not need to worry about bacteria. Make sure to wash the potato well, ...


7

First i roll it a few times on the table while pressing it gently. This loosens the skin from the meat. Then i make 4 (shallow!) incisions and peel at least 2 of them away including the top and bottom. (so let these stay attached somewhat) Since the skin is already loose, they almost fall off. All pieces stay whole. I then unroll the pieces, and voila. I do ...


7

You could always just use an Orange Peeler. It's a simple, easy-to-use tool you can find in many kitchen convenience stores. For those who can't follow the link - an orange peeler is a tool (usually orange, appropriately enough) with a hook on one end that digs into the orange peel, and a long partly-bent 'lever' at the other end. How you use it is ...


7

Corn has husk, silk and kernels. In the middle there is the cob, which only becomes visible after you have eaten the kernels. The husk is, botanically speaking, formed of leaves, but it has a different texture from the standard leaves and encloses the cob with the kernels snugly. It can be left on the cob during boiling, or removed before boiling. For ...


7

When I cook yukon gold potatoes for a somewhat similar application (minus the eggs and the fish), my family likes the skins on the potatoes, so I don't bother peeling at all, but when it comes time to cut the (still hot) potatoes into chunks, I find the skins don't cut very well. They tend to slide off the potato chunks and clump up into annoying little wads ...


7

If you have the right kind1 of peaches (freestone, ripe), cutting around the stone along the side seam and further on will be enough to let you separate the two halves and lift out the stone. In all other cases, this is where the fun begins. When working with peaches and nectarines, I always start with that initial once-around cut and try turning the halves....


6

A lot of us just eat the peel, but assuming you don't want to... Certainly it's going to be a lot faster to boil a potato that's already been cut up than to boil a whole one, so between boiling whole and peeling, dicing, then boiling, I'd certainly pick the latter. It doesn't really have much to do with cleanliness, though; a good washing leaves the peel ...


6

Apart from Sam's answer, the only important aspect of peeling a hard boiled egg is moisture. When the skin under the shell is dry, it sticks to the egg-white. The best result (100% success) is to crack the shell and place the egg in cold water (I've never tried warm water, but wouldn't be surprised if that works fine as well). After a short while (one ...


6

If you must do it, there are tools for this. The tool set consists of a special fork, and a special knife. The fork has 3 prongs arranged circularly, not flat like a normal fork, and they are thin. The potato does not split when speared on it. The knife looks like a small vegetable peeling knife, slightly curved and ending in a sharp point. You use the ...


6

Another method if you use a gas stove is to roast it over the cooking flame gently. To do this you can stick a knife into the tomato (preferrably in the stem part) and hold it over the flame while rotating it. Some of the peel will burn away and the rest will shrivel up which can be removed using bare hands quite easily. This isn't a mass peeling method ...


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