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29

I suspect that these will be pickled almonds. Almonds are a favorite ingredient in many middle-Eastern dishes. The green color and fuzz give it away, most other fruits like apricots and plums lack enough fuzz to be noticeable at the unripe stage and are very hard when unripe. I found a recipe with this photo: Are these are what you are after?


12

It's probably green almonds like bob1 suggested. We eat them raw as a fruit or they can be pickled. They are called Oja in the Syrian region عوجا.


9

So, fermentation is complicated, and the answer to this question really depends on multiple factors. You're particularly interested in the role of sugar vs. salt, not lactobacillus vs. yeast. The simple answer to that question is that lactobacilli are salt-tolerant, while yeast is much less so. So adding salt gives the lactobacilli a headstart in converting ...


8

I love capers and add them to different foods when I think it suits it. I'd much rather eat tartar (not tarter) sauce with capers than pickles in it. But them I'm not a fan of tartar sauce (maybe because of the pickles). If you add capers, rinse them first to remove excess salt, pat water off between a paper towel and chop finely. I think a tiny bit of ...


7

While you could certainly use plain white vinegar, there's not all that much difference between that and cider vinegar if "vinegar" is the taste you're objecting to. If you are canning the pickles, changing the recipe could kill you. The vinegar helps to produce an acid environment where botulism does not grow. So, if it turns out you don't like pickles in ...


6

As Lorel C mentioned in the comments, botulinum clostridium won't grow in acidic environments. It also won't grow in cold environments. You've got the peppers in vinegar and in the refrigerator. I think you're good. Even with the peppers being fairly warm when refrigerated— it's always a good idea to let things cool in the open air before putting them into ...


5

Mustard seeds and other spices are there for flavor only; it's perfectly safe to leave them out. But don't mess with amounts of salt or vinegar given in your recipe--those are important for preventing bacterial growth. If your recipe also contains bay leaf or grape leaf, those too can be omitted, but you pickles won't be as crisp. Likewise if you omit the ...


5

Sweet pickles, miniature if you're not dicing them, it doesn't matter if you are dicing them. Look for a bit of crunch; cornichons provide texture as well as flavor.


4

Both capers & pickles is not unheard of, as in the sauce tartare recipe in Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Wikipedia also thinks capers and pickles are a common combination in tartar sauce. I think it would probably be a good sauce with the pickles swapped out, but I've only added capers to the pickles, not substitued.


4

You need to ferment in a cool place, so you can only ferment pickles in the monsoon season when temperatures are down, or inside a house with A.C. Vegetables turn soft if it's too hot. Taste and feel is important here. Soft vegetables are the biggest problem if it's too hot. On the 3rd day it is good to place in the fridge to slow the fermenting, if you can....


4

If temperatures are above 90, your pickles will probably be ready in a day, two at most. Any more time is just going to cook them, like you've experienced (where they're so soft you can't remove them from the jar). In any case, you definitely want to check on your pickles at least once a day, and keep them in a shady spot so they don't get quite so warm. ...


4

The best advice anyone can give you is to please stop experimenting and use tested recipes. Particularly for acidified pickles, there are huge numbers of resources out there with tested recipes verified by scientific protocols. (That is, they tried them many times under many conditions and tested stored versions for microorganism growth to verify they are ...


3

In addition to Marti's good advice about temperature, I've only had consistent success with Kirby cucumbers, also called (for good reasons) "pickling cucumbers". Raw Kirbies are very firm—even crispy. That lets them stand up to fermentation. When I first tried pickling, I used slicing and English cucumbers—which left me sad and frustrated. I ...


3

"How can I know if the pickles were pickled correctly": Based on whether they taste good to you. With refrigerator pickles like this, you don't need to worry about them fermenting incorrectly or growing the wrong kind of microorganisms. If you think they're too vinegary, reduce the vinegar content. FWIW, a 1:1 ratio of water to vinegar is much stronger than ...


3

Most likely commercial pickles are preserved by an accurate pasteurisation and ascorbic acid or other chemical preservatives so that the "brine" contains much less salt as compared to your homemade ones. It is mattert of the liquid density, yours is heavier. (Though the density of the vegetables might likely vary a bit - and though surface/volume ratio ...


3

The tea filter idea works well and is exactly what I would propose. You can buy ready-made paper or fabric tea filters that are smaller than coffee filters and more porous. If you want to use metal filters, make sure they are not reactive (like stainless steel) or they can influence the taste of the finished product. Put your herbs in a filter bag, tie off ...


3

I don't see how it would change the process. Besides, I've seen the same pickled fermented cucumbers cut, although lengthwise. However you cut them, it will be fine.


3

I'd transfer to pint mason jars and store in the refrigerator -- at least until I figured out what to do next.


2

Given the rectangular shape of a refrigerator, I'd transfer into rectangular, stackable, smaller containers that can lurk at the back of many shelves, rather than one big hulking bucket on the bottom shelf. This also limits contamination as you open the container to get some to eat, makes it easier to decide to get some to eat, and allows the fridge space ...


2

Pickles will ferment at around 65 - 72F The temperature can go lower overnight but needs to rise during the day. Get a thermometer to test places like cupboards, kitchen for the temperature range you need. This worked for me. I keep a strip thermometer with my stash.


2

Usually, pickles are classified as "vinegar pickles" or "lacto-fermented" pickles. Vinegar pickles, unless canned in a hot water bath or pressure canner, are typically for short term consumption, and stored in the refrigerator. I would say less than a week. Lacto-fermented pickles go through a fermentation process that makes them edible for a much longer ...


1

Thanks for your reply. I think I may have found the answer here. Apparently you can sous vide pickles to pasteurize them, and then leave them packed in vinegar so no bacteria can grow. As I read this, salt is just a flavoring agent here. https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/make-crisp-flavor-packed-pickles-on-the-quick Now, is there a way to make corned ...


1

No, there is no danger. Just slice the pickles then put them back in the jar or alternatively wrap them in foil and place them back in the refrigerator until you need them.


1

Like the other response said, keep your jars out in a warm spot in your home. I am in California too. Ferments do really well at 72 degrees and over. The colder your temperature, your ferment will take longer. Like CA winters can be cold, relatively, and my pickles and green tomatoes take a over month and a half for full sour. In the summers, I can turn out ...


1

Pretty much any type of vinegar works. update: Responding to comment below, I guess I would stay away from distilled white vinegar and and any "heavy" types such as balsamico, jejiang, shanxi and so on. Apple cider vinegar, white or red wine vinegar, sherry vinegar and so on would all work well.


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