29

I suspect that these will be pickled almonds. Almonds are a favorite ingredient in many middle-Eastern dishes. The green color and fuzz give it away, most other fruits like apricots and plums lack enough fuzz to be noticeable at the unripe stage and are very hard when unripe. I found a recipe with this photo: Are these are what you are after?


12

It's probably green almonds like bob1 suggested. We eat them raw as a fruit or they can be pickled. They are called Oja in the Syrian region عوجا.


3

"How can I know if the pickles were pickled correctly": Based on whether they taste good to you. With refrigerator pickles like this, you don't need to worry about them fermenting incorrectly or growing the wrong kind of microorganisms. If you think they're too vinegary, reduce the vinegar content. FWIW, a 1:1 ratio of water to vinegar is much stronger than ...


2

In canning, you can't make up your own recipes. There are too many "gotchas" which you cannot predict or measure. So while in principle yes, acid will make a low-acid food cannable in a water bath, just taking a recipe meant for other use and canning it is not safe. And you have to follow it exactly - if the recipe is for cut-up onion for example, you cannot ...


1

As far as I'm aware, the difference between 'regular' pickles & 'Jewish' pickles is sugar & dill. [I honestly don't know what makes them Jewish, but my partner grew up in the Jewish community & that's what she calls them, so that's about as much research as I've done ;-) So - you'd think that adding sugar & dill & leaving them for a ...


1

Thanks for your reply. I think I may have found the answer here. Apparently you can sous vide pickles to pasteurize them, and then leave them packed in vinegar so no bacteria can grow. As I read this, salt is just a flavoring agent here. https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/make-crisp-flavor-packed-pickles-on-the-quick Now, is there a way to make corned ...


1

No: if you're making pickled eggs for long-term storage (i.e. in a fridge), you must cook them thoroughly (i.e. hard boil them). Also, immersing food such as eggs in alcohol and/or acid (i.e. vinegar) will denature the protein, giving it the texture/appearance of having been cooked, but will not kill bacteria/micro-organisms present. Basically, you'll more-...


1

Properly commercially sealed herring in vinegar brine can be stored for VERY long time in the fridge, and possibly at room temperature. Some brands "Noah's Gourmet" for example, I'm pretty sure they hot seal the herring because it is ALWAYS white and mushy upon opening. Almost mashed potato mouth feel. Or maybe not. The ones that aren't mushy, and have a ...


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