Hot answers tagged

33

Here is a photo of a peppercorn. You can see why a ground one might contain both black and grey bits.


30

Well, I've never had whole black peppercorns dissolve. In very long cooking, and depending on the variety and age of the peppercorn, they can soften somewhat. But when adding whole peppercorns to a dish, I either plan to remove them after cooking or be prepared to bite into a serious bit of pepper every now and then. To avoid this problem, I generally at ...


28

Strain it, or put the peppercorns in cheesecloth which you can easily remove. Obviously both ideas would work better if the sauce was thin then thickened after the peppercorns were removed.


23

The seeds of all peppers are bitter, you won't notice this when you are using a single pepper in a large dish of food, but if you make hot sauce without removing the seeds you will have a noticeable, and possibly unpleasant bitterness. Grinding the seeds will add more off flavors, so it is worth the effort to get rid of them.


22

What you're describing isn't all that different from how they make various products like Liquid Smoke (make smoke along with steam, then condense that steam). You will need to make sure that some actual condensation occurs (for example, by having a lid for the smokey vapor to condense onto). However, it may be simpler to add a liquid smoke-type product ...


20

One way to steep peppercorns in a sauce is to put them in a tea ball or a tied up piece of cloth which is submerged into the sauce and then removed before serving. If they are just dropped into the sauce they'll have to be strained out, which only works if the sauce is smooth.


19

Peppcorns don't dissolve. They soften, and they give up a lot of their flavour, but they don't dissolve. Neither does ground pepper but that's pieces too small to spot. I'm not sure why you're not finding the peppercorns but after I cook stock overnight they're whole and swollen. I've tasted them: the peppery taste is present but mild, and they're soft. ...


16

According to my research, the effect of capsaicin that causes the burning sensation is indirectly responsible for the pleasurable release of endorphins, which are the brain's way of counter-acting the pain sensation. If you don't feel any burn, then you probably haven't consumed enough capsaicin to trigger the endorphin rush. This source from Northwestern ...


13

There are really only two main varieties of black pepper, Tellicherry and Malabar. They are processed the same, and in general (though you might tell a difference in a side by side comparison) have the same flavor profile. What could easily change the flavor and/or "spiciness" is freshness of the spice, and the grind (both how coarse/fine, and how recently ...


12

First, the most capsaicin (heat) is in the pith of the peppers. You'll find it to a lesser extent in the seeds. Keeping the seeds will definitely change the texture of the sauce, but if you like that texture then by all means, use them. You can also purée the sauce to make it smoother. I would start with the flesh of the pepper and then use the pith to alter ...


11

Better grinding and sieving If you think about it - spice powders are essentially flour. Pop it in a good blender. Blend, let it settle and sieve to required consistency. Repeat with oversized particles. In an industrial setting this would likely mean a large mill and vibrating sieves, but you can, very carefully get the same results on a smaller scale. I ...


10

Here is a snarky but historically enlightening article on the combination from Slate magazine. 1) Salt enhances flavors that already exist in the food. Here is an article discussing the science behind the phenomenon from the ScienceFare site. 2) Pepper brightens flavor, and masks off-putting notes, such as staleness or blandness from overcooking. Black ...


10

When doing a stew or a Cocido (kind of soup) in Spain, it is common to use bags similar to the ones some people use to wash their clothes without mixing them. We call them cooking mesh. As you can see, it can be useful for many things, like using the ingredients separately for other food later, or easier separation. The same works for any food, but the ...


9

Executive summary Buy the shortest pepper mill you can comfortably use and only fill it with two or three weeks worth of peppercorns. The colour should be light and if you buy more than one similarly shaped mill, be sure to buy contrasting colours if they are not otherwise easily distinguishable from one another. You should not chose a transparent mill for ...


8

Yes, though to be clear, you unseal, empty the jars into a pot, heat & add sugar, (while re-cleaning/sterilizing the jars) then fill the hot jars and process. You don't just add sugar to the jars. To suit the food safety fanatics, use new lids. I, personally, figure that if I use old lids and they seal, it's fine, because it sealed, and I know that ...


8

Ground pepper begins to lose it's flavors very quickly. You can try this yourself by grinding your own, then tasting over the course of a couple of days. I find it is always best right after I grind it. Sealing a container of ground pepper might help, but who knows how long between grinding and sealing? Then, once you remove the seal, flavor is degrading ...


8

The entire world is confused by what type of 'pepper' anything generally called a chilli actually is. Farmers may know exactly what cultivar they are growing; supermarket or food production/processing buyers may only care about what family it belongs to. By the time it reaches the supermarket shelf, it's anyone's guess. Cayenne is already a family of ...


7

Yes. This happens to me. Some scientists are investigating the possibility of using the peppercorns as a means of reducing people's salt intake. Potential of Szechuan pepper as a saltiness enhancer, Tram Hong Le Bao, Siree Chaiseri and Yaowapa Lorjaroenphon, International Journal of Food Properties 21(1), pp533-545.


7

Most recipes I am aware of simply press crushed pepper onto the steak. It is true that some will fall off, but these recipes apply pepper generously with that in mind. I have not come across the egg white method (not sure I want egg white on my steak), but I did see a recipe that adds crushed pepper to melted butter, then coating the steak with the mixture, ...


7

It is typically black pepper. The two common black varieties are Tellicherry and Malabar. The peppercorn is the fruit of a flowering vine that is harvested when it is red, and ripe. Each fruit contains one seed, which is dried and then packaged whole or ground.


6

Most basic mills with steel grinders will be OK What breaks them are Overly aggressive grinding; just grind gently and your mill will last much longer Keep them dry; do not use a pepper grinder over a steaming pot. Grind pepper into a bowl or plate, and then pour into pot Old peppercorns; as they age and dry, they get tougher to grind, and wear most mills ...


6

Some people are sensitive to white pepper, which might smell as horse urine or swine manure to them. This is because the fermentation process produces of white pepper produces some of the same chemical compounds. The older the pepper gets the more concentrated the odor will be. There is no way around this if you are one of those who does smell this as it is ...


6

I've definitely done this with ketchup before, with a couple key tweaks: Spreading the sauce onto a rimmed baking sheet. This is to maximize surface area for smoking. I used a Traeger pellet-smoker, so I'm not sure how a Weber might work. I'm not sure how effective this'll be in your case, but the general principle is sound (and delicious). Example recipe ...


6

Normally no. Paprika and the like are dried and powdered. You will likely get some red coloration if you puree your fresh red peppers before adding to your stew. Absent that step, the red remains mostly in the pepper chunks.


5

Better or worse is a judgement call. Smoking the peppers then making the sauce v. smoking the sauce will produce different results, but both will impart smokiness. So, you can, in fact, impart smoke flavor in a liquid by using a smoker. For example, I've smoked water, then used it to cook eggs.


5

This will definitely work, but I would recommend stirring it every once in a while as it will mostly be affecting only the surface. A shallow vessel with a larger surface area will also impart more smokiness faster.


5

It depends upon how much you expect the broth to be reduced while making the dish, and how salty the other ingredients in the dish are. Risotto is a good example of a dish that should be made with a broth less salty than would be ideal for just drinking. The broth will be reduced significantly while making the risotto (so the salt will become more ...


5

Capers and peppercorns are completely different. I am not saying that you cannot substitute one for the other, it is just you won't get the same final result. Since it appears you are looking for "Green Peppercorns" they are very mild compared to Black ones. If you have white pepper or any other peppercorns other than black you would be OK. You can always ...


5

It's not just saltiness, but various taste sensitivities that are impacted by pepper. Basically, piperine (the component in black pepper which causes its pungency) and capsaicin (the "hot" chemical in hot peppers) cause mild irritation and inflammation in the mouth when consumed. That inflammation leads to additional sensitivity of taste receptors. ...


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